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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [union]

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union

U'NION, n. [L. unio, to unite, from unus, one.]

1. The act of joining two or more things into one, and thus forming a compound body or a mixture; or the junction or coalition of things thus united. Union differs from connection, as it implies the bodies to be in contact, without an intervening body; whereas things may be connected by the intervention of a third body, as by a cord or chain.

One kingdom, joy and union without end.

2. Concord; agreement and conjunction of mind, will, affections or interest. Happy is the family where perfect union subsists between all its members.

3. The junction or united existence of spirit and matter; as the union of soul and body.

4. Among painters, a symmetry and agreement between the several parts of a painting.

5. In architecture, harmony between the colors in the materials of a building.

6. In ecclesiastical affairs, the combining or consolidating of two or more churches into one. This cannot be done without the consent of the bishop, the patron, and the incumbent. Union is by accession, when the united benefice becomes an accessory of the principal; by confusion, where the two titles are suppressed, and a new one created, including both; and by equality, where the two titles subsist, but are equal and independent.

7. States united. Thus the United States of America are sometimes call the Union.

8. A pearl. [L. unio. Not in use.]

Union, or Act of union, the act by which Scotland was united to England, or by which the two kingdoms were incorporated into one, in 1707.

Legislative union, the union of Great Britain and Ireland, in 1800.

Union by the first intention, in surgery, the process by which the opposite surfaces of recent wounds grow together and unite without suppuration, when they are kept in contact with each other; the result of a wonderful self-healing power in living bodies.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [union]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

U'NION, n. [L. unio, to unite, from unus, one.]

1. The act of joining two or more things into one, and thus forming a compound body or a mixture; or the junction or coalition of things thus united. Union differs from connection, as it implies the bodies to be in contact, without an intervening body; whereas things may be connected by the intervention of a third body, as by a cord or chain.

One kingdom, joy and union without end.

2. Concord; agreement and conjunction of mind, will, affections or interest. Happy is the family where perfect union subsists between all its members.

3. The junction or united existence of spirit and matter; as the union of soul and body.

4. Among painters, a symmetry and agreement between the several parts of a painting.

5. In architecture, harmony between the colors in the materials of a building.

6. In ecclesiastical affairs, the combining or consolidating of two or more churches into one. This cannot be done without the consent of the bishop, the patron, and the incumbent. Union is by accession, when the united benefice becomes an accessory of the principal; by confusion, where the two titles are suppressed, and a new one created, including both; and by equality, where the two titles subsist, but are equal and independent.

7. States united. Thus the United States of America are sometimes call the Union.

8. A pearl. [L. unio. Not in use.]

Union, or Act of union, the act by which Scotland was united to England, or by which the two kingdoms were incorporated into one, in 1707.

Legislative union, the union of Great Britain and Ireland, in 1800.

Union by the first intention, in surgery, the process by which the opposite surfaces of recent wounds grow together and unite without suppuration, when they are kept in contact with each other; the result of a wonderful self-healing power in living bodies.

UN-ION, n. [Fr. union; It. unione; L. unio, to unite, from unus, one.]

  1. The act of joining two or more things into one, and thus forming a compound body or a mixture; or the junction or coalition of things thus united. Union differs from connection, as it implies the bodies to be in contact, without an intervening body; whereas things may be connected by the intervention of a third body, as by a cord or chain. One kingdom, joy and union without end. Milton.
  2. Concord; agreement and conjunction of mind, will, affections or interest. Happy is the family where perfect union subsists between all its members.
  3. The junction or united existence of spirit and matter; as, the union of soul and body.
  4. Among painters, a symmetry and agreement between the several parts of a painting. Cyc.
  5. In architecture, harmony between the colors in the materials of a building. Cyc.
  6. In ecclesiastical affairs, the combining or consolidating of two or more churches into one. This can not be done without the consent of the bishop, the patron, and the incumbent. Union is by accession, when the united benefice becomes an accessory of the principal; by confusion, where the two titles are suppressed, and new one created, including both; and by equality, where the two titles subsist, but are equal and independent. Cyc.
  7. States united. Thus the United States of America are sometimes called the Union. Marshall. Hamilton.
  8. A pearl. [L. unio.] [Not in use.] Union, or Act of union, the net by which Scotland was united to England, or by which the two kingdoms were incorporated into one, in 1707. Legislative union, the union of Great Britain and Ireland, in 1800. Union by the first intention, in surgery, the process by which the opposite surfaces of recent wounds, when they are kept in contact with each other, grow together and unite without suppuration; the result of a wonderful self-healing power in living bodies. Cyc.

Un"ion
  1. The act of uniting or joining two or more things into one, or the state of being united or joined; junction; coalition; combination.

    * Union differs from connection, as it implies that the bodies are in contact, without an inter(?)ening body; whereas things may be connected by the in(?)(?)(?)vention of a third body, as by a cord or chain.

