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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [temper]

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temper

TEM'PER, v.t. [L. tempero, to mix or moderate]

1. To mix so that one part qualifies the other; to bring to a moderate state; as, to temper justice with mercy.

2. To compound; to form by mixture; to qualify, as by an ingredient; or in general, to mix, unite or combine two or more things so as to reduce the excess of the qualities of either, and bring the whole to the desired consistence or state.

Thou shalt make it a perfume, a confection after the art of the apothecary, tempered together, pure and holy. Ex.30.

3. To unite in due proportion; to render symmetrical; to adjust, as parts to each other.

God hath tempered the body together. 1 Cor.12.

4. To accommodate; to modify.

Thy sustenance serving to the appetite of the eater, tempered itself to every man's liking.

5. To soften; to mollify; to assuage; to soothe; to calm; to reduce any violence or excess.

Solon--labored to temper the warlike courages of the Athenians with sweet delights of learning.

Woman! nature made thee

To temper man; we had been brutes without you.

6. To form to a proper degree of hardness; as, to temper iron or steel.

The temper'd metals clash, and yield a silver sound.

7. To govern; a Latinism. [Not in use.]

8. In music, to modify or amend a false or imperfect concord by transferring to it a part of the beauty of a perfect one, that is, by dividing the tones.

TEM'PER, n. Due mixture of different qualities; or the state of any compound substance which results from the mixture of various ingredients; as the temper of mortar.

1. Constitution of body. [In this sense we more generally use temperament.]

2. Disposition of mind; the constitution of the mind, particularly with regard to the passions and affections; as a calm temper; a hasty temper; a fretful temper. This is applicable to beasts as well as to man.

Remember with what mild

And gracious temper he both heard and judg'd.

3. Calmness of mind; moderation.

Restore yourselves unto your tempers, fathers.

To fall with dignity, with temper rise.

4. Heat of mind or passion; irritation. The boy showed a great deal of temper when I reproved him.

So we say, a man of violent temper, when we speak of his irritability. [This use of the word is common, though a deviation from its original and genuine meaning.]

5. The state of a metal, particularly as to its hardness; as the temper of iron or steel.

6. Middle course; mean or medium.

7. In sugar works, white lime or other substance stirred into a clarifier filled with cane-juice, to neutralize the super abundant acid.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [temper]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

TEM'PER, v.t. [L. tempero, to mix or moderate]

1. To mix so that one part qualifies the other; to bring to a moderate state; as, to temper justice with mercy.

2. To compound; to form by mixture; to qualify, as by an ingredient; or in general, to mix, unite or combine two or more things so as to reduce the excess of the qualities of either, and bring the whole to the desired consistence or state.

Thou shalt make it a perfume, a confection after the art of the apothecary, tempered together, pure and holy. Ex.30.

3. To unite in due proportion; to render symmetrical; to adjust, as parts to each other.

God hath tempered the body together. 1 Cor.12.

4. To accommodate; to modify.

Thy sustenance serving to the appetite of the eater, tempered itself to every man's liking.

5. To soften; to mollify; to assuage; to soothe; to calm; to reduce any violence or excess.

Solon--labored to temper the warlike courages of the Athenians with sweet delights of learning.

Woman! nature made thee

To temper man; we had been brutes without you.

6. To form to a proper degree of hardness; as, to temper iron or steel.

The temper'd metals clash, and yield a silver sound.

7. To govern; a Latinism. [Not in use.]

8. In music, to modify or amend a false or imperfect concord by transferring to it a part of the beauty of a perfect one, that is, by dividing the tones.

TEM'PER, n. Due mixture of different qualities; or the state of any compound substance which results from the mixture of various ingredients; as the temper of mortar.

1. Constitution of body. [In this sense we more generally use temperament.]

2. Disposition of mind; the constitution of the mind, particularly with regard to the passions and affections; as a calm temper; a hasty temper; a fretful temper. This is applicable to beasts as well as to man.

Remember with what mild

And gracious temper he both heard and judg'd.

3. Calmness of mind; moderation.

Restore yourselves unto your tempers, fathers.

To fall with dignity, with temper rise.

4. Heat of mind or passion; irritation. The boy showed a great deal of temper when I reproved him.

So we say, a man of violent temper, when we speak of his irritability. [This use of the word is common, though a deviation from its original and genuine meaning.]

