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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [value]

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value

VALUE, n. val'u. [L. valor, from valeo, to be worth.]

1. Worth; that property or those properties of a thing which render it useful or estimable; or the degree of that property or of such properties. The real value of a thing is its utility, its power or capacity of procuring or producing good. Hence the real or intrinsic value of iron, is far greater than that of gold. But there is, in many things, an estimated value, depending on opinion or fashion, such as the value of precious stones. The value of land depends on its fertility, or on its vicinity to a market, or on both.

2. Price; the rate of worth set upon a commodity, or the amount for which a thing is sold. We say, the value of a thing is what it will bring in market.

3. Worth; applied to persons.

Ye are all physicians of no value. Job. 13.

Ye are of more value than many sparrows. Matt. 10.

4. High rate.

Caesar is well acquainted with your virtue, and therefore sets this value on your life.

5. Importance; efficacy in producing effects; as considerations of no value.

Before events shall have decided on the value of the measures.

6. Import; precise signification; as the value of a word or phrase.

VALUE, v.t. val'u.

1. To estimate the worth of; to rate at a certain price; to apprise; as, to value lands or goods.

2. To rate at a high price; to have in high esteem; as a valued poem or picture. A man is apt to value his own performances at too high a rate; he is even disposed to value himself for his humility.

3. To esteem; to hold in respect and estimation; as, to value one for his works or virtues.

4. To take account of.

The mind doth value every moment.

5. To reckon or estimate with respect to number or power.

The queen is valu'd thirty thousand strong.

6. To consider with respect to importance.

The king must take it ill, so slightly valu'd in his messenger.

Neither of them valued their premises according to the rules of honor or integrity.

7. To raise to estimation.

Some value themselves to their country by jealousies to the crown. [Not in use.]

8. To be worth. [Not in use.]



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [value]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

VALUE, n. val'u. [L. valor, from valeo, to be worth.]

1. Worth; that property or those properties of a thing which render it useful or estimable; or the degree of that property or of such properties. The real value of a thing is its utility, its power or capacity of procuring or producing good. Hence the real or intrinsic value of iron, is far greater than that of gold. But there is, in many things, an estimated value, depending on opinion or fashion, such as the value of precious stones. The value of land depends on its fertility, or on its vicinity to a market, or on both.

2. Price; the rate of worth set upon a commodity, or the amount for which a thing is sold. We say, the value of a thing is what it will bring in market.

3. Worth; applied to persons.

Ye are all physicians of no value. Job. 13.

Ye are of more value than many sparrows. Matt. 10.

4. High rate.

Caesar is well acquainted with your virtue, and therefore sets this value on your life.

5. Importance; efficacy in producing effects; as considerations of no value.

Before events shall have decided on the value of the measures.

6. Import; precise signification; as the value of a word or phrase.

VALUE, v.t. val'u.

1. To estimate the worth of; to rate at a certain price; to apprise; as, to value lands or goods.

2. To rate at a high price; to have in high esteem; as a valued poem or picture. A man is apt to value his own performances at too high a rate; he is even disposed to value himself for his humility.

3. To esteem; to hold in respect and estimation; as, to value one for his works or virtues.

4. To take account of.

The mind doth value every moment.

5. To reckon or estimate with respect to number or power.

The queen is valu'd thirty thousand strong.

6. To consider with respect to importance.

The king must take it ill, so slightly valu'd in his messenger.

Neither of them valued their premises according to the rules of honor or integrity.

7. To raise to estimation.

Some value themselves to their country by jealousies to the crown. [Not in use.]

8. To be worth. [Not in use.]

VAL'UE, n. [val'u; Fr. valoir, valu; from L. valor, from valeo, to be worth; It. valore; Sp. valor.]

  1. Worth; that property or those properties of a thing which render it useful or estimable; or the degree of that property or of such properties. The real value of a thing is its utility, its power or capacity of procuring or producing good. Hence the real or intrinsic value of iron, is far greater than that of gold. But there is, in many things, an estimated value, depending on opinion or fashion, such as the value of precious stones. The value of land depends on its fertility, or on its vicinity to a market, or on both.
  2. Price; the rate of worth set upon a commodity, or the amount for which a thing is sold. We say, the value of a thing is what it will bring in market.
  3. Worth; applied to persons. Ye are all physicians of no value. Job xiii. Ye are of more value than many sparrows. Matth. x.
  4. High rate. Cesar is well acquainted with your virtue, / And therefore sets this value on your life. – Addison.
  5. Importance; efficacy in producing effects; as, considerations of no value. Before events shalt have decided on the value of the measures. – Marshall.
  6. Import; precise signification; as, the value of a word or phrase. – Mitford.

VAL'UE, v.t. [val'u.]

  1. To estimate the worth of; to rate at a certain price; to apprize; as, to value lands or goods.
  2. To rate at a high price; to have in high esteem; as, a valued poem or picture. A man is apt to value his own performances at too high a rate; he is even disposed to value himself for his humility.
  3. To esteem; to hold in respect and estimation; as, to value one for his works or virtues.
  4. To take account of. The mind doth value every moment. – Bacon.
  5. To reckon or estimate with respect to number or power. The queen is valu'd thirty thousand strong. – Shak.
  6. To consider with respect to importance. The king must take it ill, / So slightly valu'd in his messenger. – Shak. Neither of them valued their promises according to the rules of honor or integrity. – Clarendon.
  7. To raise to estimation. Some value themselves to their country by jealousies to the crown. [Not in use.] – Temple.
  8. To be worth. [Not in use.] – Shak.

