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Thursday - October 18, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [stem]

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stem

STEM, n. [G., stock, stem, race. The primary sense is to set, to fix.]

1. The principal body of a tree, shrub or plant of any kind; the main stock; the firm part which supports the branches.

After thy are shot up thirty feet in length, they spread a very large top, having no bough or twig on the stem.

The lowring spring with lavish rain, beats down the slender stem and bearded grain.

2. The peduncle of the fructification, or the pedicle of a flower; that which supports the flower or the fruit of a planet.

3. The stock of a family; a race or generation of progenitors; as a noble stem.

Learn well their lineage and their ancient stem.

4. Progeny; branch of a family.

Of that victorious stock.

5. In a ship, a circular piece of timber, to which the two sides of a ship are united at the fore end. The lower end of it is scarfed to the keel, and the bowsprit rests upon its upper end. From stem to stern, is from one end of the ship to the other, or through the whole length.

STEM, v.t.

1. To oppose or resist, as a current; or to make progress against a current. We say, the ship was not able with all her sails to stem the tide.

They stem the flood with their erected breasts.

2. To stop; to check; as a stream or moving force.

At length Erasmus, that great injurd name, stemmd the wild torrent of a barbrous age, and drove those holy Vandals off the stage.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [stem]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

STEM, n. [G., stock, stem, race. The primary sense is to set, to fix.]

1. The principal body of a tree, shrub or plant of any kind; the main stock; the firm part which supports the branches.

After thy are shot up thirty feet in length, they spread a very large top, having no bough or twig on the stem.

The lowring spring with lavish rain, beats down the slender stem and bearded grain.

2. The peduncle of the fructification, or the pedicle of a flower; that which supports the flower or the fruit of a planet.

3. The stock of a family; a race or generation of progenitors; as a noble stem.

Learn well their lineage and their ancient stem.

4. Progeny; branch of a family.

Of that victorious stock.

5. In a ship, a circular piece of timber, to which the two sides of a ship are united at the fore end. The lower end of it is scarfed to the keel, and the bowsprit rests upon its upper end. From stem to stern, is from one end of the ship to the other, or through the whole length.

STEM, v.t.

1. To oppose or resist, as a current; or to make progress against a current. We say, the ship was not able with all her sails to stem the tide.

They stem the flood with their erected breasts.

2. To stop; to check; as a stream or moving force.

At length Erasmus, that great injurd name, stemmd the wild torrent of a barbrous age, and drove those holy Vandals off the stage.

STEM, n.1 [Sax. stemn; G. stamm, stock, stem, race; D. and Sw. stam; Dan. stamme; Sans. stamma. The Latin has stemma, in the sense of the stock of a family or race. The primary sense is to set, to fix.]

  1. The principal body of a tree, shrub or plant of any kind; the main stock; the firm part which supports the branches. After they are shot up thirty feet in length, they spread a very large top, having no bough or twig on the stem. – Ralegh. The low'ring spring with lavish rain, / Beats down the slender stem and bearded grain. – Dryden.
  2. The peduncle of the fructification, or the pedicle of a flower; that which supports the flower or the fruit of a plant; the petiole or leaf-steam.
  3. The stock of a family; a race or generation of progenitors; as, a noble stern. – Milton. Learn well their lineage and their ancient stem. – Tickel.
  4. Progeny; branch of a family. This is a stem / Of that victorious stock. – Shak.
  5. In a ship, a circular piece of timber, to which the two sides of a ship are united at the fore end. The lower end of it is scarfed to the keel, and the bowsprit rests upon its upper end. [D. semen.] – Mar. Dict. From stem to stern, is from one end of the ship to the other, or through the whole length.

STEM, n.2

In music, the short perpendicular line added to a note.


STEM, v.t.

  1. To oppose or resist, as a current; or to make progress against a current. We say, the ship was not able with all her sails to stem the tide. They stem the flood with their erected breasts. – Denham.
  2. To stop; to check; as a stream or moving force. At length Erasmus, that great injur'd name, / Stemm'd the wild torrent of a barb'rous age, / And drove those holy Vandals off the stage. – Pope.

