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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [triumph]

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triumph

TRI'UMPH, n. [L. triumphus.]

1. Among the ancient Romans, a pompous ceremony performed in honor of a victorious general, who was allowed to enter the city crowned, originally with laurel, but in later times with gold, bearing a truncheon in one hand and a branch of laurel in the other, riding in a chariot drawn by two white horses, and followed by the kings, princes and generals whom he had vanquished, loaded with chains and insulted by mimics and buffoons. The triumph was of two kinds, the greater and the less. The lesser triumph was granted for a victory over enemies of less considerable power, and was called an ovation.

2. State of being victorious.

Hercules from Spain

Arriv'd in triumph, from Geryon slain.

3. Victory; conquest.

The vain coquets the trifling triumphs boast.

4. Joy or exultation for success.

Great triumph and rejoicing was in heav'n.

5. A card that takes all others; now written trump, which see.

TRI'UMPH, v.i. To celebrate victory with pomp; to rejoice for victory.

How long shall the wicked triumph? Ps.94.

1. To obtain victory.

There fix thy faith, and triumph o'er the world.

Attir'd with stars, we shall forever sit

Triumphing over death.

2. In insult upon an advantage gained.

Let not my enemies triumph over me. Ps.25.

Sorrow on all the pack of you

That triumph thus upon my misery.

3. To be prosperous; to flourish.

Where commerce triumph'd on the favoring gales.

triumph over,to succeed in overcoming; to surmount; as, to triumph over all obstacles.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [triumph]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

TRI'UMPH, n. [L. triumphus.]

1. Among the ancient Romans, a pompous ceremony performed in honor of a victorious general, who was allowed to enter the city crowned, originally with laurel, but in later times with gold, bearing a truncheon in one hand and a branch of laurel in the other, riding in a chariot drawn by two white horses, and followed by the kings, princes and generals whom he had vanquished, loaded with chains and insulted by mimics and buffoons. The triumph was of two kinds, the greater and the less. The lesser triumph was granted for a victory over enemies of less considerable power, and was called an ovation.

2. State of being victorious.

Hercules from Spain

Arriv'd in triumph, from Geryon slain.

3. Victory; conquest.

The vain coquets the trifling triumphs boast.

4. Joy or exultation for success.

Great triumph and rejoicing was in heav'n.

5. A card that takes all others; now written trump, which see.

TRI'UMPH, v.i. To celebrate victory with pomp; to rejoice for victory.

How long shall the wicked triumph? Ps.94.

1. To obtain victory.

There fix thy faith, and triumph o'er the world.

Attir'd with stars, we shall forever sit

Triumphing over death.

2. In insult upon an advantage gained.

Let not my enemies triumph over me. Ps.25.

Sorrow on all the pack of you

That triumph thus upon my misery.

3. To be prosperous; to flourish.

Where commerce triumph'd on the favoring gales.

triumph over,to succeed in overcoming; to surmount; as, to triumph over all obstacles.


TRI'UMPH, n. [Fr. triomphe; It. trionfo; Sp. triunfo; L. triumphus; Gr. θριαμβος.]

  1. Among the ancient Romans, a pompous ceremony performed in honor of a victorious general, who was allowed to enter the city crowned, originally with laurel, but in later times with gold, bearing a truncheon in one hand and a branch of laurel in the other, riding in a chariot drawn by two white horses, and followed by the kings, princes, and generals whom he had vanquished, loaded with chains and insulted by mimics and buffoons. The triumph was of two kinds, the greater and the less. The lesser triumph was granted for a victory over enemies of less considerable power, and was called an ovation.
  2. State of being victorious. Hercules from Spain / Arriv'd in triumph, from Geryon slain. Dryden.
  3. Victory; conquest. The vain coquets the trifling triumphs boast. Logie.
  4. Joy or exultation for success. Great triumph and rejoicing was in heav'n. Milton.
  5. A card that takes all others; now written trump, – which see.

TRI'UMPH, v.i.

  1. To celebrate victory with pomp; to rejoice for victory. How long shall the wicked triumph? Ps. xciv.
  2. To obtain victory. There fix thy faith, and triumph o'er the world. Rowe. Attir'd with stars, we shall forever sit / Triumphing over death. Milton.
  3. To insult upon an advantage gained. Let not my enemies triumph over me. Ps. xxv. Sorrow on all the pack of you / That triumph thus upon my misery. Shak.
  4. To be prosperous; to flourish. Where commerce triumph'd on the favoring gales. Trumbull. To triumph over, to succeed in overcoming; to surmount; as, to triumph over all obstacles.