Val"ue
  1. The property or aggregate properties of a thing by which it is rendered useful or desirable, or the degree of such property or sum of properties; worth; excellence; utility; importance.

    Ye are all physicians of no value. Job xiii. 4.

    Ye are of more value than many sparrows. Matt. x. 31.

    Cæsar is well acquainted with your virtue,
    And therefore sets this value on your life.
    Addison.

    Before events shall have decided on the value of the measures. Marshall.

  2. To estimate the value, or worth, of] to rate at a certain price; to appraise; to reckon with respect to number, power, importance, etc.

    The mind doth value every moment. Bacon.

    The queen is valued thirty thousand strong. Shak.

    The king must take it ill,
    That he's so slightly valued in his messenger.
    Shak.

    Neither of them valued their promises according to rules of honor or integrity. Clarendon.

  3. That property of a color by which it is distinguished as bright or dark; luminosity.

    (b)
  4. Worth estimated by any standard of purchasing power, especially by the market price, or the amount of money agreed upon as an equivalent to the utility and cost of anything.

    An article may be possessed of the highest degree of utility, or power to minister to our wants and enjoyments, and may be universally made use of, without possessing exchangeable value. M'Culloch.

    Value is the power to command commodities generally. A. L. Chapin (Johnson's Cys.).

    Value is the generic term which expresses power in exchange. F. A. Walker.

    His design was not to pay him the value of his pictures, because they were above any price. Dryden.

    &fist] In political economy, value is often distinguished as intrinsic and exchangeable. Intrinsic value is the same as utility or adaptation to satisfy the desires or wants of men. Exchangeable value is that in an article or product which disposes individuals to give for it some quantity of labor, or some other article or product obtainable by labor; as, pure air has an intrinsic value, but generally not an exchangeable value.

  5. To rate highly; to have in high esteem; to hold in respect and estimation; to appreciate; to prize; as, to value one for his works or his virtues.

    Which of the dukes he values most. Shak.

  6. Any particular quantitative determination; as, a function's value for some special value of its argument.
  7. Precise signification; import; as, the value of a word; the value of a legal instrument

    Mitford.
  8. To raise to estimation; to cause to have value, either real or apparent; to enhance in value.

    [Obs.]

    Some value themselves to their country by jealousies of the crown. Sir W. Temple.

  9. The valuable ingredients to be obtained by treatment from any mass or compound; specif., the precious metals contained in rock, gravel, or the like; as, the vein carries good values; the values on the hanging walls.
  10. Esteem; regard.

    Dryden.

    My relation to the person was so near, and my value for him so great Bp. Burnet.

  11. To be worth; to be equal to in value.

    [Obs.]

    The peace between the French and us not values
    The cost that did conclude it.
    Shak.

    Syn. -- To compute; rate; appraise; esteem; respect; regard; estimate; prize; appreciate.

  12. The relative length or duration of a tone or note, answering to quantity in prosody; thus, a quarter note [(?)] has the value of two eighth notes [(?)].
  13. In an artistical composition, the character of any one part in its relation to other parts and to the whole; -- often used in the plural; as, the values are well given, or well maintained.
  14. Valor.

    [Written also valew.] [Obs.] Spenser.

    Value received, a phrase usually employed in a bill of exchange or a promissory note, to denote that a consideration has been given for it. Bouvier.

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Value

VALUE, noun val'u. [Latin valor, from valeo, to be worth.]

1. Worth; that property or those properties of a thing which render it useful or estimable; or the degree of that property or of such properties. The real value of a thing is its utility, its power or capacity of procuring or producing good. Hence the real or intrinsic value of iron, is far greater than that of gold. But there is, in many things, an estimated value depending on opinion or fashion, such as the value of precious stones. The value of land depends on its fertility, or on its vicinity to a market, or on both.

2. Price; the rate of worth set upon a commodity, or the amount for which a thing is sold. We say, the value of a thing is what it will bring in market.

3. Worth; applied to persons.

Ye are all physicians of no value Job 13:4.

Ye are of more value than many sparrows. Matthew 10:31.

4. High rate.

Caesar is well acquainted with your virtue, and therefore sets this value on your life.

5. Importance; efficacy in producing effects; as considerations of no value

Before events shall have decided on the value of the measures.

6. Import; precise signification; as the value of a word or phrase.

VALUE, verb transitive val'u.

1. To estimate the worth of; to rate at a certain price; to apprise; as, to value lands or goods.

2. To rate at a high price; to have in high esteem; as a valued poem or picture. A man is apt to value his own performances at too high a rate; he is even disposed to value himself for his humility.

3. To esteem; to hold in respect and estimation; as, to value one for his works or virtues.

4. To take account of.

The mind doth value every moment.

5. To reckon or estimate with respect to number or power.

The queen is valu'd thirty thousand strong.

6. To consider with respect to importance.

The king must take it ill, so slightly valu'd in his messenger.

Neither of them valued their premises according to the rules of honor or integrity.

7. To raise to estimation.

Some value themselves to their country by jealousies to the crown. [Not in use.]

8. To be worth. [Not in use.]

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Words hold much power, if we don't know true meanings what we say/write is distorted and power lessens or is confused. This lack of understanding leads to lack of wisdom which is destructive to self and society.

— Frannia (East Stroudsburg, PA)

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JET'TY, v.i. To jut.

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Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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