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Wednesday - December 11, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [swamp]

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swamp

SWAMP, n. Spungy land; low ground filled with water; soft wet ground. In New England, I believe this word is never applied to marsh, or the boggy land made by the overflowing of salt water, but always to low soft ground in the interior country; wet and spungy land, but not usually covered with water. This is the true meaning of the word. Swamps are often mowed. In England, the word is explained in books by boggy land, morassy or marshy ground.

SWAMP, v.t. To plunge, whelm or sink in a swamp; to plunge into difficulties inextricable.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [swamp]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SWAMP, n. Spungy land; low ground filled with water; soft wet ground. In New England, I believe this word is never applied to marsh, or the boggy land made by the overflowing of salt water, but always to low soft ground in the interior country; wet and spungy land, but not usually covered with water. This is the true meaning of the word. Swamps are often mowed. In England, the word is explained in books by boggy land, morassy or marshy ground.

SWAMP, v.t. To plunge, whelm or sink in a swamp; to plunge into difficulties inextricable.


SWAMP, n. [Sax. swam, a fungus or mushroom; Goth. swamms, a spunge, G. schwamm, D. zwam, Dan. svamp; Sw. id. a spunge, a fungus.]

Spungy land; low ground filled with water; soft wet ground. In New England, I believe this word is never applied to marsh, or the boggy land made by the overflowing of salt water, but always to low soft ground in the interior country; wet and spongy land, but not usually covered with water. This is the true meaning of the word. Swamp are often mowed. In England, the word is explained in books by boggy land, morassy or marshy ground.


SWAMP, v.t.

  1. To plunge, overact or sink and be lost in water.
  2. To plunge into inextricable difficulties.

Swamp
  1. Wet, spongy land] soft, low ground saturated with water, but not usually covered with it; marshy ground away from the seashore.

    Gray swamps and pools, waste places of the hern. Tennyson.

    A swamp differs from a bog and a marsh in producing trees and shrubs, while the latter produce only herbage, plants, and mosses. Farming Encyc. (E. Edwards, Words).

    Swamp blackbird. (Zoöl.) See Redwing (b). -- Swamp cabbage (Bot.), skunk cabbage. -- Swamp deer (Zoöl.), an Asiatic deer (Rucervus Duvaucelli) of India. -- Swamp hen. (Zoöl.) (a) An Australian azure-breasted bird (Porphyrio bellus); -- called also goollema. (b) An Australian water crake, or rail (Porzana Tabuensis); -- called also little swamp hen. (c) The European purple gallinule. -- Swamp honeysuckle (Bot.), an American shrub (Azalea, or Rhododendron, viscosa) growing in swampy places, with fragrant flowers of a white color, or white tinged with rose; -- called also swamp pink. -- Swamp hook, a hook and chain used by lumbermen in handling logs. Cf. Cant hook. -- Swamp itch. (Med.) See Prairie itch, under Prairie. -- Swamp laurel (Bot.), a shrub (Kalmia glauca) having small leaves with the lower surface glaucous. -- Swamp maple (Bot.), red maple. See Maple. -- Swamp oak (Bot.), a name given to several kinds of oak which grow in swampy places, as swamp Spanish oak (Quercus palustris), swamp white oak (Q. bicolor), swamp post oak (Q. lyrata). -- Swamp ore (Min.), bog ore; limonite. -- Swamp partridge (Zoöl.), any one of several Australian game birds of the genera Synoicus and Excalfatoria, allied to the European partridges. -- Swamp robin (Zoöl.), the chewink. -- Swamp sassafras (Bot.), a small North American tree of the genus Magnolia (M. glauca) with aromatic leaves and fragrant creamy-white blossoms; -- called also sweet bay. -- Swamp sparrow (Zoöl.), a common North American sparrow (Melospiza Georgiana, or M. palustris), closely resembling the song sparrow. It lives in low, swampy places. -- Swamp willow. (Bot.) See Pussy willow, under Pussy.

  2. To plunge or sink into a swamp.
  3. To sink or stick in a swamp; figuratively, to become involved in insuperable difficulties.
  4. To cause (a boat) to become filled with water] to capsize or sink by whelming with water.
  5. To become filled with water, as a boat; to founder; to capsize or sink; figuratively, to be ruined; to be wrecked.
  6. Fig.: To plunge into difficulties and perils; to overwhelm; to ruin; to wreck.

    The Whig majority of the house of Lords was swamped by the creation of twelve Tory peers. J. R. Green.

    Having swamped himself in following the ignis fatuus of a theory. Sir W. Hamilton.

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Swamp

SWAMP, noun Spungy land; low ground filled with water; soft wet ground. In New England, I believe this word is never applied to marsh, or the boggy land made by the overflowing of salt water, but always to low soft ground in the interior country; wet and spungy land, but not usually covered with water. This is the true meaning of the word. Swamps are often mowed. In England, the word is explained in books by boggy land, morassy or marshy ground.

SWAMP, verb transitive To plunge, whelm or sink in a swamp; to plunge into difficulties inextricable.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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bucephalus

BUCEPH'ALUS, n. An animal of the gazelle tribe, of the size of a hind.

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