Tri"umph
  1. A magnificent and imposing ceremonial performed in honor of a general who had gained a decisive victory over a foreign enemy.

    * The general was allowed to enter the city crowned with a wreath of laurel, bearing a scepter in one hand, and a branch of laurel in the other, riding in a circular chariot, of a peculiar form, drawn by four horses. He was preceded by the senate and magistrates, musicians, the spoils, the captives in fetters, etc., and followed by his army on foot in marching order. The procession advanced in this manner to the Capitoline Hill, where sacrifices were offered, and victorious commander entertained with a public feast.

  2. To celebrate victory with pomp] to rejoice over success; to exult in an advantage gained; to exhibit exultation.

    How long shall the wicked triumph? Ps. xciv. 3.

    Sorrow on thee and all the pack of you
    That triumph thus upon my misery!
    Shak.

  3. To obtain a victory over; to prevail over; to conquer. Also, to cause to triumph.

    [Obs.]

    Two and thirty legions that awe
    All nations of the triumphed word.
    Massinger.

  4. Hence, any triumphal procession; a pompous exhibition; a stately show or pageant.

    [Obs.]

    Our daughter,
    In honor of whose birth these triumphs are,
    Sits here, like beauty's child.
    Shak.

  5. To obtain victory; to be successful; to prevail.

    Triumphing over death, and chance, and thee, O Time. Milton.

    On this occasion, however, genius triumphed. Macaulay.

  6. A state of joy or exultation for success.

    Great triumph and rejoicing was in heaven. Milton.

    Hercules from Spain
    Arrived in triumph, from Geryon slain.
    Dryden.

  7. To be prosperous; to flourish.

    Where commerce triumphed on the favoring gales. Trumbull.

  8. Success causing exultation; victory; conquest; as, the triumph of knowledge.
  9. To play a trump card.

    [Obs.] B. Jonson.
  10. A trump card; also, an old game at cards.

    [Obs.]
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Triumph

TRI'UMPH, noun [Latin triumphus.]

1. Among the ancient Romans, a pompous ceremony performed in honor of a victorious general, who was allowed to enter the city crowned, originally with laurel, but in later times with gold, bearing a truncheon in one hand and a branch of laurel in the other, riding in a chariot drawn by two white horses, and followed by the kings, princes and generals whom he had vanquished, loaded with chains and insulted by mimics and buffoons. The triumph was of two kinds, the greater and the less. The lesser triumph was granted for a victory over enemies of less considerable power, and was called an ovation.

2. State of being victorious.

Hercules from Spain

Arriv'd in triumph from Geryon slain.

3. Victory; conquest.

The vain coquets the trifling triumphs boast.

4. Joy or exultation for success.

Great triumph and rejoicing was in heav'n.

5. A card that takes all others; now written trump, which see.

TRI'UMPH, verb intransitive To celebrate victory with pomp; to rejoice for victory.

How long shall the wicked triumph? Psalms 94:3.

1. To obtain victory.

There fix thy faith, and triumph o'er the world.

Attir'd with stars, we shall forever sit

Triumphing over death.

2. In insult upon an advantage gained.

Let not my enemies triumph over me. Psalms 25:2.

Sorrow on all the pack of you

That triumph thus upon my misery.

3. To be prosperous; to flourish.

Where commerce triumph'd on the favoring gales.

triumph over, to succeed in overcoming; to surmount; as, to triumph over all obstacles.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

derivation

DERIVATION, n.

1. The act of deriving, drawing or receiving from a source; as the derivation of an estate from ancestors, or of profits from capital, or of truth or facts from antiquity.

2. In grammar, the drawing or tracing of a word from its root or original; as, derivation is from the L. Derivo, and the latter from rivus, a stream.

3. A drawing from, or turning aside from, a natural course or channel; as the derivation of water from its channel by lateral drains.

4. A drawing of humors from one part of the body to another; as the derivation of humors from the eye, by a blister on the neck.

5. The thing derived or deduced.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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