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Tuesday - December 18, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [variation]

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variation

VARIA'TION, n. [L. variatio. See Vary.]

1. Alteration; a partial change in the form, position, state or qualities of the same thing; as a variation of color in different lights; a variation in the size of a plant from day to day; the unceasing, though slow variation of language; a variation in a soil from year to year. Our opinions are subject to continual variations.

The essences of things are conceived not capable of such variation.

2. Difference; change from one to another.

In some other places are born more females than males; which, upon this variation of proportion, I recommend to the curious.

3. In grammar, change of termination of nouns and adjectives, constituting what is called case, number and gender; as the variation of words.

4. Deviation; as a variation of a transcript from the original.

5. In astronomy, the variation of the moon is the third inequality in her motion; by which, when out of the quadratures, her true place differs from her place twice equated.

6. In geography and navigation, the deviation of the magnetic needle from the true north point; called also declination.

The variation of the needle at New Haven, in 1820, as ascertained from the mean of numerous observations made by Professor Fisher, was 4 degrees 25.42' west.

7. In music, the different manner of singing or playing the same air or tune, by subdividing the notes into several others of less value, or by adding graces, yet so that the tune itself may be discovered through all its embellishments.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [variation]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

VARIA'TION, n. [L. variatio. See Vary.]

1. Alteration; a partial change in the form, position, state or qualities of the same thing; as a variation of color in different lights; a variation in the size of a plant from day to day; the unceasing, though slow variation of language; a variation in a soil from year to year. Our opinions are subject to continual variations.

The essences of things are conceived not capable of such variation.

2. Difference; change from one to another.

In some other places are born more females than males; which, upon this variation of proportion, I recommend to the curious.

3. In grammar, change of termination of nouns and adjectives, constituting what is called case, number and gender; as the variation of words.

4. Deviation; as a variation of a transcript from the original.

5. In astronomy, the variation of the moon is the third inequality in her motion; by which, when out of the quadratures, her true place differs from her place twice equated.

6. In geography and navigation, the deviation of the magnetic needle from the true north point; called also declination.

The variation of the needle at New Haven, in 1820, as ascertained from the mean of numerous observations made by Professor Fisher, was 4 degrees 25.42' west.

7. In music, the different manner of singing or playing the same air or tune, by subdividing the notes into several others of less value, or by adding graces, yet so that the tune itself may be discovered through all its embellishments.

VA-RI-A'TION, n. [Fr. from L. variatio. See Vary.]

  1. Alteration; a partial change in the form, position, state, or qualities of the same thing; as, a variation of color in different lights; a variation in the size of a plant from day to day; the unceasing, though slow variation of language; a variation in a soil from year to year. Our opinions are subject to continual variations. The essences of things are conceived not capable of such variation. – Locke.
  2. Difference; change from one to another. In some other places are born more females than males; which, upon this variation of proportion, I recommend to the curious. – Graunt.
  3. In grammar, change of termination of nouns and adjectives, constituting what is called case, number and gender; as, the variation of words.
  4. Deviation; as, a variation of a transcript from the original . – Dryden.
  5. In astronomy, the variation of the moon is the third inequality in her motion; by which, when out of the quadratures, her true place differs from her place twice equated. – Cyc.
  6. In geography and navigation, the deviation of the magnetic needle from the true north point; called also declination. Cyc. The variation of the needle at New Haven, in 1819, as ascertained from the mean of numerous observations made by Professor Fisher, was 4° 25' 25" west.
  7. In music, the different manner of singing or playing the same air or tune, by subdividing the notes into several others of less value, or by adding graces, yet so that the tune itself may be discovered through all its embellishments . – Cyc.

Va`ri*a"tion
  1. The act of varying; a partial change in the form, position, state, or qualities of a thing; modification; alternation; mutation; diversity; deviation; as, a variation of color in different lights; a variation in size; variation of language.

    The essences of things are conceived not capable of any such variation. Locke.

  2. Extent to which a thing varies; amount of departure from a position or state; amount or rate of change.
  3. Change of termination of words, as in declension, conjugation, derivation, etc.
  4. Repetition of a theme or melody with fanciful embellishments or modifications, in time, tune, or harmony, or sometimes change of key; the presentation of a musical thought in new and varied aspects, yet so that the essential features of the original shall still preserve their identity.
  5. One of the different arrangements which can be made of any number of quantities taking a certain number of them together.

    Annual variation (Astron.), the yearly change in the right ascension or declination of a star, produced by the combined effects of the precession of the equinoxes and the proper motion of the star. -- Calculus of variations. See under Calculus. -- Variation compass. See under Compass. -- Variation of the moon (Astron.), an inequality of the moon's motion, depending on the angular distance of the moon from the sun. It is greater at the octants, and zero at the quadratures. -- Variation of the needle (Geog. *** Naut.), the angle included between the true and magnetic meridians of a place] the deviation of the direction of a magnetic needle from the true north and south line; -- called also declination of the needle.

    Syn. -- Change; vicissitude; variety; deviation.

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Variation

VARIA'TION, noun [Latin variatio. See Vary.]

1. Alteration; a partial change in the form, position, state or qualities of the same thing; as a variation of color in different lights; a variation in the size of a plant from day to day; the unceasing, though slow variation of language; a variation in a soil from year to year. Our opinions are subject to continual variations.

The essences of things are conceived not capable of such variation

2. Difference; change from one to another.

In some other places are born more females than males; which, upon this variation of proportion, I recommend to the curious.

3. In grammar, change of termination of nouns and adjectives, constituting what is called case, number and gender; as the variation of words.

4. Deviation; as a variation of a transcript from the original.

5. In astronomy, the variation of the moon is the third inequality in her motion; by which, when out of the quadratures, her true place differs from her place twice equated.

6. In geography and navigation, the deviation of the magnetic needle from the true north point; called also declination.

The variation of the needle at New Haven, in 1820, as ascertained from the mean of numerous observations made by Professor Fisher, was 4 degrees 25.42' west.

7. In music, the different manner of singing or playing the same air or tune, by subdividing the notes into several others of less value, or by adding graces, yet so that the tune itself may be discovered through all its embellishments.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

snarl

SN'ARL, v.i. [This word seems to be allied to gnarl, and to proceed from some root signifyingto twist, bind, or fasten, or to involve, entangle, and thus to be allied to snare.]

1. To growl, as an angry or surly dog; to gnarl; to utter grumbling sounds; but it expresses more violence than grumble. That I should snarl and bit and play the dog.

2. To speak roughly; to talk in rude murmuring terms. It is malicious and unmanly to snarl at the little lapses of a pen, from with Virgil himself stands not exempted.

SN'ARL, v.t.

1. To entangle; to complicate; to involve in knots; as, to snarl the hair; to snarl a skain of thread. [This word is in universal popular use in New England.]

2. To embarrass.

SN'ARL, n. Entanglement; a knot or complication of hair, thread, &c., which it is difficult to disentangle.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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