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Friday - January 17, 2020

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [tire]

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tire

TIRE, n. [Heb. tur, a row or series.]

1. A tier; a row or rank. This is the same word as tier, differently written. [See Tier and Tour.]

2. A head dress; something that encompasses the head. [See Tiara.] Ezek.24. Is.3.

On her head she wore a tire of gold.

3. Furniture; apparatus; as the tire of war.

4. Attire. [See Attire.]

5. A band or hoop of iron, used to bind the fellies of wheels, to secure them from wearing and breaking; as cart-tire; wagon-tire. This tire however is generally formed of different pieces, and is not one entire hoop.

TIRE, v.t. To adorn; to attire; to dress; as the head. Obs. [See Attire.] 2 Kings 9.

TIRE, v.t. [L. tero.]

1. To weary; to fatigue; to exhaust the strength by toil or labor; as, to tire a horse or an ox. A long day's work in summer will tire the laborer.

Tir'd with toil, all hopes of safety past.

2. To weary; to fatigue; to exhaust the power of attending, or to exhaust patience with dullness or tediousness. A dull advocate may tire the court and jury, and injure his cause.

To tire out, to weary or fatigue to excess; to harass.

TIRE, v.i. To become weary; to be fatigued; to have the strength fail; to have the patience exhausted. A feeble body soon tires with hard labor.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [tire]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

TIRE, n. [Heb. tur, a row or series.]

1. A tier; a row or rank. This is the same word as tier, differently written. [See Tier and Tour.]

2. A head dress; something that encompasses the head. [See Tiara.] Ezek.24. Is.3.

On her head she wore a tire of gold.

3. Furniture; apparatus; as the tire of war.

4. Attire. [See Attire.]

5. A band or hoop of iron, used to bind the fellies of wheels, to secure them from wearing and breaking; as cart-tire; wagon-tire. This tire however is generally formed of different pieces, and is not one entire hoop.

TIRE, v.t. To adorn; to attire; to dress; as the head. Obs. [See Attire.] 2 Kings 9.

TIRE, v.t. [L. tero.]

1. To weary; to fatigue; to exhaust the strength by toil or labor; as, to tire a horse or an ox. A long day's work in summer will tire the laborer.

Tir'd with toil, all hopes of safety past.

2. To weary; to fatigue; to exhaust the power of attending, or to exhaust patience with dullness or tediousness. A dull advocate may tire the court and jury, and injure his cause.

To tire out, to weary or fatigue to excess; to harass.

TIRE, v.i. To become weary; to be fatigued; to have the strength fail; to have the patience exhausted. A feeble body soon tires with hard labor.


TIRE, n. [Heb. ורט tur, a row or series. See Class Dr, No. 24, 34, 35, 38, and No. 15.]

  1. A tier; a row or rank. This is the same word as tier, differently written. [See Tier and Tour.]
  2. A head dress; something that encompasses the head. [See Tiara.] Ezek. xxiv. Is. iii. On her head she wore a tire of gold. Spenser.
  3. Furniture; apparatus; as, the tire of war. Philips.
  4. Attire. [See Attire.]
  5. A band or hoop of iron, used to bind the fellies of wheels, to secure them from wearing and breaking; as, cart-tire; wagon-tire. This tire however is generally formed of different pieces, and is not one entire hoop.

TIRE, v.i.

To become weary; to be fatigued; to have the strength fail; to have the patience exhausted. A feeble body soon tires with hard labor.


TIRE, v.t.1

To adorn; to attire; to dress; as the head. [Obs.] [See Attire.] 2 Kings ix.


TIRE, v.t.2 [Sax. teorian, ateorian, geteorian, to fail. In D. teeren signifies to tar, to pine, to waste or consume, to digest; Gr. τειρω; L. tero. In Ir. and Gaelic, tor, toras, tuirse, is weariness; tuirsighim, to weary, to tire.]

