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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [time]

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time

TIME, n. [L.tempus; tempora, the falls of the head, also tempest, &c. See Tempest. Time is primarily equivalent to season; to the Gr.wpa in its original sense, opportunity, occasion, a fall, an event, that which comes.]

1. A particular portion or part of duration, whether past, present or future. The time was; the time has been; the time is; the time will be.

Lost time is never found again.

God, who at sundry times, and in divers manners, spoke in time past to the fathers by the prophets. Heb.1.

2. A proper time; a season.

There is a time to every purpose. Eccles.3.

The time of figs was not yet. Mark 11.

3. Duration.

The equal and uniform flux of time does not affect our senses.

Time is absolute or relative; absolute time is considered without any relation to bodies or their motions. Relative time is the sensible measure of any portion of duration, by means of motion. Thus the diurnal revolution of the sun measures a space of time or duration. Hence,

4. A space or measured portion of duration.

We were in Paris two months,and all that time enjoyed good health.

5. Life or duration, in reference to occupation. One man spends his time in idleness; another devotes all his time to useful purposes.

Believe me, your time is not your own; it belongs to God, to religion, to mankind.

6. Age; a part of duration distinct from other parts; as ancient times; modern times. The Spanish armada was defeated in the time of Queen Elizabeth.

7. Hour of travail.

She was within one month of her time.

8. Repetition; repeated performance, or mention with reference to repetition. The physician visits his patient three times in a day.

9. Repetition; doubling; addition of a number to itself; as, to double cloth four times; four times four amount to sixteen.

10. Measure of sounds in music; as common time, and treble time. In concerts,it is all important, that the performers keep time, or exact time.

11. The state of things at a particular period; as when we say, good times, or bad times, hard times,dull times for trade, &c. In this sense, the plural is generally used.

12. In grammar, tense.

In time, in good season; sufficiently early.

He arrived in time to see the exhibition.

1. A considerable space of duration; process or continuation of duration. You must wait patiently; you will in time recover your health and strength.

At times, at distinct intervals of duration. At times he reads; at other times, he rides.

The spirit began to move him at times. Judges 13.

Time enough, in season; early enough.

Stanley at Bosworth-field, came time enough to save his life.

To lose time, to delay.

1. To go too slow; as, a watch or clock loses time.

Apparent time, in astronomy, true solar time, regulated by the apparent motions of the sun.

Mean time, equated time, a mean or average of apparent time.

Siderial time, is that which is shown by the diurnal revolutions of the stars.

TIME, v.t. To adapt to the time or occasion; to bring, begin or perform at the proper season or time; as, the measure is well timed, or ill timed. No small part of political wisdom consists in knowing how to time propositions and measures.

Mercy is good, but kings mistake its timing.

1. To regulate as to time; as, he timed the stroke.

2. To measure; as in music or harmony.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [time]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

TIME, n. [L.tempus; tempora, the falls of the head, also tempest, &c. See Tempest. Time is primarily equivalent to season; to the Gr.wpa in its original sense, opportunity, occasion, a fall, an event, that which comes.]

1. A particular portion or part of duration, whether past, present or future. The time was; the time has been; the time is; the time will be.

Lost time is never found again.

God, who at sundry times, and in divers manners, spoke in time past to the fathers by the prophets. Heb.1.

2. A proper time; a season.

There is a time to every purpose. Eccles.3.

The time of figs was not yet. Mark 11.

3. Duration.

The equal and uniform flux of time does not affect our senses.

Time is absolute or relative; absolute time is considered without any relation to bodies or their motions. Relative time is the sensible measure of any portion of duration, by means of motion. Thus the diurnal revolution of the sun measures a space of time or duration. Hence,

4. A space or measured portion of duration.

We were in Paris two months,and all that time enjoyed good health.

5. Life or duration, in reference to occupation. One man spends his time in idleness; another devotes all his time to useful purposes.

Believe me, your time is not your own; it belongs to God, to religion, to mankind.

6. Age; a part of duration distinct from other parts; as ancient times; modern times. The Spanish armada was defeated in the time of Queen Elizabeth.

7. Hour of travail.

She was within one month of her time.

8. Repetition; repeated performance, or mention with reference to repetition. The physician visits his patient three times in a day.

9. Repetition; doubling; addition of a number to itself; as, to double cloth four times; four times four amount to sixteen.