Stem
  1. To gleam.

    [Obs.]

    His head bald, that shone as any glass, . . .
    [And] stemed as a furnace of a leed [caldron].
    Chaucer.

  2. A gleam of light; flame.

    [Obs.]
  3. The principal body of a tree, shrub, or plant, of any kind; the main stock; the part which supports the branches or the head or top.

    After they are shot up thirty feet in length, they spread a very large top, having no bough nor twig in the trunk or the stem. Sir W. Raleigh.

    The lowering spring, with lavish rain,
    Beats down the slender stem and breaded grain.
    Dryden.

  4. To remove the stem or stems from; as, to stem cherries; to remove the stem and its appendages (ribs and veins) from; as, to stem tobacco leaves.
  5. To oppose or cut with, or as with, the stem of a vessel; to resist, or make progress against; to stop or check the flow of, as a current.

    "An argosy to stem the waves." Shak.

    [They] stem the flood with their erected breasts. Denham.

    Stemmed the wild torrent of a barbarous age. Pope.

  6. To move forward against an obstacle, as a vessel against a current.

    Stemming nightly toward the pole. Milton.

  7. A little branch which connects a fruit, flower, or leaf with a main branch; a peduncle, pedicel, or petiole; as, the stem of an apple or a cherry.
  8. To ram, as clay, into a blasting hole.
  9. The stock of a family; a race or generation of progenitors.

    "All that are of noble stem." Milton.

    While I do pray, learn here thy stem
    And true descent.
    Herbert.

  10. A branch of a family.

    This is a stem
    Of that victorious stock.
    Shak.

  11. A curved piece of timber to which the two sides of a ship are united at the fore end. The lower end of it is scarfed to the keel, and the bowsprit rests upon its upper end. Hence, the forward part of a vessel; the bow.
  12. Fig.: An advanced or leading position; the lookout.

    Wolsey sat at the stem more than twenty years. Fuller.

  13. Anything resembling a stem or stalk; as, the stem of a tobacco pipe; the stem of a watch case, or that part to which the ring, by which it is suspended, is attached.
  14. That part of a plant which bears leaves, or rudiments of leaves, whether rising above ground or wholly subterranean.
  15. The entire central axis of a feather.

    (b)
  16. The short perpendicular line added to the body of a note; the tail of a crotchet, quaver, semiquaver, etc.
  17. The part of an inflected word which remains unchanged (except by euphonic variations) throughout a given inflection; theme; base.

    From stem to stern (Naut.), from one end of the ship to the other, or through the whole length. -- Stem leaf (Bot.), a leaf growing from the stem of a plant, as contrasted with a basal or radical leaf.

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Stem

STEM, noun [G., stock, stem race. The primary sense is to set, to fix.]

1. The principal body of a tree, shrub or plant of any kind; the main stock; the firm part which supports the branches.

After thy are shot up thirty feet in length, they spread a very large top, having no bough or twig on the stem

The lowring spring with lavish rain, beats down the slender stem and bearded grain.

2. The peduncle of the fructification, or the pedicle of a flower; that which supports the flower or the fruit of a planet.

3. The stock of a family; a race or generation of progenitors; as a noble stem

Learn well their lineage and their ancient stem

4. Progeny; branch of a family.

Of that victorious stock.

5. In a ship, a circular piece of timber, to which the two sides of a ship are united at the fore end. The lower end of it is scarfed to the keel, and the bowsprit rests upon its upper end. From stem to stern, is from one end of the ship to the other, or through the whole length.

STEM, verb transitive

1. To oppose or resist, as a current; or to make progress against a current. We say, the ship was not able with all her sails to stem the tide.

They stem the flood with their erected breasts.

2. To stop; to check; as a stream or moving force.

At length Erasmus, that great injurd name, stemmd the wild torrent of a barbrous age, and drove those holy Vandals off the stage.

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The use of accurate definitions, based upon biblical context, is paramount in teaching the application of God's word to our daily lives.

— Todd (Colorado Springs, CO)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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CHALDAISM, n. An idiom or peculiarity in the Chaldee dialect.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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