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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [strength]

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strength

STRENGTH, n. [See Strong.]

1. That property or quality of an animal body by which it is enabled to move itself or other bodies. We say, a sick man has not strength to walk, or to raise his head or his arm. We say, a man has strength to lift a weight, or to draw it. This quality is called also power and force. But force is also used to denote the effect of strength exerted, or the quantity of motion. Strength in this sense, is positive, or the power of producing positive motion or action, and is opposed to weakness.

2. Firmness; solidity or toughness; the quality of bodies by which they sustain the application of force without breaking or yielding. Thus we speak of the strength of a bone, the strength of a beam, the strength of a wall, the strength of a rope. In this sense, strength is a passive quality, and is opposed to weakness or frangibility.

3. Power or vigor of any kind.

This act shall crush the strength of Satan.

Strength there must be either of love or war.

4. Power of resisting attacks; fastness; as the strength of a castle or fort.

5. Support; that which supports; that which supplies strength; security.

God is our refuge and strength. Psalm 46.

6. Power of mind; intellectual force; the power of any faculty; as strength of memory; strength of reason; strength of judgment.

7. Spirit; animation.

Me thinks I feel new strength within me rise.

8. Force of writing; vigor; nervous diction. The strength of words, of style, of expression and the like, consists in the full and forcible exhibition of ideas, by which a sensible or deep impression is made on the mind of a hearer or reader. It is distinguished from softness or sweetness. Strength of language enforces an argument, produces conviction, or excites wonder or other strong emotion; softness and sweetness give pleasure.

And praise the easy vigor of a line, where Denhams strength and Wellers sweetness join.

9. Vividness; as strength of colors or coloring.

10. Spirit; the quality of any liquor which has the power of affecting the taste, or of producing sensible effects on other bodies; as the strength of wine or spirit; the strength of an acid.

11. The virtue or spirit of any vegetable, or of its juices or qualities.

12. Legal or moral force; validity; the quality of binding, uniting or securing; as the strength of social or legal obligations; the strength of law; the strength of public opinion or custom.

13. Vigor; natural force; as the strength of natural affection.

14. That which supports; confidence.

The allies, after a successful summer, are too apt upon the strength of it to neglect preparation for the ensuing campaign.

15. Amount of force, military or naval; an army or navy; number of troops or ships well appointed. What is the strength of the enemy by land, or by sea?

16. Soundness; force; the quality that convinces, persuades or commands assent; as the strength of an argument or of reasoning; the strength of evidence.

17. Vehemence; force proceeding from motion and proportioned to it; as the strength of wind or a current of water.

18. Degree of brightness or vividness; as the strength of light.

19. Fortification; fortress; as an inaccessible strength. [Not in use.]

20. Support; maintenance of power.

What they boded would be a mischief to us, you are providing shall be one of our principal strengths. [Not used.]

STRENGTH, v.t To strengthen. [Not in use.]




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [strength]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

STRENGTH, n. [See Strong.]

1. That property or quality of an animal body by which it is enabled to move itself or other bodies. We say, a sick man has not strength to walk, or to raise his head or his arm. We say, a man has strength to lift a weight, or to draw it. This quality is called also power and force. But force is also used to denote the effect of strength exerted, or the quantity of motion. Strength in this sense, is positive, or the power of producing positive motion or action, and is opposed to weakness.

2. Firmness; solidity or toughness; the quality of bodies by which they sustain the application of force without breaking or yielding. Thus we speak of the strength of a bone, the strength of a beam, the strength of a wall, the strength of a rope. In this sense, strength is a passive quality, and is opposed to weakness or frangibility.

3. Power or vigor of any kind.

This act shall crush the strength of Satan.

Strength there must be either of love or war.

4. Power of resisting attacks; fastness; as the strength of a castle or fort.

5. Support; that which supports; that which supplies strength; security.

God is our refuge and strength. Psalm 46.

6. Power of mind; intellectual force; the power of any faculty; as strength of memory; strength of reason; strength of judgment.

7. Spirit; animation.

Me thinks I feel new strength within me rise.

8. Force of writing; vigor; nervous diction. The strength of words, of style, of expression and the like, consists in the full and forcible exhibition of ideas, by which a sensible or deep impression is made on the mind of a hearer or reader. It is distinguished from softness or sweetness. Strength of language enforces an argument, produces conviction, or excites wonder or other strong emotion; softness and sweetness give pleasure.

And praise the easy vigor of a line, where Denhams strength and Wellers sweetness join.

9. Vividness; as strength of colors or coloring.

10. Spirit; the quality of any liquor which has the power of affecting the taste, or of producing sensible effects on other bodies; as the strength of wine or spirit; the strength of an acid.

11. The virtue or spirit of any vegetable, or of its juices or qualities.

12. Legal or moral force; validity; the quality of binding, uniting or securing; as the strength of social or legal obligations; the strength of law; the strength of public opinion or custom.