5. The state of a metal, particularly as to its hardness; as the temper of iron or steel.

6. Middle course; mean or medium.

7. In sugar works, white lime or other substance stirred into a clarifier filled with cane-juice, to neutralize the super abundant acid.

TEM'PER, n.

  1. Due mixture of different qualities; or the state of any compound substance which results from the mixture of various ingredients; as, the temper of mortar.
  2. Constitution of body. [In this sense we more generally use temperament.]
  3. Disposition of mind; the constitution of the mind, particularly with regard to the passions and affections; as, a calm temper; a hasty temper; a fretful temper. This is applicable to beasts as well as to man. Remember with what mild / And gracious temper he both heard and judg'd. Milton.
  4. Calmness of mind; moderation. Restore yourselves to your tempers, fathers. B. Jonson. To fall with dignity, with temper rise. Pope.
  5. Heat of mind or passion; irritation. The boy showed a great deal of temper when I reproved him. So we say, a man of violent temper, when we speak of his irritability. [This use of the word is common, though a deviation from its original and genuine meaning.]
  6. The state of a metal, particularly as to its hardness; as, the temper of iron or steel. Sharp.
  7. Middle course; mean or medium. Swift.
  8. In sugar works, white lime or other substance stirred into a clarifier filled with cane-juice, to neutralize the superabundant acid. Edwards, W. Indies.

TEM'PER, v.t. [L. tempero, to mix or moderate; It. temperare; Sp. templar, to temper, to soften or moderate, to anneal, as glass, to tune an instrument, to trim sails to the wind; Fr. temperer, to temper, allay or abate; W. tymperu, to temper, to mollify; tym, space; tymp, enlargement, birth, season. The latter unites this word with time. The sense of this word is probably from making seasonable, or timely; hence to make suitable.]

  1. To mix so that one part qualifies the other; to bring to a moderate state; as, to temper justice with mercy. Milton.
  2. To compound; to form by mixture; to qualify, as by an ingredient; or in general, to mix, unite or combine two or more things so as to reduce the excess of the qualities of either, and bring the whole to the desired consistence or state. Thou shalt make it a perfume, a confection after the art of the apothecary, tempered together, pure and holy. Exod. xxx.
  3. To unite in due proportion; to render symmetrical; to adjust, as parts to each other. God hath tempered the body together. 1 Cor. xii.
  4. To accommodate; to modify. Thy sustenance serving to the appetite of the eater, tempered itself to every man's liking. Wisdom.
  5. To soften; to mollify; to assuage; to soothe; to calm; to reduce any violence or excess. Solon – labored to temper the warlike courages of the Athenians with sweet delights of learning. Spenser. Woman! nature made thee, / To temper man; we had been brutes without you. Otway.
  6. To form to a proper degree of hardness; as, to temper iron or steel. The temper'd metals clash, and yield a silver sound. Dryden.
  7. To govern; a Latinism. [Not in use.] Spenser.
  8. In music, to modify or amend a false or imperfect concord by transferring to it a part of the beauty of a perfect one, that is, by dividing the tones. Cyc.

Tem"per
  1. To mingle in due proportion; to prepare by combining; to modify, as by adding some new element; to qualify, as by an ingredient; hence, to soften; to mollify; to assuage; to soothe; to calm.

    Puritan austerity was so tempered by Dutch indifference, that mercy itself could not have dictated a milder system. Bancroft.

    Woman! lovely woman! nature made thee
    To temper man: we had been brutes without you.
    Otway.

    But thy fire
    Shall be more tempered, and thy hope far higher.
    Byron.

    She [the Goddess of Justice] threw darkness and clouds about her, that tempered the light into a thousand beautiful shades and colors. Addison.

  2. The state of any compound substance which results from the mixture of various ingredients; due mixture of different qualities; just combination; as, the temper of mortar.
  3. To accord; to agree; to act and think in conformity.

    [Obs.] Shak.
  4. To fit together; to adjust; to accomodate.

    Thy sustenance . . . serving to the appetite of the eater, tempered itself to every man's liking. Wisdom xvi. 21.

  5. Constitution of body; temperament; in old writers, the mixture or relative proportion of the four humors, blood, choler, phlegm, and melancholy.

    The exquisiteness of his [Christ's] bodily temper increased the exquisiteness of his torment. Fuller.

