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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [tide]

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tide

TIDE, n.

1. Time; season.

Which, at the appointed tide,

Each one did make his bride.

[This sense is obsolete.]

2. The flow of the water in the ocean and seas, twice in a little more than twenty four hours; the flux and reflux, or ebb and flow. We commonly distinguish the flow or rising of the water by the name of flood-tide, and the reflux by that of ebb-tide. There is much less tide or rise of water in the main ocean, at a distance from land, than there is at the shore, and in sounds and bays.

3. Stream; course; current; as the tide of the times.

Time's ungentle tide.

4. Favorable course.

There is a tide in the affairs of men,

Which taken at the flood, leads on to fortune.

5. Violent confluence. [Not in use.]

6. Among miners, the period of twelve hours.

7. Current; flow of blood.

And life's red tide runs ebbing from the wound.

TIDE, v.t. To drive with the stream.

TIDE, v.i. To work in or out of a river or harbor by favor of the tide, and anchor when it becomes adverse.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [tide]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

TIDE, n.

1. Time; season.

Which, at the appointed tide,

Each one did make his bride.

[This sense is obsolete.]

2. The flow of the water in the ocean and seas, twice in a little more than twenty four hours; the flux and reflux, or ebb and flow. We commonly distinguish the flow or rising of the water by the name of flood-tide, and the reflux by that of ebb-tide. There is much less tide or rise of water in the main ocean, at a distance from land, than there is at the shore, and in sounds and bays.

3. Stream; course; current; as the tide of the times.

Time's ungentle tide.

4. Favorable course.

There is a tide in the affairs of men,

Which taken at the flood, leads on to fortune.

5. Violent confluence. [Not in use.]

6. Among miners, the period of twelve hours.

7. Current; flow of blood.

And life's red tide runs ebbing from the wound.

TIDE, v.t. To drive with the stream.

TIDE, v.i. To work in or out of a river or harbor by favor of the tide, and anchor when it becomes adverse.


TIDE, n. [Sax. tidan, to happen; tid, time, season, opportunity, an hour; G. zeit; D. tyd; Sw. and Dan. tid. This word is from a root that signifies to come, to happen, or to fall or rush, as in betide; corresponding in sense with time, season, hour, opportunity. Tid, time, is the fall, the occasion, the event. Its original meaning is entirely obsolete, except in composition, as in Shrovetide, Whitsuntide.]

  1. Time, season. Which, at the appointed tide, / Each one did make his bride. Spenser. [This sense is obsolete.]
  2. The flow of the water in the ocean and seas, twice in a little more than twenty-four hours; the flux and reflux, or ebb and flow. We commonly distinguish the flow or rising of the water by the name of flood-tide, and the reflux by that of ebb-tide. There is much less tide or rise of water in the main ocean, at a distance from land, than there is at the shore, and in sounds and bays.
  3. Stream; course; current; as, the tide of the times. Time's ungentle tide. Byron.
  4. Favorable course. There is a tide in the aiming of men, / Which taken at the flood, leads on to fortune. Shak.
  5. Violent confluence. [Not in use.] Bacon.
  6. Among miners, the period of twelve hours. Cyc.
  7. Current; flow of blood. And life's red tide runs ebbing from the wound. Battle of Frogs and Mice.

TIDE, v.i.

To work in or out of a river or harbor by favor of the tide, and anchor when it becomes adverse. Mar. Dict.


TIDE, v.t.

To drive with the stream. Dryden.


Tide
  1. Time; period; season.

    [Obsoles.] "This lusty summer's tide." Chaucer.

    And rest their weary limbs a tide. Spenser.

    Which, at the appointed tide,
    Each one did make his bride.
    Spenser.

    At the tide of Christ his birth. Fuller.

  2. To cause to float with the tide; to drive or carry with the tide or stream.

    They are tided down the stream. Feltham.

  3. To betide; to happen.

    [Obs.]

    What should us tide of this new law? Chaucer.