13. Vigor; natural force; as the strength of natural affection.

14. That which supports; confidence.

The allies, after a successful summer, are too apt upon the strength of it to neglect preparation for the ensuing campaign.

15. Amount of force, military or naval; an army or navy; number of troops or ships well appointed. What is the strength of the enemy by land, or by sea?

16. Soundness; force; the quality that convinces, persuades or commands assent; as the strength of an argument or of reasoning; the strength of evidence.

17. Vehemence; force proceeding from motion and proportioned to it; as the strength of wind or a current of water.

18. Degree of brightness or vividness; as the strength of light.

19. Fortification; fortress; as an inaccessible strength. [Not in use.]

20. Support; maintenance of power.

What they boded would be a mischief to us, you are providing shall be one of our principal strengths. [Not used.]

STRENGTH, v.t To strengthen. [Not in use.]


STRENGTH, n. [Sax. strength, from streng, strong. See Strong.]

  1. That property or quality of an animal body by which is enabled to move itself or other bodies. We say, a sick man has not strength to walk, or to raise his head or his arm. We say, a man has strength to lift a weight, or to draw it. This quality is called also power and force. Bu force is also used to denote the effect of strength exerted, or the quantity of motion. Strength in this sense, is positive, or the power of producing positive motion or action, and is opposed to weakness.
  2. Firmness; solidity or toughness; the quality of bodies by which they sustain the application of force without breaking or yielding. Thus we speak of the strength of bone, the strength of a beam, the strength of a wall, the strength of a rope. In this sense, strength is a passive quality, and is opposed to weakness or frangibility.
  3. Power or vigor of any kind. This act / Shall crush the strength of Satan. – Milton. Strength there must be either of love or war. – Holyday.
  4. Power of resisting attacks; fastness; as, the strength of a castle or fort.
  5. Support; that which supports; that which supplies strength; security. God is our refuge and strength. – Ps. xlvi.
  6. Power of mind; intellectual force; the power of any faculty; as, strength of memory; strength of reason; strength of judgment.
  7. Spirit; animation. Methinks I feel new strength within me rise. – Milton.
  8. Force of writing; vigor; nervous diction. The strength of words, of style, of expression and the like, consists in the full and forcible exhibition of ideas, by which a sensible or deep impression is made on the mind of a hearer or reader. It is distinguished from softness or sweetness. Strength of language enforces an argument, produces conviction, or excites wonder or other strong emotion; softness and sweetness give pleasure. And praise the easy vigor of a line, / Where Denham's strength and Waller's sweetness join. – Pope.
  9. Vividness; as, strength of colors or coloring.
  10. Spirit; the quality of any liquor which has the power of affecting the taste, or of producing sensible effects on other bodies; as, the strength of wine or spirit; the strength of an acid.
  11. The virtue or spirit of any vegetable, or of its juices or qualities.
  12. Legal or moral force; validity; the quality of binding, uniting or securing; as, the strength of social or legal obligations; the strength of law; the strength of public opinion or custom.
  13. Vigor; natural force; as, the strength of natural affection.
  14. That which supports; confidence. The allies, after a successful summer, are too apt upon the strength of it to neglect preparation for the ensuing campaign. – Addison.
  15. Amount of force, military or naval; an army or navy; number of troops or ships well appointed. What is the strength of the enemy by land, or by sea?
  16. Soundness; force; the quality that convinces, persuades or commands assent; the strength of an argument or of reasoning; the strength of evidence.
  17. Vehemence; force proceeding from motion and proportioned to it; as, the strength of wind or a current of water.
  18. Degree of brightness or vividness; as, the strength of light.
  19. Fortification; fortress; as, an inaccessible strength. [Not in use.] – Milton.
  20. Support; maintenance of power. What they boded would be a mischief to us, you are providing shall be one of our principal strengths. [Not used.] – Sprat.

STRENGTH, v.t.

To strengthen. [Not in use.]


Strength
  1. The quality or state of being strong; ability to do or to bear; capacity for exertion or endurance, whether physical, intellectual, or moral; force; vigor; power; as, strength of body or of the arm; strength of mind, of memory, or of judgment.

    All his [Samson's] strength in his hairs were. Chaucer.

    Thou must outlive
    Thy youth, thy strength, thy beauty.
    Milton.

  2. To strengthen.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.
  3. Power to resist force; solidity or toughness; the quality of bodies by which they endure the application of force without breaking or yielding; -- in this sense opposed to frangibility; as, the strength of a bone, of a beam, of a wall, a rope, and the like.

    "The brittle strength of bones." Milton.
  4. Power of resisting attacks; impregnability.

    "Our castle's strength will laugh a siege to scorn." Shak.
  5. That quality which tends to secure results; effective power in an institution or enactment; security; validity; legal or moral force; logical conclusiveness; as, the strength of social or legal obligations; the strength of law; the strength of public opinion; strength of evidence; strength of argument.
  6. One who, or that which, is regarded as embodying or affording force, strength, or firmness; that on which confidence or reliance is based; support; security.

