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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [train]

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train

TRAIN, v.t. [L. traho, to draw?]

1. To draw along.

In hollow cube he train'd

His devilish enginery.

2. Top draw; to entice; to allure.

If but twelve French

Were there in arms, they would be as a call

To train ten thousand English to their side.

3. To draw by artifice or stratagem.

O train me not, sweet mermaid,with thy note.

4. To draw from act to act by persuasion or promise.

We did train him on.

5. To exercise; to discipline; to teach and form by practice; as, to train the militia to the manual exercise; to train soldiers to the use of arms and to tactics. Abram armed his trained servants. Gen.14.

The warrior horse here bred he's taught to train.

6. To break, tame and accustom to draw; as oxen.

7. In gardening, to lead or direct and form to a wall or espalier; to form to a proper shape by growth, lopping or pruning; as, to train young trees.

8. In mining, to trace a lode or any mineral appearance to its head.

To train or train up, to educate; to teach; to form by instruction or practice; to bring up.

Train up a child in the way he should go,and when he is
old he will not depart from it. Prov.22.

The first christians were, by great hardships, trained

up for glory.

TRAIN, n. Artifice; stratagem of enticement.

Now to my charms,

And to my wily trains.

1. Something drawn along behind, the end of a gown, &c.; as the train of a gown or robe.

2. The tail of a fowl.

The train steers their flight, and turns their bodies,
like the rudder of a ship.

3. A retinue; a number of followers or attendants.

My train are men of choice and rarest parts.

The king;s daughter with a lovely train.

4. A series; a consecution or succession of connected things.

Rivers now stream and draw their humid train.

Other truths require a train of ideas placed in order.

--The train of ills our love would draw behind it.

5. Process; regular method; course. Things are now in a train for settlement.

If things were once in this train--our duty would take root in our nature.

6. A company in order; a procession.

Fairest of stars, last in the train of night.

7. The number of beats which a watch makes in any certain time.

8. A line of gunpowder, laid to lead fire to a charge, or to a quantity intended for execution.

Train of artillery, any number of cannon and mortars accompanying an army.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [train]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

TRAIN, v.t. [L. traho, to draw?]

1. To draw along.

In hollow cube he train'd

His devilish enginery.

2. Top draw; to entice; to allure.

If but twelve French

Were there in arms, they would be as a call

To train ten thousand English to their side.

3. To draw by artifice or stratagem.

O train me not, sweet mermaid,with thy note.

4. To draw from act to act by persuasion or promise.

We did train him on.

5. To exercise; to discipline; to teach and form by practice; as, to train the militia to the manual exercise; to train soldiers to the use of arms and to tactics. Abram armed his trained servants. Gen.14.

The warrior horse here bred he's taught to train.

6. To break, tame and accustom to draw; as oxen.

7. In gardening, to lead or direct and form to a wall or espalier; to form to a proper shape by growth, lopping or pruning; as, to train young trees.

8. In mining, to trace a lode or any mineral appearance to its head.

To train or train up, to educate; to teach; to form by instruction or practice; to bring up.

Train up a child in the way he should go,and when he is
old he will not depart from it. Prov.22.

The first christians were, by great hardships, trained

up for glory.

TRAIN, n. Artifice; stratagem of enticement.

Now to my charms,

And to my wily trains.

1. Something drawn along behind, the end of a gown, &c.; as the train of a gown or robe.

2. The tail of a fowl.

The train steers their flight, and turns their bodies,
like the rudder of a ship.

3. A retinue; a number of followers or attendants.

My train are men of choice and rarest parts.

The king;s daughter with a lovely train.

4. A series; a consecution or succession of connected things.

Rivers now stream and draw their humid train.

Other truths require a train of ideas placed in order.

--The train of ills our love would draw behind it.

5. Process; regular method; course. Things are now in a train for settlement.

If things were once in this train--our duty would take root in our nature.

6. A company in order; a procession.

Fairest of stars, last in the train of night.

7. The number of beats which a watch makes in any certain time.

8. A line of gunpowder, laid to lead fire to a charge, or to a quantity intended for execution.

Train of artillery, any number of cannon and mortars accompanying an army.


TRAIN, n.

  1. Artifice; stratagem of enticement. Now to my charms, / And to my wily trains. Milton.
  2. Something drawn along behind, the end of a gown, &c.; as, the train of a gown or robe.
  3. The tail of a fowl. The train steers their flight, and turns their bodies, like the rudder of a ship. Ray.
  4. A retinue; a number of followers or attendants. My train are men of choice and rarest parts. Shak. The king's daughter with a lovely train. Addison.
  5. A series; a consecution or succession of connected things. Rivers now stream and draw their humid train. Milton. Other truths require a train of ideas placed in order. Locke. The train of ills our love would draw behind it. Addison.
  6. Process; regular method; course. Things are now in a train for settlement. If things were once in this train – our duty would take root in our nature. Swift.
  7. A company in order; a procession. Fairest of stars, last in the train of night. Milton.
  8. The number of beats which a watch makes in any certain time. Cyc.
  9. A line of gunpowder, laid to lead fire to a charge, or to a quantity intended for execution. Train of artillery, any number of cannon and mortars accompanying an army.

TRAIN, v.t. [Fr. trainer; It. trainare, tranare, to draw or drag; Sp. traina, a train of gunpowder. Qu. drain, or is it a contracted word, from L. traho, to draw?]