  1. To weary; to fatigue; to exhaust the strength by toil or labor; as, to tire a horse or an ox. A long day's work in summer will tire the laborer. Tir'd with toil, all hopes of safety past. Dryden.
  2. To weary; to fatigue; to exhaust the power of attending, or to exhaust patience with dullness or tediousness. A dull advocate may tire the court and jury, and injure his cause. To tire out, to weary or fatigue to excess; to harass. Tickel.

Tire
  1. A tier, row, or rank. See Tier.

    [Obs.]

    In posture to displode their second tire
    Of thunder.
    Milton.

  2. Attire; apparel.

    [Archaic] "Having rich tire about you." Shak.
  3. To adorn; to attire; to dress.

    [Obs.]

    [Jezebel] painted her face, and tired her head. 2 Kings ix. 30.

  4. To seize, pull, and tear prey, as a hawk does.

    [Obs.]

    Even as an empty eagle, sharp by fast,
    Tires with her beak on feathers, flesh, and bone.
    Shak.

    Ye dregs of baseness, vultures among men,
    That tire upon the hearts of generous spirits.
    B. Jonson.

  5. To become weary; to be fatigued; to have the strength fail; to have the patience exhausted; as, a feeble person soon tires.
  6. To exhaust the strength of, as by toil or labor; to exhaust the patience of; to wear out (one's interest, attention, or the like); to weary; to fatigue; to jade.

    Shak.

    Tired with toil, all hopes of safety past. Dryden.

    To tire out, to weary or fatigue to exhaustion; to harass.

    Syn. -- To jade; weary; exhaust; harass. See Jade.

  7. A covering for the head; a headdress.

    On her head she wore a tire of gold. Spenser.

  8. To seize, rend, or tear something as prey; to be fixed upon, or engaged with, anything.

    [Obs.]

    Thus made she her remove,
    And left wrath tiring on her son.
    Chapman.

    Upon that were my thoughts tiring. Shak.

  9. A child's apron, covering the breast and having no sleeves; a pinafore; a tier.
  10. Furniture; apparatus; equipment.

    [Obs.] "The tire of war." Philips.
  11. A hoop or band, as of metal, on the circumference of the wheel of a vehicle, to impart strength and receive the wear.

    * The iron tire of a wagon wheel or cart wheel binds the fellies together. The tire of a locomotive or railroad-car wheel is a heavy hoop of iron or steel shrunk tightly upon an iron central part. The wheel of a bicycle has a tire of India rubber.

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Tire

TIRE, noun [Heb. tur, a row or series.]

1. A tier; a row or rank. This is the same word as tier, differently written. [See Tier and Tour.]

2. A head dress; something that encompasses the head. [See Tiara.] Ezekiel 24:17. Isaiah 3:18.

On her head she wore a tire of gold.

3. Furniture; apparatus; as the tire of war.

4. Attire. [See Attire.]

5. A band or hoop of iron, used to bind the fellies of wheels, to secure them from wearing and breaking; as cart-tire; wagon-tire. This tire however is generally formed of different pieces, and is not one entire hoop.

TIRE, verb transitive To adorn; to attire; to dress; as the head. obsolete [See Attire.] 2 Kings 9:30.

TIRE, verb transitive [Latin tero.]

1. To weary; to fatigue; to exhaust the strength by toil or labor; as, to tire a horse or an ox. A long day's work in summer will tire the laborer.

Tir'd with toil, all hopes of safety past.

2. To weary; to fatigue; to exhaust the power of attending, or to exhaust patience with dullness or tediousness. A dull advocate may tire the court and jury, and injure his cause.

To tire out, to weary or fatigue to excess; to harass.

TIRE, verb intransitive To become weary; to be fatigued; to have the strength fail; to have the patience exhausted. A feeble body soon tires with hard labor.

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It's importance shows me that it has stayed true to defining words and using the biblical references by not using slang as cultures form and change this dictionary does not. It also helps me in my school studies for ministry.

— Erica (Oak Park, IL)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

challenger

CHALLENGER, n.

1. One who challenges; one who invites to a single combat; one who calls on another by way of defiance.

2. One who claims superiority; one who claims any thing as his right, or makes pretensions to it.

3. One who calls a juror, or a jury, from the trial of his cause.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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