  6. To have or get a proper or desired state or quality; to grow soft and pliable.

    I have him already tempering between my finger and my thumb, and shortly will I seal with him. Shak.

  7. To bring to a proper degree of hardness; as, to temper iron or steel.

    The tempered metals clash, and yield a silver sound. Dryden.

  8. Disposition of mind; the constitution of the mind, particularly with regard to the passions and affections; as, a calm temper; a hasty temper; a fretful temper.

    Remember with what mild
    And gracious temper he both heared and judged.
    Milton.

    The consequents of a certain ethical temper. J. H. Newman.

  9. To govern; to manage.

    [A Latinism *** Obs.]

    With which the damned ghosts he governeth,
    And furies rules, and Tartare tempereth.
    Spenser.

  10. Calmness of mind; moderation; equanimity; composure; as, to keep one's temper.

    To fall with dignity, with temper rise. Pope.

    Restore yourselves to your tempers, fathers. B. Jonson.

  11. To moisten to a proper consistency and stir thoroughly, as clay for making brick, loam for molding, etc.
  12. Heat of mind or passion; irritation; proneness to anger; -- in a reproachful sense.

    [Colloq.]
  13. To adjust, as the mathematical scale to the actual scale, or to that in actual use.

    Syn. -- To soften] mollify; assuage; soothe; calm.

  14. The state of a metal or other substance, especially as to its hardness, produced by some process of heating or cooling; as, the temper of iron or steel.
  15. Middle state or course; mean; medium.

    [R.]

    The perfect lawgiver is a just temper between the mere man of theory, who can see nothing but general principles, and the mere man of business, who can see nothing but particular circumstances. Macaulay.

  16. Milk of lime, or other substance, employed in the process formerly used to clarify sugar.

    Temper screw, in deep well boring, an adjusting screw connecting the working beam with the rope carrying the tools, for lowering the tools as the drilling progresses.

    Syn. -- Disposition; temperament; frame; humor; mood. See Disposition.

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Temper

TEM'PER, verb transitive [Latin tempero, to mix or moderate]

1. To mix so that one part qualifies the other; to bring to a moderate state; as, to temper justice with mercy.

2. To compound; to form by mixture; to qualify, as by an ingredient; or in general, to mix, unite or combine two or more things so as to reduce the excess of the qualities of either, and bring the whole to the desired consistence or state.

Thou shalt make it a perfume, a confection after the art of the apothecary, tempered together, pure and holy. Exodus 30:35.

3. To unite in due proportion; to render symmetrical; to adjust, as parts to each other.

God hath tempered the body together. 1 Corinthians 12:24.

4. To accommodate; to modify.

Thy sustenance serving to the appetite of the eater, tempered itself to every man's liking.

5. To soften; to mollify; to assuage; to soothe; to calm; to reduce any violence or excess.

Solon--labored to temper the warlike courages of the Athenians with sweet delights of learning.

Woman! nature made thee

To temper man; we had been brutes without you.

6. To form to a proper degree of hardness; as, to temper iron or steel.

The temper'd metals clash, and yield a silver sound.

7. To govern; a Latinism. [Not in use.]

8. In music, to modify or amend a false or imperfect concord by transferring to it a part of the beauty of a perfect one, that is, by dividing the tones.

TEM'PER, noun Due mixture of different qualities; or the state of any compound substance which results from the mixture of various ingredients; as the temper of mortar.

1. Constitution of body. [In this sense we more generally use temperament.]

2. Disposition of mind; the constitution of the mind, particularly with regard to the passions and affections; as a calm temper; a hasty temper; a fretful temper This is applicable to beasts as well as to man.

Remember with what mild

And gracious temper he both heard and judg'd.

3. Calmness of mind; moderation.

Restore yourselves unto your tempers, fathers.

To fall with dignity, with temper rise.

4. Heat of mind or passion; irritation. The boy showed a great deal of temper when I reproved him.

So we say, a man of violent temper when we speak of his irritability. [This use of the word is common, though a deviation from its original and genuine meaning.]

5. The state of a metal, particularly as to its hardness; as the temper of iron or steel.

6. Middle course; mean or medium.

7. In sugar works, white lime or other substance stirred into a clarifier filled with cane-juice, to neutralize the super abundant acid.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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spheroidical

SPHEROID'AL, SPHEROID'IC, SPHEROID'ICAL, a.

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