10. Measure of sounds in music; as common time, and treble time. In concerts,it is all important, that the performers keep time, or exact time.

11. The state of things at a particular period; as when we say, good times, or bad times, hard times,dull times for trade, &c. In this sense, the plural is generally used.

12. In grammar, tense.

In time, in good season; sufficiently early.

He arrived in time to see the exhibition.

1. A considerable space of duration; process or continuation of duration. You must wait patiently; you will in time recover your health and strength.

At times, at distinct intervals of duration. At times he reads; at other times, he rides.

The spirit began to move him at times. Judges 13.

Time enough, in season; early enough.

Stanley at Bosworth-field, came time enough to save his life.

To lose time, to delay.

1. To go too slow; as, a watch or clock loses time.

Apparent time, in astronomy, true solar time, regulated by the apparent motions of the sun.

Mean time, equated time, a mean or average of apparent time.

Siderial time, is that which is shown by the diurnal revolutions of the stars.

TIME, v.t. To adapt to the time or occasion; to bring, begin or perform at the proper season or time; as, the measure is well timed, or ill timed. No small part of political wisdom consists in knowing how to time propositions and measures.

Mercy is good, but kings mistake its timing.

1. To regulate as to time; as, he timed the stroke.

2. To measure; as in music or harmony.

TIME, n. [Sax. tim, tima, time in general; Dan. time, Sw. timme, an hour; L. tempus; It. and Port. tempo; Sp. tiempo; Fr. temps, time in general; all from the root of the Sw. tima, to happen, to come, to befall, but the root in some of its applications, must have signified to rush with violence. Hence the sense of temples, L. tempora, the falls of the head, also tempest, &c. See Tempest. Time is primarily equivalent to season; to the Gr. ὡρα in its original sense, opportunity, occasion, a fall, an event, that which comes.]

  1. A particular portion or part of duration, whether past, present or future. The time was; the time has been; the time is; the time will be. Lost time is never found again. Franklin. God, who at sundry times, and in divers manners, spoke in times past to the fathers by the prophets. Heb. i.
  2. A proper time; a season. There is a time to every purpose. Eccles. iii. The time of figs was not yet. Mark. xi.
  3. Duration. The equal and uniform flux of time does not affect our senses. Cyc. Time is absolute or relative; absolute time is considered without any relation to bodies or their motions. Relative time is the sensible measure of any portion of duration, by means of motion. Thus the diurnal revolution of the sun measures a space of time or duration. Hence,
  4. A space or measured portion of duration. We were in Paris two months, and all that time enjoyed good health.
  5. Life or duration in reference to occupation. One man spends his time in idleness; another devotes all his time to useful purposes. Believe me, your time is not your own; it belongs to God, to religion, to mankind. Buckminster.
  6. Age; a part of duration distinct from other parts; as, ancient times; modern times. The Spanish armada was defeated in the time of Queen Elizabeth.
  7. Hour of travail. She was within one mouth of her time. Clarendon.
  8. Repetition; repeated performance, or mention with reference to repetition. The physician visits his patient three times in a day.
  9. Repetition; doubling; addition of a number to itself; as, to double cloth four times; four times four amount to sixteen.
  10. Measure of sounds in music; as, common time, and treble time. In concerts, it is all important that the performers keep time, or exact time.
  11. The state of things at a particular period; as when we say, good times, or bad times, hard times, dull times for trade, &c. In this sense, the plural is generally used.
  12. The present life; as, in time or eternity.
  13. In grammar, tense. In time, in good season; sufficiently early. He arrived in time to see the exhibition. #2. A considerable space of duration; process or continuation of duration. You must wait patiently; you will in time recover your health and strength. At times, at distinct intervals of duration. At times he reads; at other times he rides. The spirit began to move him at times. Judges xiii. Time enough, in season; early enough. Stanley at Bosworth-field, came time enough to save his life. Bacon. To lose time, to delay. #2. To go too slow; as, a watch or clock loses time. Apparent time, in astronomy, true solar time, regulated by the apparent motions of the sun. Mean time, equated time, a mean or average of apparent time. Sidereal time, is that which is shown by the apparent diurnal revolutions of the stars.

TIME, v.t.

  1. To adapt to the time or occasion; to bring, begin, or perform at the proper season or time; as, the measure is well timed, or ill timed. No small part of political wisdom consists in knowing how to time propositions and measures. Mercy is good, but kings mistake its timing. Dryden.
  2. To regulate as to time; as, he timed the stroke. Addison.
  3. To measure; as in music or harmony. Shak.

