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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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up

UP, adv.

1. Aloft; on high

But up or down -

2. Out of bed. He is not up.

3. Having risen from a seat.

Sir Roger was up.

4. From a state of concealment or discumbiture.

5. In a state of being built.

Up with my tent.

6. Above the horizon. The sun is up.

7. To a state of excitement. He was wrought up to a rage.

8. To a state of advance or proficiency.

- Till we have wrought ourselves up to this degree of christian indifference.

9. In a state of elevation or exaltation.

Those that were up, kept others low.

10. In a state of climbing or ascending. We went up to the city or town.

11. In a state of insurrection.

The gentle archbishop of York is up.

My soul is up in arms.

12. In a state of being increased or raised. The river is up; the flood is up.

13. In a state of approaching; as up comes a fox.

14. In order. He drew up his regiment.

15. From younger to elder years; as from his youth up.

1. Up and down, from one place to another; here and there.

2. From one state or position to another; backwards and forwards.

1. Up to, to an equal highth with; as up to the chin in water.

2. To a degree or point adequate. Live up to the principles professed.

Up with, raise; life; as, up with the fist; up with the timber.

Up is much used to modify the actions expressed by verbs. It is very often useful and necessary; very often useless.

To bear up, to sustain.

To go up, to ascend.

To lift up, to raise.

To get up, to rise from bed or a seat.

To bind up, to bind together.

To blow up, to inflate; to distend; to inflame.

To grow up, to grow to maturity.

Up stream, from the mouth towards the head of a stream; against the stream; hence up is in a direction towards the head of a stream or river; as up the country.

Up sound, in the direction from the sea; opposed to down sound, that is, in the direction of the ebb tide.

Up is used elliptically for get up, expressing a command or exhortation.

Up, let us be going. Judges 19.

UP, prep. From a lower to a higher place. Go up the hill.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [up]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

UP, adv.

1. Aloft; on high

But up or down -

2. Out of bed. He is not up.

3. Having risen from a seat.

Sir Roger was up.

4. From a state of concealment or discumbiture.

5. In a state of being built.

Up with my tent.

6. Above the horizon. The sun is up.

7. To a state of excitement. He was wrought up to a rage.

8. To a state of advance or proficiency.

- Till we have wrought ourselves up to this degree of christian indifference.

9. In a state of elevation or exaltation.

Those that were up, kept others low.

10. In a state of climbing or ascending. We went up to the city or town.

11. In a state of insurrection.

The gentle archbishop of York is up.

My soul is up in arms.

12. In a state of being increased or raised. The river is up; the flood is up.

13. In a state of approaching; as up comes a fox.

14. In order. He drew up his regiment.

15. From younger to elder years; as from his youth up.

1. Up and down, from one place to another; here and there.

2. From one state or position to another; backwards and forwards.

1. Up to, to an equal highth with; as up to the chin in water.

2. To a degree or point adequate. Live up to the principles professed.

Up with, raise; life; as, up with the fist; up with the timber.

Up is much used to modify the actions expressed by verbs. It is very often useful and necessary; very often useless.

To bear up, to sustain.

To go up, to ascend.

To lift up, to raise.

To get up, to rise from bed or a seat.

To bind up, to bind together.

To blow up, to inflate; to distend; to inflame.

To grow up, to grow to maturity.

Up stream, from the mouth towards the head of a stream; against the stream; hence up is in a direction towards the head of a stream or river; as up the country.

Up sound, in the direction from the sea; opposed to down sound, that is, in the direction of the ebb tide.

Up is used elliptically for get up, expressing a command or exhortation.

Up, let us be going. Judges 19.

UP, prep. From a lower to a higher place. Go up the hill.


UP, adv. [Sax. up, upp; G. auf; D. and Dan. op; Sw. up.]

  1. Aloft; on high. But up or down. Milton.
  2. Out of bed. He is not up. Shak.
  3. Having risen from a seat. Sir Roger was up. Addison.
  4. From a state of concealment or discumbiture.
  5. In a state of being built. Up with my tent. Shak.
  6. Above the horizon. The sun is up.
  7. To a state of excitement. He was wrought up to a rage
  8. To a state of advance or proficiency. Till we have wrought ourselves up to this degree of Christian indifference. Atterbury.
  9. In a state of elevation or exaltation. Those that were up, kept others low. Spenser.
  10. In a state of climbing or ascending. We went up to the city or town.
  11. In a state of insurrection. The gentle archbishop of York is up. Shak. My soul is up in arms. Dryden.
  12. In a state of being increased or raised. The river is up; the flood is up. Dryden.
  13. In a state of approaching; as, up comes a fox. L'Estrange.
  14. In order. He drew up his regiment.
  15. From younger to elder years; as, from his youth up. Up and down, from one place to another; here and there. #2. From one state or position to another; backward and forward. Up to, to an equal highth with; as, up to the chin in water. #2. To a degree or point adequate. Live up to the principles professed. Up with, raise; as, up with the fist; up with the timber. Up is much used to modify the actions expressed by verb; It is very often useful and necessary, very often useless. To bear up, to sustain. To go up, to ascend. To lift up, to raise. To get up, to rise from bed or a seat. To bind up, to bind together. To blow up, to inflate; to distend; to inflame. To grow up, to grow to maturity. Up stream, from the mouth toward the head of a stream; against the stream; hence up is in a direction toward the head of a stream or river; as, up the country. Up sound, in the direction from the sea; opposed to down sound, that is, in the direction of the ebb tide. Up is used elliptically for get up, expressing a command or exhortation. Up, let us be going. Judges xix.