    God is our refuge and strength. Ps. xlvi. 1.

    What they boded would be a mischief to us, you are providing shall be one of our principal strengths. Sprat.

    Certainly there is not a greater strength against temptation. Jer. Taylor.

  7. Force as measured; amount, numbers, or power of any body, as of an army, a navy, and the like; as, what is the strength of the enemy by land, or by sea?
  8. Vigor or style; force of expression; nervous diction; -- said of literary work.

    And praise the easy vigor of a life
    Where Denham's strength and Waller's sweetness join.
    Pope.

  9. Intensity; -- said of light or color.

    Bright Phœbus in his strength. Shak.

  10. Intensity or degree of the distinguishing and essential element; spirit; virtue; excellence; -- said of liquors, solutions, etc.; as, the strength of wine or of acids.
  11. A strong place; a stronghold.

    [Obs.] Shak.

    On, or Upon, the strength of, in reliance upon. "The allies, after a successful summer, are too apt, upon the strength of it, to neglect their preparations for the ensuing campaign." Addison.

    Syn. -- Force; robustness; toughness; hardness; stoutness; brawniness; lustiness; firmness; puissance; support; spirit; validity; authority. See Force.

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Strength

STRENGTH, noun [See Strong.]

1. That property or quality of an animal body by which it is enabled to move itself or other bodies. We say, a sick man has not strength to walk, or to raise his head or his arm. We say, a man has strength to lift a weight, or to draw it. This quality is called also power and force. But force is also used to denote the effect of strength exerted, or the quantity of motion. strength in this sense, is positive, or the power of producing positive motion or action, and is opposed to weakness.

2. Firmness; solidity or toughness; the quality of bodies by which they sustain the application of force without breaking or yielding. Thus we speak of the strength of a bone, the strength of a beam, the strength of a wall, the strength of a rope. In this sense, strength is a passive quality, and is opposed to weakness or frangibility.

3. Power or vigor of any kind.

This act shall crush the strength of Satan.

STRENGTH there must be either of love or war.

4. Power of resisting attacks; fastness; as the strength of a castle or fort.

5. Support; that which supports; that which supplies strength; security.

God is our refuge and strength Psalms 46:1.

6. Power of mind; intellectual force; the power of any faculty; as strength of memory; strength of reason; strength of judgment.

7. Spirit; animation.

Me thinks I feel new strength within me rise.

8. Force of writing; vigor; nervous diction. The strength of words, of style, of expression and the like, consists in the full and forcible exhibition of ideas, by which a sensible or deep impression is made on the mind of a hearer or reader. It is distinguished from softness or sweetness. strength of language enforces an argument, produces conviction, or excites wonder or other strong emotion; softness and sweetness give pleasure.

And praise the easy vigor of a line, where Denhams strength and Wellers sweetness join.

9. Vividness; as strength of colors or coloring.

10. Spirit; the quality of any liquor which has the power of affecting the taste, or of producing sensible effects on other bodies; as the strength of wine or spirit; the strength of an acid.

11. The virtue or spirit of any vegetable, or of its juices or qualities.

12. Legal or moral force; validity; the quality of binding, uniting or securing; as the strength of social or legal obligations; the strength of law; the strength of public opinion or custom.

13. Vigor; natural force; as the strength of natural affection.

14. That which supports; confidence.

The allies, after a successful summer, are too apt upon the strength of it to neglect preparation for the ensuing campaign.

15. Amount of force, military or naval; an army or navy; number of troops or ships well appointed. What is the strength of the enemy by land, or by sea?

16. Soundness; force; the quality that convinces, persuades or commands assent; as the strength of an argument or of reasoning; the strength of evidence.

17. Vehemence; force proceeding from motion and proportioned to it; as the strength of wind or a current of water.

18. Degree of brightness or vividness; as the strength of light.

19. Fortification; fortress; as an inaccessible strength [Not in use.]

20. Support; maintenance of power.

What they boded would be a mischief to us, you are providing shall be one of our principal strengths. [Not used.]

STRENGTH, verb intransitive To strengthen. [Not in use.]

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

recompense

REC'OMPENSE, v.t.

1. To compensate; to make return of an equivalent for any thing given, done or suffered; as, to recompense a person for services, for fidelity or for sacrifices of time, for loss or damages.

The word is followed by the person or the service. We recompense a person for his services, or we recompense his kindness. It is usually found more easy to neglect than to recompense a favor.

2. To require; to repay; to return an equivalent; in a bad sense.

Recompense to no man evil for evil. Rom. 12.

3. To make an equivalent return in profit or produce. The labor of man is recompensed by the fruits of the earth.

4. To compensate; to make amends by any thing equivalent.

Solyman - said he would find occasion for them to recompense that disgrace.

5. To make restitution or an equivalent return for. Num. 5.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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