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Tuesday - December 18, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [tail]

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tail

TAIL, n.

1. The part of an animal which terminates its body behind. In many quadrupeds, the tail is a shoot or projection covered with hair. In fowls, the tail consists of feathers, or is covered with them, which serve to assist in the direction of their flight. In fishes the tail is formed usually by a gradual sloping of the body, ending in a fin. The tail of a fish may assist the animal in steering, but its principal use is to propel the fish forward. It is the instrument of swimming.

2. The lower part,noting inferiority.

The Lord will make thee the head, and not the tail. Deut.28.

3. Any thing hanging long; a catkin.

4. The hinder part of any thing.

5. In anatomy, that tendon of a muscle which is fixed to the movable part.

6. In botany, the tail of a seed, is a downy or feathery appendage to certain seeds, formed of the permanent elongated style.

7. Horse's tail, among the Tartars and Chinese, is an ensign or flag; among the Turks, a standard borne before the grand visier, bashaws and the sangiacs. For this purpose, it is fitted to a half-pike with a gold button, and is called toug. There are bashaws of one, two and three tails.

8. In heraldry, the tail of a hart.

9. In music, the part of a note running upwards or downwards.

10. The extremity or last end; as the tail of a storm.

Tail of a comet, a luminous train which extends from the nucleus in a direction opposite to the sun.

To turn tail, is to run away; to flee.

Tail of a lock, on a canal, the lower end, or entrance into the lower pond.

Tail-piece, of a violin, is a piece of ebony attached to the end of the instrument, to which the strings are fastened.

TAIL, n. In law, an estate in tail is a limited fee; an estate limited to certain heirs, and from which the other heirs are precluded. Estates tail are general or special; general, where lands and tenements are given to one, and to the heirs of his body begotten; special, where the gift is restrained to certain heirs of the donee;s body, as to his heirs by a particular woman names. See Entail.]

TAIL, v.t. To pull by the tail.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [tail]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

TAIL, n.

1. The part of an animal which terminates its body behind. In many quadrupeds, the tail is a shoot or projection covered with hair. In fowls, the tail consists of feathers, or is covered with them, which serve to assist in the direction of their flight. In fishes the tail is formed usually by a gradual sloping of the body, ending in a fin. The tail of a fish may assist the animal in steering, but its principal use is to propel the fish forward. It is the instrument of swimming.

2. The lower part,noting inferiority.

The Lord will make thee the head, and not the tail. Deut.28.

3. Any thing hanging long; a catkin.

4. The hinder part of any thing.

5. In anatomy, that tendon of a muscle which is fixed to the movable part.

6. In botany, the tail of a seed, is a downy or feathery appendage to certain seeds, formed of the permanent elongated style.

7. Horse's tail, among the Tartars and Chinese, is an ensign or flag; among the Turks, a standard borne before the grand visier, bashaws and the sangiacs. For this purpose, it is fitted to a half-pike with a gold button, and is called toug. There are bashaws of one, two and three tails.

8. In heraldry, the tail of a hart.

9. In music, the part of a note running upwards or downwards.

10. The extremity or last end; as the tail of a storm.

Tail of a comet, a luminous train which extends from the nucleus in a direction opposite to the sun.

To turn tail, is to run away; to flee.

Tail of a lock, on a canal, the lower end, or entrance into the lower pond.

Tail-piece, of a violin, is a piece of ebony attached to the end of the instrument, to which the strings are fastened.

TAIL, n. In law, an estate in tail is a limited fee; an estate limited to certain heirs, and from which the other heirs are precluded. Estates tail are general or special; general, where lands and tenements are given to one, and to the heirs of his body begotten; special, where the gift is restrained to certain heirs of the donee;s body, as to his heirs by a particular woman names. See Entail.]

TAIL, v.t. To pull by the tail.


TAIL, n.1 [Sax. tægl; Ice. tagl; dim. of tag, a shoot, or from Goth. taga, hair.]

