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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [stern]

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stern

STERN, a. [G., staring; stubborn. See Stare, Starck, Stark, with which this word is probably connected.]

1. Severe; austere; fixed with an aspect of severity and authority; as a stern look; a stern countenance; a stern frown.

I would outstare the sternest eyes that look.

2. Severe of manner; rigid; harsh; cruel.

Stern as tutors, and as uncles hard.

Ambition should be made of sterner stuff.

3. Hard; afflictive.

If wolves had at thy gate howld that stern time.

4. Rigidly stedfast; immovable.

Stern virtue is the growth of few soils.

STERN, n.

1. The hind part of a ship or other vessel, or of a boat; the part opposite to the stern or prow. This part of a ship is terminated by the tafferel above, and by the counters below.

2. Post of management; direction.

An sit at chiefest stern of public weal. [Not in use. We now say, to sit at the helm.]

3. The hinder part of any thing. [Not elegant.]

By the stern, is a phrase which denotes that a ship is more deeply laden abaft than forward.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [stern]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

STERN, a. [G., staring; stubborn. See Stare, Starck, Stark, with which this word is probably connected.]

1. Severe; austere; fixed with an aspect of severity and authority; as a stern look; a stern countenance; a stern frown.

I would outstare the sternest eyes that look.

2. Severe of manner; rigid; harsh; cruel.

Stern as tutors, and as uncles hard.

Ambition should be made of sterner stuff.

3. Hard; afflictive.

If wolves had at thy gate howld that stern time.

4. Rigidly stedfast; immovable.

Stern virtue is the growth of few soils.

STERN, n.

1. The hind part of a ship or other vessel, or of a boat; the part opposite to the stern or prow. This part of a ship is terminated by the tafferel above, and by the counters below.

2. Post of management; direction.

An sit at chiefest stern of public weal. [Not in use. We now say, to sit at the helm.]

3. The hinder part of any thing. [Not elegant.]

By the stern, is a phrase which denotes that a ship is more deeply laden abaft than forward.

STERN, a. [Sax. styrn, stern; G. starr, staring; störrig, stubborn. See Stare, Starch, Stark, with which this word is probably connected. Gr. στερεος.]

  1. Severe; austere; fixed with an aspect of severity and authority; as, a stern look; a stern countenance; a stern frown. I would outstare the sternest eyes that look. – Shak.
  2. Severe of manner; rigid; harsh; cruel. Stern as tutors, and as uncles hard. – Dryden. Ambition should be made of sterner stuff. – Shak.
  3. Hard; afflictive. If wolves had at thy gate howl'd that stern time. – Shak.
  4. Rigidly steadfast; immovable. Stern virtue is the growth of few soils. – Hamilton.

STERN, n. [Sax. steor and ern, place; the steer-place, that is, helm-place.]

  1. The hind part of a ship or other vessel, or of a boat; the part opposite to the stem or prow. This part of a ship is terminated by the tafferel above, and by the counters below. – Mar. Dict.
  2. Post of management; direction. And sit at chiefest stern of public weal. – Shak. [Not in use. We now say, to sit at the helm.]
  3. The hinder part of any thing. [Not elegant.] Spenser. By the stern, is a phrase which denotes that a ship is more deeply laden abaft than forward.

Stern
  1. The black tern.
  2. Having a certain hardness or severity of nature, manner, or aspect; hard; severe; rigid; rigorous; austere; fixed; unchanging; unrelenting; hence, serious; resolute; harsh; as, a sternresolve; a stern necessity; a stern heart; a stern gaze; a stern decree.

    The sterne wind so loud gan to rout. Chaucer.

    I would outstare the sternest eyes that look. Shak.

    When that the poor have cried, Cæsar hath wept;
    Ambition should be made of sterner stuff.
    Shak.

    Stern as tutors, and as uncles hard. Dryden.

    These barren rocks, your stern inheritance. Wordsworth.

    Syn. -- Gloomy; sullen; forbidding; strict; unkind; hard- hearted; unfeeling; cruel; pitiless.

  3. The helm or tiller of a vessel or boat; also, the rudder.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.
  4. Being in the stern, or being astern; as, the stern davits.

    Stern board (Naut.), a going or falling astern; a loss of way in making a tack; as, to make a stern board. See Board, n., 8 (b). -- Stern chase. (Naut.) (a) See under Chase, n. (b) A stern chaser. -- Stern chaser (Naut.), a cannon placed in a ship's stern, pointing backward, and intended to annoy a ship that is in pursuit. -- Stern fast (Naut.), a rope used to confine the stern of a ship or other vessel, as to a wharf or buoy. -- Stern frame (Naut.), the framework of timber forms the stern of a ship. -- Stern knee. See Sternson. -- Stern port (Naut.), a port, or opening, in the stern of a ship. -- Stern sheets (Naut.), that part of an open boat which is between the stern and the aftmost seat of the rowers, -- usually furnished with seats for passengers. -- Stern wheel, a paddle wheel attached to the stern of the steamboat which it propels.

  5. The after or rear end of a ship or other vessel, or of a boat; the part opposite to the stem, or prow.
  6. Fig.: The post of management or direction.

    And sit chiefest stern of public weal. Shak.

  7. The hinder part of anything.

    Spenser.
  8. The tail of an animal; -- now used only of the tail of a dog.

    By the stern. (Naut.) See By the head, under By.

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Stern

STERN, adjective [G., staring; stubborn. See Stare, Starck, Stark, with which this word is probably connected.]

1. Severe; austere; fixed with an aspect of severity and authority; as a stern look; a stern countenance; a stern frown.

I would outstare the sternest eyes that look.

2. Severe of manner; rigid; harsh; cruel.

STERN as tutors, and as uncles hard.

Ambition should be made of sterner stuff.

3. Hard; afflictive.

If wolves had at thy gate howld that stern time.

4. Rigidly stedfast; immovable.

STERN virtue is the growth of few soils.

STERN, noun

1. The hind part of a ship or other vessel, or of a boat; the part opposite to the stern or prow. This part of a ship is terminated by the tafferel above, and by the counters below.

2. Post of management; direction.

An sit at chiefest stern of public weal. [Not in use. We now say, to sit at the helm.]

3. The hinder part of any thing. [Not elegant.]

By the stern is a phrase which denotes that a ship is more deeply laden abaft than forward.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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vagabond

VAG'ABOND, a. [L. vagabundus, from vagor, to wander; from the root of wag.]

1. Wandering; moving from place to place without any settled habitation; as a vagabond exile.

2. Wandering; floating about without any certain direction; driven to and fro.

Like to a vagabond flag upon the stream.

VAG'ABOND, n. [supra.] A vagrant; one who wanders from town to town or place to place, having no certain dwelling, or not abiding in it. By the laws of England and of the United States, vagabonds are liable to be taken up and punished.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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