UP, prep.

From a lower to a higher place. Go up the hill. Bacon.


Up
  1. Aloft] on high; in a direction contrary to that of gravity; toward or in a higher place or position; above; -- the opposite of down.

    But up or down,
    By center or eccentric, hard to tell.
    Milton.

  2. From a lower to a higher place on, upon, or along; at a higher situation upon; at the top of.

    In going up a hill, the knees will be most weary; in going down, the thihgs. Bacon.

  3. The state of being up or above; a state of elevation, prosperity, or the like; -- rarely occurring except in the phrase ups and downs.

    [Colloq.]

    Ups and downs, alternate states of elevation and depression, or of prosperity and the contrary. [Colloq.]

    They had their ups and downs of fortune. Thackeray.

  4. Inclining up; tending or going up; upward; as, an up look; an up grade; the up train.
  5. From a lower to a higher position, literally or figuratively; as, from a recumbent or sitting position; from the mouth, toward the source, of a river; from a dependent or inferior condition; from concealment; from younger age; from a quiet state, or the like; -- used with verbs of motion expressed or implied.

    But they presumed to go up unto the hilltop. Num. xiv. 44.

    I am afflicted and ready to die from my youth up. Ps. lxxxviii. 15.

    Up rose the sun, and up rose Emelye. Chaucer.

    We have wrought ourselves up into this degree of Christian indifference. Atterbury.

    (b)

  6. From the coast towards the interior of, as a country; from the mouth towards the source of, as a stream; as, to journey up the country; to sail up the Hudson.
  7. Upon.

    [Obs.] "Up pain of death." Chaucer.
1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Up

UP, adverb

1. Aloft; on high

But up or down -

2. Out of bed. He is not up

3. Having risen from a seat.

Sir Roger was up

4. From a state of concealment or discumbiture.

5. In a state of being built.

UP with my tent.

6. Above the horizon. The sun is up

7. To a state of excitement. He was wrought up to a rage.

8. To a state of advance or proficiency.

- Till we have wrought ourselves up to this degree of christian indifference.

9. In a state of elevation or exaltation.

Those that were up kept others low.

10. In a state of climbing or ascending. We went up to the city or town.

11. In a state of insurrection.

The gentle archbishop of York is up

My soul is up in arms.

12. In a state of being increased or raised. The river is up; the flood is up

13. In a state of approaching; as up comes a fox.

14. In order. He drew up his regiment.

15. From younger to elder years; as from his youth up

1. up and down, from one place to another; here and there.

2. From one state or position to another; backwards and forwards.

1. up to, to an equal highth with; as up to the chin in water.

2. To a degree or point adequate. Live up to the principles professed.

UP with, raise; life; as, up with the fist; up with the timber.

UP is much used to modify the actions expressed by verbs. It is very often useful and necessary; very often useless.

To bear up to sustain.

To go up to ascend.

To lift up to raise.

To get up to rise from bed or a seat.

To bind up to bind together.

To blow up to inflate; to distend; to inflame.

To grow up to grow to maturity.

UP stream, from the mouth towards the head of a stream; against the stream; hence up is in a direction towards the head of a stream or river; as up the country.

UP sound, in the direction from the sea; opposed to down sound, that is, in the direction of the ebb tide.

UP is used elliptically for get up expressing a command or exhortation.

UP, let us be going. Judges 19:5.

UP, preposition From a lower to a higher place. Go up the hill.

Why 1828?

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It is a way for me to research word's that are now omitted from present day Dictionaries like Gods name

— MR (Tulsa, OK)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

ephemera

EPHEM'ERA, n. [L. from Gr. daily; a day.] A fever of one day's continuance only.

1. The Day-fly; strictly, a fly that lives one day only; but the word is applied also to insects that are very short-lived, whether they live several days or an hour only. There are several species.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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monte

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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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