Time
  1. Duration, considered independently of any system of measurement or any employment of terms which designate limited portions thereof.

    The time wasteth [i. e. passes away] night and day. Chaucer.

    I know of no ideas . . . that have a better claim to be accounted simple and original than those of space and time. Reid.

  2. To appoint the time for] to bring, begin, or perform at the proper season or time; as, he timed his appearance rightly.

    There is no greater wisdom than well to time the beginnings and onsets of things. Bacon.

  3. To keep or beat time; to proceed or move in time.

    With oar strokes timing to their song. Whittier.

  4. A particular period or part of duration, whether past, present, or future; a point or portion of duration; as, the time was, or has been; the time is, or will be.

    God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets. Heb. i. 1.

  5. To regulate as to time; to accompany, or agree with, in time of movement.

    Who overlooked the oars, and timed the stroke. Addison.

    He was a thing of blood, whose every motion
    Was timed with dying cries.
    Shak.

  6. To pass time; to delay.

    [Obs.]
  7. The period at which any definite event occurred, or person lived; age; period; era; as, the Spanish Armada was destroyed in the time of Queen Elizabeth; -- often in the plural; as, ancient times; modern times.
  8. To ascertain or record the time, duration, or rate of; as, to time the speed of horses, or hours for workmen.
  9. The duration of one's life; the hours and days which a person has at his disposal.

    Believe me, your time is not your own; it belongs to God, to religion, to mankind. Buckminster.

  10. To measure, as in music or harmony.
  11. A proper time; a season; an opportunity.

    There is . . . a time to every purpose. Eccl. iii. 1.

    The time of figs was not yet. Mark xi. 13.

  12. Hour of travail, delivery, or parturition.

    She was within one month of her time. Clarendon.

  13. Performance or occurrence of an action or event, considered with reference to repetition; addition of a number to itself; repetition; as, to double cloth four times; four times four, or sixteen.

    Summers three times eight save one. Milton.

  14. The present life; existence in this world as contrasted with immortal life; definite, as contrasted with infinite, duration.

    Till time and sin together cease. Keble.

  15. Tense.
  16. The measured duration of sounds; measure; tempo; rate of movement; rhythmical division; as, common or triple time; the musician keeps good time.

    Some few lines set unto a solemn time. Beau. *** Fl.

    &fist] Time is often used in the formation of compounds, mostly self-explaining; as, time-battered, time-beguiling, time-consecrated, time-consuming, time-enduring, time-killing, time-sanctioned, time-scorner, time-wasting, time-worn, etc.

    Absolute time, time irrespective of local standards or epochs; as, all spectators see a lunar eclipse at the same instant of absolute time. -- Apparent time, the time of day reckoned by the sun, or so that 12 o'clock at the place is the instant of the transit of the sun's center over the meridian. - - Astronomical time, mean solar time reckoned by counting the hours continuously up to twenty-four from one noon to the next. -- At times, at distinct intervals of duration; now and then; as, at times he reads, at other times he rides. -- Civil time, time as reckoned for the purposes of common life in distinct periods, as years, months, days, hours, etc., the latter, among most modern nations, being divided into two series of twelve each, and reckoned, the first series from midnight to noon, the second, from noon to midnight. -- Common time (Mil.), the ordinary time of marching, in which ninety steps, each twenty-eight inches in length, are taken in one minute. -- Equation of time. See under Equation, n. -- In time. (a) In good season; sufficiently early; as, he arrived in time to see the exhibition. (b) After a considerable space of duration; eventually; finally; as, you will in time recover your health and strength. -- Mean time. See under 4th Mean. -- Quick time (Mil.), time of marching, in which one hundred and twenty steps, each thirty inches in length, are taken in one minute. -- Sidereal time. See under Sidereal. -- Standard time, the civil time that has been established by law or by general usage over a region or country. In England the standard time is Greenwich mean solar time. In the United States and Canada four kinds of standard time have been adopted by the railroads and accepted by the people, viz., Eastern, Central, Mountain, and Pacific time, corresponding severally to the mean local times of the 75th, 90th, 105th, and 120th meridians west from Greenwich, and being therefore five, six, seven, and eight hours slower than Greenwich time. -- Time ball, a ball arranged to drop from the summit of a pole, to indicate true midday time, as at Greenwich Observatory, England. Nichol. -- Time bargain (Com.), a contract made for the sale or purchase of merchandise, or of stock in the public funds, at a certain time in the future. -- Time bill. Same as Time-table. [Eng.] -- Time book, a book in which is kept a record of the time persons have worked. -- Time detector, a timepiece provided with a device for registering and indicating the exact time when a watchman visits certain stations in his beat. -- Time enough, in season; early enough. "Stanly at Bosworth field, . . . came time enough to save his life." Bacon. -- Time fuse, a fuse, as for an explosive projectile, which can be so arranged as to ignite the charge at a certain definite interval after being itself ignited. -- Time immemorial, or Time out of mind. (Eng. Law) See under Immemorial. -- Time lock, a lock having clockwork attached, which, when wound up, prevents the bolt from being withdrawn when locked, until a certain interval of time has elapsed. -- Time of day, salutation appropriate to the times of the day, as "good morning," "good evening," and the like; greeting. -- To kill time. See under Kill, v. t. -- To make time. (a) To gain time. (b) To occupy or use (a certain) time in doing something; as, the trotting horse made fast time. -- To move, run, or go, against time, to move, run, or go a given distance without a competitor, in the quickest possible time; or, to accomplish the greatest distance which can be passed over in a given time; as, the horse is to run against time. -- True time. (a) Mean time as kept by a clock going uniformly. (b) (Astron.) Apparent time as reckoned from the transit of the sun's center over the meridian.