  1. To draw along. In hollow cube he train'd / His devilish enginery. Milton.
  2. To draw; to entice; to allure. If but twelve French / Were there in arms, they would be as a call / To train ten thousand English to their side. Shak.
  3. To draw by artifice or stratagem. O train me not, sweet mermaid, with thy note. Shak.
  4. To draw from act to act by persuasion or promise. We did train him on. Shak.
  5. To exercise; to discipline; to teach and form by practice; as, to train the militia to the manual exercise; to train soldiers to the use of arms and to tactics. Abram armed his trained servants. Gen. xiv. The warrior horse here bred he's taught to train. Dryden.
  6. To break, tame and accustom to draw; as oxen.
  7. In gardening, to lead or direct and form to a wall or espalier; to form to a proper shape by growth, lopping or pruning; as, to train young trees.
  8. In mining, to trace a lode or any mineral appearance to its head. To train or train up, to educate; to teach; to form by instruction or practice; to bring up. Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it. Prov. xxii. The first Christians were, by great hardships, trained up for glory. Tillotson.

Train
  1. To be drilled in military exercises; to do duty in a military company.
  2. That which draws along; especially, persuasion, artifice, or enticement; allurement.

    [Obs.] "Now to my charms, and to my wily trains." Milton.
  3. A heavy long sleigh used in Canada for the transportation of merchandise, wood, and the like.
  4. To prepare by exercise, diet, instruction, etc., for any physical contest; as, to train for a boat race.
  5. Hence, something tied to a lure to entice a hawk; also, a trap for an animal; a snare.

    Halliwell.

    With cunning trains him to entrap un wares. Spenser.

  6. The aggregation of men, animals, and vehicles which accompany an army or one of its subdivisions, and transport its baggage, ammunition, supplies, and reserve materials of all kinds.
  7. That which is drawn along in the rear of, or after, something; that which is in the hinder part or rear.

    Specifically : --

    (a)

  8. A number of followers; a body of attendants; a retinue; a suite.

    The king's daughter with a lovely train. Addison.

    My train are men of choice and rarest parts. Shak.

  9. A consecution or succession of connected things; a series.

    "A train of happy sentiments." I. Watts.

    The train of ills our love would draw behind it. Addison.

    Rivers now
    Stream and perpetual draw their humid train.
    Milton.

    Other truths require a train of ideas placed in order. Locke.

  10. Regular method; process; course; order; as, things now in a train for settlement.

    If things were once in this train, . . . our duty would take root in our nature. Swift.

  11. The number of beats of a watch in any certain time.
  12. A line of gunpowder laid to lead fire to a charge, mine, or the like.
  13. A connected line of cars or carriages on a railroad.
  14. A heavy, long sleigh used in Canada for the transportation of merchandise, wood, and the like.
  15. A roll train; as, a 12- inch train.

    Roll train, or Train of rolls (Rolling Mill), a set of plain or grooved rolls for rolling metal into various forms by a series of consecutive operations. -- Train mile (Railroads), a unit employed in estimating running expenses, etc., being one of the total number of miles run by all the trains of a road, or system of roads, as within a given time, or for a given expenditure; -- called also mile run. -- Train of artillery, any number of cannon, mortars, etc., with the attendants and carriages which follow them into the field. Campbell (Dict. Mil. Sci.). -- Train of mechanism, a series of moving pieces, as wheels and pinions, each of which is follower to that which drives it, and driver to that which follows it. -- Train road, a slight railway for small cars, -- used for construction, or in mining. -- Train tackle (Naut.), a tackle for running guns in and out.

    Syn. -- Cars. -- Train, Cars. Train is the word universally used in England with reference to railroad traveling; as, I came in the morning train. In the United States, the phrase the cars has been extensively introduced in the room of train; as, the cars are late; I came in the cars. The English expression is obviously more appropriate, and is prevailing more and more among Americans, to the exclusion of the cars.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Train

TRAIN, verb transitive [Latin traho, to draw?]

1. To draw along.

In hollow cube he train'd

His devilish enginery.

2. Top draw; to entice; to allure.

If but twelve French

Were there in arms, they would be as a call

To train ten thousand English to their side.

3. To draw by artifice or stratagem.

O train me not, sweet mermaid, with thy note.

4. To draw from act to act by persuasion or promise.

We did train him on.

5. To exercise; to discipline; to teach and form by practice; as, to train the militia to the manual exercise; to train soldiers to the use of arms and to tactics. Abram armed his trained servants. Genesis 14:14.

The warrior horse here bred he's taught to train

6. To break, tame and accustom to draw; as oxen.

7. In gardening, to lead or direct and form to a wall or espalier; to form to a proper shape by growth, lopping or pruning; as, to train young trees.

8. In mining, to trace a lode or any mineral appearance to its head.

To train or train up, to educate; to teach; to form by instruction or practice; to bring up.

TRAIN up a child in the way he should go, and when he is

old he will not depart from it. Proverbs 22:6.

The first christians were, by great hardships, trained

up for glory.

TRAIN, noun Artifice; stratagem of enticement.

Now to my charms,

And to my wily trains.

1. Something drawn along behind, the end of a gown, etc.; as the train of a gown or robe.

2. The tail of a fowl.

The train steers their flight, and turns their bodies,

like the rudder of a ship.

3. A retinue; a number of followers or attendants.

My train are men of choice and rarest parts.

The king; s daughter with a lovely train

4. A series; a consecution or succession of connected things.

Rivers now stream and draw their humid train

Other truths require a train of ideas placed in order.

--The train of ills our love would draw behind it.

5. Process; regular method; course. Things are now in a train for settlement.

If things were once in this train--our duty would take root in our nature.

6. A company in order; a procession.

Fairest of stars, last in the train of night.

7. The number of beats which a watch makes in any certain time.

8. A line of gunpowder, laid to lead fire to a charge, or to a quantity intended for execution.

TRAIN of artillery, any number of cannon and mortars accompanying an army.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

high-day

HIGH-DAY, a. Fine; befitting a holiday.

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