  2. Agreement and conjunction of mind, spirit, will, affections, or the like; harmony; concord.
  3. That which is united, or made one; something formed by a combination or coalition of parts or members; a confederation; a consolidated body; a league; as, the weavers have formed a union; trades unions have become very numerous; the United States of America are often called the Union.

    A. Hamilton.
  4. A textile fabric composed of two or more materials, as cotton, silk, wool, etc., woven together.
  5. A large, fine pearl.

    [Obs.]

    If they [pearls] be white, great, round, smooth, and weighty . . . our dainties and delicates here at Rome . . . call them unions, as a man would say "singular," and by themselves alone. Holland.

    In the cup an union shall he throw,
    Richer than that which four successive kings
    In Denmark's crown have worn.
    Shak.

  6. A device emblematic of union, used on a national flag or ensign, sometimes, as in the military standard of Great Britain, covering the whole field; sometimes, as in the flag of the United States, and the English naval and marine flag, occupying the upper inner corner, the rest of the flag being called the fly. Also, a flag having such a device; especially, the flag of Great Britain.

    * The union of the United States ensign is a cluster of white stars, denoting the union of the States, and, properly, equal in number to that of the States, displayed on a blue field; the fly being composed of alternate stripes of red and white. The union of the British ensign is the three crosses of St. George, St. Andrew, and St. Patrick in combination, denoting the union of England, Scotland and Ireland, displayed on a blue field in the national banner used on shore, on a red, white, or blue field in naval ensigns, and with a white border or fly in the merchant service.

  7. A joint or other connection uniting parts of machinery, or the like, as the elastic pipe of a tender connecting it with the feed pipe of a locomotive engine; especially, a pipe fitting for connecting pipes, or pipes and fittings, in such a way as to facilitate disconnection.
  8. A cask suspended on trunnions, in which fermentation is carried on.

    Hypostatic union (Theol.) See under Hypostatic. -- Latin union. See under Latin. -- Legislative Union (Eng. Hist.), the union of Great Britain and Ireland, which took place Jan. 1, 1801. -- Union, or Act of Union (Eng. Hist.), the act by which Scotland was united to England, or by which the two kingdoms were incorporated into one, in 1707. -- Union by the first, or second, intention. (Surg.) See To heal by the first, or second, intention, under Intention. -- Union down (Naut.), a signal of distress at sea made by reversing the flag, or turning its union downward. -- Union jack. (Naut.) See Jack, n., 10. -- Union joint. (Mech.) (a) A joint formed by means of a union. (b) A piece of pipe made in the form of the letter T.

    Syn. -- Unity; junction; connection; concord; alliance; coalition; combination; confederacy. -- Union, Unity. Union is the act of bringing two or more things together so as to make but one, or the state of being united into one. Unity is a state of simple oneness, either of essence, as the unity of God, or of action, feeling, etc., as unity of design, of affection, etc. Thus, we may speak of effecting a union of interests which shall result in a unity of labor and interest in securing a given object.

    One kingdom, joy, and union without end. Milton.

    [Man] is to . . . beget
    Like of his like, his image multiplied.
    In unity defective; which requires
    Collateral love, and dearest amity.
    Milton.

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Union

U'NION, noun [Latin unio, to unite, from unus, one.]

1. The act of joining two or more things into one, and thus forming a compound body or a mixture; or the junction or coalition of things thus united. union differs from connection, as it implies the bodies to be in contact, without an intervening body; whereas things may be connected by the intervention of a third body, as by a cord or chain.

One kingdom, joy and union without end.

2. Concord; agreement and conjunction of mind, will, affections or interest. Happy is the family where perfect union subsists between all its members.

3. The junction or united existence of spirit and matter; as the union of soul and body.

4. Among painters, a symmetry and agreement between the several parts of a painting.

5. In architecture, harmony between the colors in the materials of a building.

6. In ecclesiastical affairs, the combining or consolidating of two or more churches into one. This cannot be done without the consent of the bishop, the patron, and the incumbent. union is by accession, when the united benefice becomes an accessory of the principal; by confusion, where the two titles are suppressed, and a new one created, including both; and by equality, where the two titles subsist, but are equal and independent.

7. States united. Thus the United States of America are sometimes call the union

8. A pearl. [Latin unio. Not in use.]

Union, or Act of union the act by which Scotland was united to England, or by which the two kingdoms were incorporated into one, in 1707.

Legislative union the union of Great Britain and Ireland, in 1800.

Union by the first intention, in surgery, the process by which the opposite surfaces of recent wounds grow together and unite without suppuration, when they are kept in contact with each other; the result of a wonderful self-healing power in living bodies.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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hemachate

HEM'ACHATE, n. [Gr. blood, and agate.] A species of agate, of a blood color.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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