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Wednesday - December 12, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [tear]

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tear

TEAR, n.

1. Tears are the limpid fluid secreted by the lacrymal gland, and appearing in the eyes, or flowing from them. A tear, in the singular, is a drop or a small quantity of that fluid. Tears are excited by passions, particularly by grief. This fluid is also called forth by any injury done to the eye. It serves to moisten the cornea and preserve its transparency, and to remove any dust or fine substance that enters the eye and gives pain.

2. Something in the form of a transparent drop of fluid matter.

TEAR, v.t. [L. tero.]

1. To separate by violence or pulling; to rend; to lacerate; as, to tear cloth; to tear a garment, to tear the skin or flesh. We use tear and rip in different senses. To tear is to rend or separate the texture of cloth; to rip is to open a seam, to separate parts sewed together.

2. To wound; to lacerate.

The women beat their breasts, their cheeks they tear.

3. To rend; to break; to form fissures by any violence; as, torrents tear the ground.

4. To divide by violent measures; to shatter; to rend; as a state or government torn by factions.

5. To pull with violence; as, to tear the hair.

6. To remove by violence; to break up.

Or on rough seas from their foundation torn.

7. To make a violent rent.

In the midst, a tearing groan did break

The name of Antony.

To tear from, to separate and take away by force; as an isle torn from its possessor.

The hand of fate

Has torn thee from me.

To tear off, to pull off by violence; to strip.

To tear out, to pull or draw out by violence; as, to tear out the eyes.

To tear up, to rip up; to remove from a fixed state by violence; as, to tear up a floor; to tear up the foundations of government or order.

TEAR, v.i. To rave; to rage; to rant; to move and act with turbulent violence; as a mad bull.

TEAR, n. A rent; a fissure. [Little used.]




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [tear]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

TEAR, n.

1. Tears are the limpid fluid secreted by the lacrymal gland, and appearing in the eyes, or flowing from them. A tear, in the singular, is a drop or a small quantity of that fluid. Tears are excited by passions, particularly by grief. This fluid is also called forth by any injury done to the eye. It serves to moisten the cornea and preserve its transparency, and to remove any dust or fine substance that enters the eye and gives pain.

2. Something in the form of a transparent drop of fluid matter.

TEAR, v.t. [L. tero.]

1. To separate by violence or pulling; to rend; to lacerate; as, to tear cloth; to tear a garment, to tear the skin or flesh. We use tear and rip in different senses. To tear is to rend or separate the texture of cloth; to rip is to open a seam, to separate parts sewed together.

2. To wound; to lacerate.

The women beat their breasts, their cheeks they tear.

3. To rend; to break; to form fissures by any violence; as, torrents tear the ground.

4. To divide by violent measures; to shatter; to rend; as a state or government torn by factions.

5. To pull with violence; as, to tear the hair.

6. To remove by violence; to break up.

Or on rough seas from their foundation torn.

7. To make a violent rent.

In the midst, a tearing groan did break

The name of Antony.

To tear from, to separate and take away by force; as an isle torn from its possessor.

The hand of fate

Has torn thee from me.

To tear off, to pull off by violence; to strip.

To tear out, to pull or draw out by violence; as, to tear out the eyes.

To tear up, to rip up; to remove from a fixed state by violence; as, to tear up a floor; to tear up the foundations of government or order.

TEAR, v.i. To rave; to rage; to rant; to move and act with turbulent violence; as a mad bull.

TEAR, n. A rent; a fissure. [Little used.]


TEAR, n.1 [Gaelic, dear, deur; Goth. tagr, contracted in Sax. tear; G. zähre; Sw. tår; Dan. taare; W. daigyr; Gr. δακρυ; from flowing or pouring forth; Ar. تَاقَ tauka, to burst forth, as tears, or وَدَقَ wadaka, to drop or distil. See Class Dg, No. 16, 24, 48, 63.]

  1. Tears are the limpid fluid secreted by the lacrymal gland, and appearing in the eyes, or flowing from them. A tear, in the singular, is a drop or a small quantity of that fluid. Tears are excited by passions, particularly by grief. This fluid is also called forth by any injury done to the eye. It serves to moisten the cornea and preserve its transparency, and to remove any dust or fine substance that enters the eye and gives pain.
  2. Something in the form of a transparent drop of fluid matter.

TEAR, n.2

A rent; a fissure. [Little used.]


TEAR, v.i.

To rave; to rage; to rant; to move and act with turbulent violence; as a mad bull. L'Estrange.


TEAR, v.t. [pret. tore; pp. torn; old pret. tare, obs. Sax. tæran, to tear; tiran, tyran, tyrian, tyrigan, to fret, gnaw, provoke; Russ. deru, to tear. In Sw. tära is to fret, consume, waste; Dan. tærer, id.; D. teeren, G. zehren, id. These are probably the same word varied in signification, and they coincide with L. tero, Gr. τειρω. In W. tori, Arm. torri, Corn. terhi, is to break; and Syr. תרע, to tear, to rend. Class Dr, No. 42, 51.]

