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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [sun]

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sun

SUN, n.

1. The splendid orb or luminary which, being in or near the center of our system of worlds, gives light and heat to all the planets. The light of the sun constitutes the day, and the darkness which proceeds form its absence, or the shade of the earth, constitutes the night. Ps.136.

2. In popular usage, a sunny place; a place where the beams of the sun fall; as, to stand in the sun, that is, to stand where the direct rays of the sun fall.

3. Any thing eminently splendid or luminous; that which is the chief source of light or honor. The natives of America complain that the sun of their glory is set.

I will never consent to put out the sun of sovereignty to posterity.

4. In Scripture, Christ is called the sun of righteousness, as the source of light, animation and comfort to his disciples.

5. The luminary or orb which constitutes the center of any system of worlds. The fixed stars are supposed to be suns in their respective systems.

Under the sun, in the world; on earth; a proverbial expression.

There is no new thing under the sun. Eccles.1.

SUN, v.t. To expose to the sun's rays; to warm or dry in the light of the sun; to insolate; as, to sun cloth; to sun grain.

--Then to sun thyself in open air.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [sun]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SUN, n.

1. The splendid orb or luminary which, being in or near the center of our system of worlds, gives light and heat to all the planets. The light of the sun constitutes the day, and the darkness which proceeds form its absence, or the shade of the earth, constitutes the night. Ps.136.

2. In popular usage, a sunny place; a place where the beams of the sun fall; as, to stand in the sun, that is, to stand where the direct rays of the sun fall.

3. Any thing eminently splendid or luminous; that which is the chief source of light or honor. The natives of America complain that the sun of their glory is set.

I will never consent to put out the sun of sovereignty to posterity.

4. In Scripture, Christ is called the sun of righteousness, as the source of light, animation and comfort to his disciples.

5. The luminary or orb which constitutes the center of any system of worlds. The fixed stars are supposed to be suns in their respective systems.

Under the sun, in the world; on earth; a proverbial expression.

There is no new thing under the sun. Eccles.1.

SUN, v.t. To expose to the sun's rays; to warm or dry in the light of the sun; to insolate; as, to sun cloth; to sun grain.

--Then to sun thyself in open air.

SUN, n. [Sax. sunna; Goth. sunno; G. sonne; D. zon; Sans. sunuh. The Danish has Söndag, Sunday, Slav. Sonze. Qu. W. tan, Ir. teine, fire, and shan, in Bethshan.]

  1. The splendid orb or luminary which, being in or near the center of our system of worlds, gives light and heat to all the planets. The light of the sun constitutes the day, and the darkness which proceeds from its absence, or the shade of the earth, constitutes the night. – Ps. cxxxvi.
  2. In popular usage, a sunny place; a place where the beams of the sun fall; as, to stand in the sun, that is, to stand where the direct rays of the sun fall.
  3. Any thing eminently splendid or luminous; that which is the chief source of light or honor. The native Indians of America complain that the sun of their glory is set. I will never consent to put out the sun of sovereignty to posterity. – K. Charles.
  4. In Scripture, Christ is called the sun of righteousness, as the source of light, animation and comfort to his disciples.
  5. The luminary or orb which constitutes the center of any system of worlds. The fixed stars are supposed to be suns in their respective systems. Under the sun, in the world; on earth; a proverbial expression. There is no new thing under the sun. – Eccles. i.

SUN, v.t.

To expose to the sun's rays; to warm or dry in the light of the sun; to insolate; as, to sun cloth; to sun grain. Then to sun thyself in open air. – Dryden.


Sun
  1. See Sunn.
  2. The luminous orb, the light of which constitutes day, and its absence night; the central body round which the earth and planets revolve, by which they are held in their orbits, and from which they receive light and heat. Its mean distance from the earth is about 92,500,000 miles, and its diameter about 860,000.

    * Its mean apparent diameter as seen from the earth is 32***prime] 4***Prime], and it revolves on its own axis once in 25***frac13] days. Its mean density is about one fourth of that of the earth, or 1.41, that of water being unity. Its luminous surface is called the photosphere, above which is an envelope consisting partly of hydrogen, called the chromosphere, which can be seen only through the spectroscope, or at the time of a total solar eclipse. Above the chromosphere, and sometimes extending out millions of miles, are luminous rays or streams of light which are visible only at the time of a total eclipse, forming the solar corona.

  3. To expose to the sun's rays] to warm or dry in the sun; as, to sun cloth; to sun grain.

    Then to sun thyself in open air. Dryden.

