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Sunday - December 16, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [telegraph]

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telegraph

TEL'EGRAPH, n. [Gr. at a distance, and to write.] A machine for communicating intelligence from a distance by various signals or movements previously agreed on; which signals represent letters, words or ideas which can be transmitted form one station to another, as far as the signals can be seen. This machine was invented by the French about the year 1793 or 1794, and is now adopted by other nations.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [telegraph]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

TEL'EGRAPH, n. [Gr. at a distance, and to write.] A machine for communicating intelligence from a distance by various signals or movements previously agreed on; which signals represent letters, words or ideas which can be transmitted form one station to another, as far as the signals can be seen. This machine was invented by the French about the year 1793 or 1794, and is now adopted by other nations.


TEL'E-GRAPH, n. [Gr. τηλε, at a distance, and γραφω, to write.]

A machine for communicating intelligence from a distance by various signals or movements previously agreed on; which signals represent letters, words or ideas which can be transmitted from one station to another, as far as the signals can be seen. This machine was invented by the French about the year 1793 or 1794, and is now adopted by other nations. Cyc. Electro-magnetic telegraph, an instrument or apparatus for communicating words or language to a distance by the use of electricity.


Tel"e*graph
  1. An apparatus, or a process, for communicating intelligence rapidly between distant points, especially by means of preconcerted visible or audible signals representing words or ideas, or by means of words and signs, transmitted by electrical action.

    * The instruments used are classed as indicator, type- printing, symbol-printing, or chemical-printing telegraphs, according as the intelligence is given by the movements of a pointer or indicator, as in Cooke *** Wheatstone's (the form commonly used in England), or by impressing, on a fillet of paper, letters from types, as in House's and Hughe's, or dots and marks from a sharp point moved by a magnet, as in Morse's, or symbols produced by electro-chemical action, as in Bain's. In the offices in the United States the recording instrument is now little used, the receiving operator reading by ear the combinations of long and short intervals of sound produced by the armature of an electro- magnet as it is put in motion by the opening and breaking of the circuit, which motion, in registering instruments, traces upon a ribbon of paper the lines and dots used to represent the letters of the alphabet. See Illustration in Appendix.

    Acoustic telegraph. See under Acoustic. -- Dial telegraph, a telegraph in which letters of the alphabet and numbers or other symbols are placed upon the border of a circular dial plate at each station, the apparatus being so arranged that the needle or index of the dial at the receiving station accurately copies the movements of that at the sending station. -- Electric telegraph, or Electro- magnetic telegraph, a telegraph in which an operator at one station causes words or signs to be made at another by means of a current of electricity, generated by a battery and transmitted over an intervening wire. -- Facsimile telegraph. See under Facsimile. -- Indicator telegraph. See under Indicator. -- Pan-telegraph, an electric telegraph by means of which a drawing or writing, as an autographic message, may be exactly reproduced at a distant station. - - Printing telegraph, an electric telegraph which automatically prints the message as it is received at a distant station, in letters, not signs. -- Signal telegraph, a telegraph in which preconcerted signals, made by a machine, or otherwise, at one station, are seen or heard and interpreted at another] a semaphore. -- Submarine telegraph cable, a telegraph cable laid under water to connect stations separated by a body of water. -- Telegraph cable, a telegraphic cable consisting of several conducting wires, inclosed by an insulating and protecting material, so as to bring the wires into compact compass for use on poles, or to form a strong cable impervious to water, to be laid under ground, as in a town or city, or under water, as in the ocean. -- Telegraph plant (Bot.), a leguminous plant (Desmodium gyrans) native of the East Indies. The leaflets move up and down like the signals of a semaphore.

  2. To convey or announce by telegraph.
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Telegraph

TEL'EGRAPH, noun [Gr. at a distance, and to write.] A machine for communicating intelligence from a distance by various signals or movements previously agreed on; which signals represent letters, words or ideas which can be transmitted form one station to another, as far as the signals can be seen. This machine was invented by the French about the year 1793 or 1794, and is now adopted by other nations.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

proclamation

PROCLAMA'TION, n. [L. proclamatio, from proclamo.]

1. Publication by authority; official notice given to the public.

King Asa made a proclamation throughout all Judah.

1 Kings 15.

2. In England, a declaration of the king's will, openly published.

Proclamations are a branch of the king's prerogative, and are binding on the subject.

3. The declaration of any supreme magistrate publicly made known; as the proclamation of the governor appointing a day of thanksgiving.

4. The paper containing an official notice to a people. The sheriff receives and distributes the governor's proclamations.

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