  1. To separate by violence or pulling; to rend; to lacerate; as, to tear cloth; to tear a garment; to tear the skin or flesh. We use tear and rip in different senses. To tear is to rend or separate the texture of cloth; to rip is to open a seam, to separate parts sewed together.
  2. To wound; to lacerate. The women beat their breasts, their cheeks they tear. Shak.
  3. To rend; to break; to form fissures by any violence; as, torrents tear the ground. Dryden.
  4. To divide by violent measures; to shatter; to rend; as, a state or government torn by factions. Locke.
  5. To pull with violence; as, to tear the hair. Dryden.
  6. To remove by violence; to break up. Or on rough seas from their foundation torn. Dryden.
  7. To make a violent rent. In the midst, a tearing groan did break / The name of Antony. Shak. To tear from, to separate and take away by force; as, an isle torn from its possessor. The hand of fate / Has torn thee from me. Addison. To tear off, to pull off by violence; to strip. To tear out, to pull or draw out by violence; as, to tear out the eyes. To tear up, to rip up; to remove from a fixed state by violence; as, to tear up a floor; to tear up the foundations of government or order.

Tear
  1. A drop of the limpid, saline fluid secreted, normally in small amount, by the lachrymal gland, and diffused between the eye and the eyelids to moisten the parts and facilitate their motion. Ordinarily the secretion passes through the lachrymal duct into the nose, but when it is increased by emotion or other causes, it overflows the lids.

    And yet for thee ne wept she never a tear. Chaucer.

  2. To separate by violence; to pull apart by force; to rend; to lacerate; as, to tear cloth; to tear a garment; to tear the skin or flesh.

    Tear him to pieces; he's a conspirator. Shak.

  3. To divide or separate on being pulled; to be rent; as, this cloth tears easily.
  4. The act of tearing, or the state of being torn; a rent; a fissure.

    Macaulay.

    Wear and tear. See under Wear, n.

  5. A partially vitrified bit of clay in glass.

    -- Tears of St. Lawrence, the Perseid shower of meteors, seen every year on or about the eve of St. Lawrence, August 9th. -- T. of wine, drops which form and roll down a glass above the surface of strong wine. The phenomenon is due to the evaporation of alcohol from the surface layer, which, becoming more watery, increases in surface tension and creeps up the sides until its weight causes it to break.
  6. Something in the form of a transparent drop of fluid matter; also, a solid, transparent, tear-shaped drop, as of some balsams or resins.

    Let Araby extol her happy coast,
    Her fragrant flowers, her trees with precious tears.
    Dryden.

  7. Hence, to divide by violent measures; to disrupt; to rend; as, a party or government torn by factions.
  8. To move and act with turbulent violence; to rush with violence; hence, to rage; to rave.
  9. That which causes or accompanies tears; a lament; a dirge.

    [R.] "Some melodous tear." Milton.

    * Tear is sometimes used in the formation of self-explaining compounds; as, tear-distilling, tear-drop, tear- filled, tear-stained, and the like.

  10. To rend away; to force away; to remove by force; to sunder; as, a child torn from its home.

    The hand of fate
    Hath torn thee from me.
    Addison.

  11. To pull with violence; as, to tear the hair.
  12. To move violently; to agitate.

    "Once I loved torn ocean's roar." Byron.

    To tear a cat, to rant violently; to rave; -- especially applied to theatrical ranting. [Obs.] Shak. -- To tear down, to demolish violently; to pull or pluck down. -- To tear off, to pull off by violence; to strip. -- To tear out, to pull or draw out by violence; as, to tear out the eyes. -- To tear up, to rip up; to remove from a fixed state by violence; as, to tear up a floor; to tear up the foundation of government or order.

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Tear

TEAR, noun

1. Tears are the limpid fluid secreted by the lacrymal gland, and appearing in the eyes, or flowing from them. A tear in the singular, is a drop or a small quantity of that fluid. Tears are excited by passions, particularly by grief. This fluid is also called forth by any injury done to the eye. It serves to moisten the cornea and preserve its transparency, and to remove any dust or fine substance that enters the eye and gives pain.

2. Something in the form of a transparent drop of fluid matter.

TEAR, verb transitive [Latin tero.]

1. To separate by violence or pulling; to rend; to lacerate; as, to tear cloth; to tear a garment, to tear the skin or flesh. We use tear and rip in different senses. To tear is to rend or separate the texture of cloth; to rip is to open a seam, to separate parts sewed together.

2. To wound; to lacerate.

The women beat their breasts, their cheeks they tear

3. To rend; to break; to form fissures by any violence; as, torrents tear the ground.

4. To divide by violent measures; to shatter; to rend; as a state or government torn by factions.

5. To pull with violence; as, to tear the hair.

6. To remove by violence; to break up.

Or on rough seas from their foundation torn.

7. To make a violent rent.

In the midst, a tearing groan did break

The name of Antony.

To tear from, to separate and take away by force; as an isle torn from its possessor.

The hand of fate

Has torn thee from me.

To tear off, to pull off by violence; to strip.

To tear out, to pull or draw out by violence; as, to tear out the eyes.

To tear up, to rip up; to remove from a fixed state by violence; as, to tear up a floor; to tear up the foundations of government or order.

TEAR, verb intransitive To rave; to rage; to rant; to move and act with turbulent violence; as a mad bull.

TEAR, noun A rent; a fissure. [Little used.]

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importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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