  4. The alternate rising and falling of the waters of the ocean, and of bays, rivers, etc., connected therewith. The tide ebbs and flows twice in each lunar day, or the space of a little more than twenty-four hours. It is occasioned by the attraction of the sun and moon (the influence of the latter being three times that of the former), acting unequally on the waters in different parts of the earth, thus disturbing their equilibrium. A high tide upon one side of the earth is accompanied by a high tide upon the opposite side. Hence, when the sun and moon are in conjunction or opposition, as at new moon and full moon, their action is such as to produce a greater than the usual tide, called the spring tide, as represented in the cut. When the moon is in the first or third quarter, the sun's attraction in part counteracts the effect of the moon's attraction, thus producing under the moon a smaller tide than usual, called the neap tide.

    * The flow or rising of the water is called flood tide, and the reflux, ebb tide.

  5. To pour a tide or flood.
  6. A stream; current; flood; as, a tide of blood.

    "Let in the tide of knaves once more; my cook and I'll provide." Shak.
  7. To work into or out of a river or harbor by drifting with the tide and anchoring when it becomes adverse.
  8. Tendency or direction of causes, influences, or events; course; current.

    There is a tide in the affairs of men,
    Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune.
    Shak.

  9. Violent confluence.

    [Obs.] Bacon.
  10. The period of twelve hours.

    Atmospheric tides, tidal movements of the atmosphere similar to those of the ocean, and produced in the same manner by the attractive forces of the sun and moon. -- Inferior tide. See under Inferior, a. -- To work double tides. See under Work, v. t. -- Tide day, the interval between the occurrences of two consecutive maxima of the resultant wave at the same place. Its length varies as the components of sun and moon waves approach to, or recede from, one another. A retardation from this cause is called the lagging of the tide, while the acceleration of the recurrence of high water is termed the priming of the tide. See Lag of the tide, under 2d Lag. -- Tide dial, a dial to exhibit the state of the tides at any time. -- Tide gate. (a) An opening through which water may flow freely when the tide sets in one direction, but which closes automatically and prevents the water from flowing in the other direction. (b) (Naut.) A place where the tide runs with great velocity, as through a gate. -- Tide gauge, a gauge for showing the height of the tide; especially, a contrivance for registering the state of the tide continuously at every instant of time. Brande *** C. -- Tide lock, a lock situated between an inclosed basin, or a canal, and the tide water of a harbor or river, when they are on different levels, so that craft can pass either way at all times of the tide] -- called also guard lock. -- Tide mill. (a) A mill operated by the tidal currents. (b) A mill for clearing lands from tide water. -- Tide rip, a body of water made rough by the conflict of opposing tides or currents. -- Tide table, a table giving the time of the rise and fall of the tide at any place. - - Tide water, water affected by the flow of the tide; hence, broadly, the seaboard. -- Tide wave, or Tidal wave, the swell of water as the tide moves. That of the ocean is called primitive; that of bays or channels derivative. Whewell. -- Tide wheel, a water wheel so constructed as to be moved by the ebb or flow of the tide.

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tide

TIDE, n.

1. Time; season.

Which, at the appointed tide,

Each one did make his bride.

[This sense is obsolete.]

2. The flow of the water in the ocean and seas, twice in a little more than twenty four hours; the flux and reflux, or ebb and flow. We commonly distinguish the flow or rising of the water by the name of flood-tide, and the reflux by that of ebb-tide. There is much less tide or rise of water in the main ocean, at a distance from land, than there is at the shore, and in sounds and bays.

3. Stream; course; current; as the tide of the times.

Time's ungentle tide.

4. Favorable course.

There is a tide in the affairs of men,

Which taken at the flood, leads on to fortune.

5. Violent confluence. [Not in use.]

6. Among miners, the period of twelve hours.

7. Current; flow of blood.

And life's red tide runs ebbing from the wound.

TIDE, v.t. To drive with the stream.

TIDE, v.i. To work in or out of a river or harbor by favor of the tide, and anchor when it becomes adverse.

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Classic definitions of words.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

confined

CONFI'NED, pp. Restrained within limits; imprisoned; limited; secluded; close.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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