  4. Any heavenly body which forms the center of a system of orbs.
  5. The direct light or warmth of the sun; sunshine.

    Lambs that did frisk in the sun. Shak.

  6. That which resembles the sun, as in splendor or importance; any source of light, warmth, or animation.

    For the Lord God is a sun and shield. Ps. lxxiv. 11.

    I will never consent to put out the sun of sovereignity to posterity. Eikon Basilike.

    Sun and planet wheels (Mach.), an ingenious contrivance for converting reciprocating motion, as that of the working beam of a steam engine, into rotatory motion. It consists of a toothed wheel (called the sun wheel), firmly secured to the shaft it is desired to drive, and another wheel (called the planet wheel) secured to the end of a connecting rod. By the motion of the connecting rod, the planet wheel is made to circulate round the central wheel on the shaft, communicating to this latter a velocity of revolution the double of its own. G. Francis. -- Sun angel (Zoöl.), a South American humming bird of the genus Heliangelos, noted for its beautiful colors and the brilliant luster of the feathers of its throat. -- Sun animalcute. (Zoöl.) See Heliozoa. -- Sun bath (Med.), exposure of a patient to the sun's rays; insolation. -- Sun bear (Zoöl.), a species of bear (Helarctos Malayanus) native of Southern Asia and Borneo. It has a small head and short neck, and fine short glossy fur, mostly black, but brownish on the nose. It is easily tamed. Called also bruang, and Malayan bear. -- Sun beetle (Zoöl.), any small lustrous beetle of the genus Amara. -- Sun bittern (Zoöl.), a singular South American bird (Eurypyga helias), in some respects related both to the rails and herons. It is beautifully variegated with white, brown, and black. Called also sunbird, and tiger bittern. -- Sun fever (Med.), the condition of fever produced by sun stroke. -- Sun gem (Zoöl.), a Brazilian humming bird (Heliactin cornutus). Its head is ornamented by two tufts of bright colored feathers, fiery crimson at the base and greenish yellow at the tip. Called also Horned hummer. -- Sun grebe (Zoöl.), the finfoot. -- Sun picture, a picture taken by the agency of the sun's rays; a photograph. -- Sun spots (Astron.), dark spots that appear on the sun's disk, consisting commonly of a black central portion with a surrounding border of lighter shade, and usually seen only by the telescope, but sometimes by the naked eye. They are very changeable in their figure and dimensions, and vary in size from mere apparent points to spaces of 50,000 miles in diameter. The term sun spots is often used to include bright spaces (called faculæ) as well as dark spaces (called maculæ). Called also solar spots. See Illustration in Appendix. -- Sun star (Zoöl.), any one of several species of starfishes belonging to Solaster, Crossaster, and allied genera, having numerous rays. -- Sun trout (Zoöl.), the squeteague. -- Sun wheel. (Mach.) See Sun and planet wheels, above. -- Under the sun, in the world; on earth. "There is no new thing under the sun." Eccl. i. 9.

    * Sun is often used in the formation of compound adjectives of obvious meaning; as, sun-bright, sun- dried, sun-gilt, sunlike, sun-lit, sun- scorched, and the like.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Sun

SUN, noun

1. The splendid orb or luminary which, being in or near the center of our system of worlds, gives light and heat to all the planets. The light of the sun constitutes the day, and the darkness which proceeds form its absence, or the shade of the earth, constitutes the night. Psalms 136:8.

2. In popular usage, a sunny place; a place where the beams of the sun fall; as, to stand in the sun that is, to stand where the direct rays of the sun fall.

3. Any thing eminently splendid or luminous; that which is the chief source of light or honor. The natives of America complain that the sun of their glory is set.

I will never consent to put out the sun of sovereignty to posterity.

4. In Scripture, Christ is called the sun of righteousness, as the source of light, animation and comfort to his disciples.

5. The luminary or orb which constitutes the center of any system of worlds. The fixed stars are supposed to be suns in their respective systems.

Under the sun in the world; on earth; a proverbial expression.

There is no new thing under the sun Ecclesiastes 1:3.

SUN, verb transitive To expose to the sun's rays; to warm or dry in the light of the sun; to insolate; as, to sun cloth; to sun grain.

--Then to sun thyself in open air.

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For Bible Study

— David (York, PA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

immingle

IMMIN'GLE, v.t. [in and mingle.] To mingle; to mix; to unite with numbers.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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