  1. The part of an animal which terminates its body behind. In many quadrupeds, the tail is a shoot or projection covered with hair. In fowls, the tail consists of feathers, or is covered with them, which serve to assist in the direction of their flight. In fishes the tail is formed usually by a gradual sloping of the body, ending in a fin. The tail of a fish may assist the animal in steering, but its principal use is to propel the fish forward. It is the instrument of swimming.
  2. The lower part, noting inferiority. The Lord will make thee the head, and not the tail. Deut. xxviii.
  3. Any thing hanging long; a catkin. Harvey.
  4. The hinder part of any thing. Butler.
  5. In anatomy, that tendon of a muscle which is fixed to the movable part. Cyc.
  6. In botany, the tail of a seed, is a downy or feathery appendage to certain seeds, formed of the permanent elongated style. Cyc.
  7. Horse's tail, among the Tartars and Chinese, is an ensign or flag; among the Turks, a standard borne before the grand visier, bashaws and the sangiacs. For this purpose, it is fitted to a half-pike with a gold button, and is called toug. There are bashaws of one, two and three tails. Cyc.
  8. In heraldry, the tail of a hart.
  9. In music, the part of a note running upward or downward.
  10. The extremity or last end; as, the tail of a storm. Tail of a comet, a luminous train which extends from the nucleus in a direction opposite to the sun. To turn tail, is to run away; to flee. Tail of a lock, on a canal, the lower end, or entrance into the lower pond.

TAIL, n.2 [Fr. tailler, Sp. tallar, It. tagliare, Port. talhar, Ir. tallam, to cut off; W. toli, to curtail, to separate, to deal out, from tawl, a sending or throwing, a cast or throw, a separation, diminution, interruption. This is from the same root as deal. Class Dl, No. 15. See Deal.]

In law, an estate in tail is a limited fee; an estate limited to certain heirs, and from which the other heirs are precluded. Estates tail are general or special; general, where lands and tenements are given to one, and to the heirs of his body begotten; special, where the gift is restrained to certain heirs of the donee's body, as to his heirs by a particular woman named. [See Entail.] Blackstone.


TAIL, v.t.

To pull by the tail. Hudibras.


Tail
  1. Limitation; abridgment.

    Burrill.

    Estate in tail, a limited, abridged, or reduced fee; an estate limited to certain heirs, and from which the other heirs are precluded; -- called also estate tail. Blackstone.

  2. Limited; abridged; reduced; curtailed; as, estate tail.
  3. The terminal, and usually flexible, posterior appendage of an animal.

    * The tail of mammals and reptiles contains a series of movable vertebræ, and is covered with flesh and hairs or scales like those of other parts of the body. The tail of existing birds consists of several more or less consolidated vertebræ which supports a fanlike group of quills to which the term tail is more particularly applied. The tail of fishes consists of the tapering hind portion of the body ending in a caudal fin. The term tail is sometimes applied to the entire abdomen of a crustacean or insect, and sometimes to the terminal piece or pygidium alone.

  4. To follow or hang to, like a tail; to be attached closely to, as that which can not be evaded.

    [Obs.]

    Nevertheless his bond of two thousand pounds, wherewith he was tailed, continued uncanceled, and was called on the next Parliament. Fuller.

  5. To hold by the end; -- said of a timber when it rests upon a wall or other support; -- with in or into.
  6. In some forms of rope-laying machine, pieces of rope attached to the iron bar passing through the grooven wooden top containing the strands, for wrapping around the rope to be laid.
  7. In flying machines, a plane or group of planes used at the rear to confer stability.
  8. Any long, flexible terminal appendage; whatever resembles, in shape or position, the tail of an animal, as a catkin.

    Doretus writes a great praise of the distilled waters of those tails that hang on willow trees. Harvey.

  9. To pull or draw by the tail.

    [R.] Hudibras.

    To tail in or on (Arch.), to fasten by one of the ends into a wall or some other support; as, to tail in a timber.

  10. To swing with the stern in a certain direction; -- said of a vessel at anchor; as, this vessel tails down stream.

    Tail on. (Naut.) See Tally on, under Tally.

  11. A tailed coat; a tail coat.

    [Colloq. or Dial.]
  12. Hence, the back, last, lower, or inferior part of anything, -- as opposed to the head, or the superior part.

    The Lord will make thee the head, and not the tail. Deut. xxviii. 13.

  13. A train or company of attendants; a retinue.

    "Ah," said he, "if you saw but the chief with his tail on." Sir W. Scott.