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Time

TIME, noun [Latin tempus; tempora, the falls of the head, also tempest, etc. See Tempest. time is primarily equivalent to season; to the Gr.wpa in its original sense, opportunity, occasion, a fall, an event, that which comes.]

1. A particular portion or part of duration, whether past, present or future. The time was; the time has been; the time is; the time will be.

Lost time is never found again.

God, who at sundry times, and in divers manners, spoke in time past to the fathers by the prophets. Hebrews 1:1.

2. A proper time; a season.

There is a time to every purpose. Ecclesiastes 3:1.

The time of figs was not yet. Mark 11:13.

3. Duration.

The equal and uniform flux of time does not affect our senses.

TIME is absolute or relative; absolute time is considered without any relation to bodies or their motions. Relative time is the sensible measure of any portion of duration, by means of motion. Thus the diurnal revolution of the sun measures a space of time or duration. Hence,

4. A space or measured portion of duration.

We were in Paris two months, and all that time enjoyed good health.

5. Life or duration, in reference to occupation. One man spends his time in idleness; another devotes all his time to useful purposes.

Believe me, your time is not your own; it belongs to God, to religion, to mankind.

6. Age; a part of duration distinct from other parts; as ancient times; modern times. The Spanish armada was defeated in the time of Queen Elizabeth.

7. Hour of travail.

She was within one month of her time

8. Repetition; repeated performance, or mention with reference to repetition. The physician visits his patient three times in a day.

9. Repetition; doubling; addition of a number to itself; as, to double cloth four times; four times four amount to sixteen.

10. Measure of sounds in music; as common time and treble time In concerts, it is all important, that the performers keep time or exact time

11. The state of things at a particular period; as when we say, good times, or bad times, hard times, dull times for trade, etc. In this sense, the plural is generally used.

12. In grammar, tense.

In time in good season; sufficiently early.

He arrived in time to see the exhibition.

1. A considerable space of duration; process or continuation of duration. You must wait patiently; you will in time recover your health and strength.

At times, at distinct intervals of duration. At times he reads; at other times, he rides.

The spirit began to move him at times. Judges 13:23.

TIME enough, in season; early enough.

Stanley at Bosworth-field, came time enough to save his life.

To lose time to delay.

1. To go too slow; as, a watch or clock loses time

Apparent time in astronomy, true solar time regulated by the apparent motions of the sun.

Mean time equated time a mean or average of apparent time

Siderial time is that which is shown by the diurnal revolutions of the stars.

TIME, verb transitive To adapt to the time or occasion; to bring, begin or perform at the proper season or time; as, the measure is well timed, or ill timed. No small part of political wisdom consists in knowing how to time propositions and measures.

Mercy is good, but kings mistake its timing.

1. To regulate as to time; as, he timed the stroke.

2. To measure; as in music or harmony.

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importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

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He believes himself a man of importance.

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