  14. The side of a coin opposite to that which bears the head, effigy, or date; the reverse; -- rarely used except in the expression "heads or tails," employed when a coin is thrown up for the purpose of deciding some point by its fall.
  15. The distal tendon of a muscle.
  16. A downy or feathery appendage to certain achenes. It is formed of the permanent elongated style.
  17. A portion of an incision, at its beginning or end, which does not go through the whole thickness of the skin, and is more painful than a complete incision; -- called also tailing.

    (b)
  18. A rope spliced to the strap of a block, by which it may be lashed to anything.
  19. The part of a note which runs perpendicularly upward or downward from the head; the stem.

    Moore (Encyc. of Music).
  20. Same as Tailing, 4.
  21. The bottom or lower portion of a member or part, as a slate or tile.
  22. See Tailing, n., 5.

    Tail beam. (Arch.) Same as Tailpiece. -- Tail coverts (Zoöl.), the feathers which cover the bases of the tail quills. They are sometimes much longer than the quills, and form elegant plumes. Those above the quills are called the upper tail coverts, and those below, the under tail coverts. -- Tail end, the latter end; the termination; as, the tail end of a contest. [Colloq.] -- Tail joist. (Arch.) Same as Tailpiece. -- Tail of a comet (Astron.), a luminous train extending from the nucleus or body, often to a great distance, and usually in a direction opposite to the sun. -- Tail of a gale (Naut.), the latter part of it, when the wind has greatly abated. Totten. -- Tail of a lock (on a canal), the lower end, or entrance into the lower pond. -- Tail of the trenches (Fort.), the post where the besiegers begin to break ground, and cover themselves from the fire of the place, in advancing the lines of approach. -- Tail spindle, the spindle of the tailstock of a turning lathe; -- called also dead spindle. -- To turn tail, to run away; to flee.

    Would she turn tail to the heron, and fly quite out another way; but all was to return in a higher pitch. Sir P. Sidney.

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Tail

TAIL, noun

1. The part of an animal which terminates its body behind. In many quadrupeds, the tail is a shoot or projection covered with hair. In fowls, the tail consists of feathers, or is covered with them, which serve to assist in the direction of their flight. In fishes the tail is formed usually by a gradual sloping of the body, ending in a fin. The tail of a fish may assist the animal in steering, but its principal use is to propel the fish forward. It is the instrument of swimming.

2. The lower part, noting inferiority.

The Lord will make thee the head, and not the tail Deuteronomy 28:13.

3. Any thing hanging long; a catkin.

4. The hinder part of any thing.

5. In anatomy, that tendon of a muscle which is fixed to the movable part.

6. In botany, the tail of a seed, is a downy or feathery appendage to certain seeds, formed of the permanent elongated style.

7. Horse's tail among the Tartars and Chinese, is an ensign or flag; among the Turks, a standard borne before the grand visier, bashaws and the sangiacs. For this purpose, it is fitted to a half-pike with a gold button, and is called toug. There are bashaws of one, two and three tails.

8. In heraldry, the tail of a hart.

9. In music, the part of a note running upwards or downwards.

10. The extremity or last end; as the tail of a storm.

TAIL of a comet, a luminous train which extends from the nucleus in a direction opposite to the sun.

To turn tail is to run away; to flee.

TAIL of a lock, on a canal, the lower end, or entrance into the lower pond.

TAIL-piece, of a violin, is a piece of ebony attached to the end of the instrument, to which the strings are fastened.

TAIL, noun In law, an estate in tail is a limited fee; an estate limited to certain heirs, and from which the other heirs are precluded. Estates tail are general or special; general, where lands and tenements are given to one, and to the heirs of his body begotten; special, where the gift is restrained to certain heirs of the donee; s body, as to his heirs by a particular woman names. See Entail.]

TAIL, verb transitive To pull by the tail

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truth

— Tg (Saint Louis, MO)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

den

DEN, n.

1. A cave or hollow place in the earth; usually applied to a cave, pit, or subterraneous recess, used for concealment, shelter, protection or security; as a lions den; a den of robbers or thieves.

The beasts go into dens. The children of Israel made themselves dens. Job 37. Judges 6.

2. As a termination, in names of places, it denotes the place to be in a valley or near a wood.

DEN, v.i. To dwell as in a den.

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