E_WARNING Error in file class.myPage.php at line 140: session_start(): open(/home/mshaffer/_common_/session_data//sess_22b61lc4qjifsscucimj89qlu0, O_RDWR) failed: Disk quota exceeded (122)
#0  - file - UNKNOWN( - line - UNKNOWN): ErrorHandler(2, 'session_start(): open(/home/mshaffer/_common_/session_data//sess_22b61lc4qjifsscucimj89qlu0, O_RDWR) failed: Disk quota exceeded (122)', '/home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/php/classes/class.myPage.php', 140, Array)
#1 /home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/php/classes/class.myPage.php(140): session_start()
#2 /home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/php/include_pre.php(165): sessionStart()
#3 /home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/page.php(7): require_once('/home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/php/include_pre.php')
E_WARNING Error in file class.myPage.php at line 261: session_write_close(): open(/home/mshaffer/_common_/session_data//sess_22b61lc4qjifsscucimj89qlu0, O_RDWR) failed: Disk quota exceeded (122)
#0  - file - UNKNOWN( - line - UNKNOWN): ErrorHandler(2, 'session_write_close(): open(/home/mshaffer/_common_/session_data//sess_22b61lc4qjifsscucimj89qlu0, O_RDWR) failed: Disk quota exceeded (122)', '/home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/php/classes/class.myPage.php', 261, Array)
#1 /home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/php/classes/class.myPage.php(261): session_write_close()
#2 /home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/page.php(12): endPage()
E_WARNING Error in file class.myPage.php at line 261: session_write_close(): Failed to write session data (files). Please verify that the current setting of session.save_path is correct (/home/mshaffer/_common_/session_data/)
#0  - file - UNKNOWN( - line - UNKNOWN): ErrorHandler(2, 'session_write_close(): Failed to write session data (files). Please verify that the current setting of session.save_path is correct (/home/mshaffer/_common_/session_data/)', '/home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/php/classes/class.myPage.php', 261, Array)
#1 /home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/php/classes/class.myPage.php(261): session_write_close()
#2 /home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/page.php(12): endPage()
Steel [ STEEL, n. [G.]1. Iron combined with a small portion of carbon; iron ... ] :: Search the 1828 Noah Webster's Dictionary of the English Language (FREE) :: 1828.mshaffer.com
HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Monday - November 11, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [steel]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

steel

STEEL, n. [G.]

1. Iron combined with a small portion of carbon; iron refined and hardened, used in making instruments, and particularly useful as the material of edged tools. It is called in chemistry, carburet of iron; but this is more usually the denomination of plumbago.

2. Figuratively, weapons; particularly, offensive weapons, swords, spears and the like.

Brave Macbeth with his brandishd steel.

-- While doubting thus he stood, receivd the steel bathd in this brothers blood.

3. Medicines composed of steel, as steel fillings.

After relaxing, steel strengthens the solids.

4. Extreme hardness; as heads or hearts of steel.

STEEL, a. Made of steel; as a steel plate or buckle.

STEEL, v.t.

1. To overlay, point or edge with steel; as, to steel the point of a sword; to steel a razor; to steel an ax.

2. To make hard or extremely hard.

O God of battles, steel my soldiers hearts.

Lies well steeld with weighty arguments.

3. To make hard; to make insensible or obdurate; as, to steel the heart against pity; to steel the mind or heart against reproof or admonition.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [steel]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

STEEL, n. [G.]

1. Iron combined with a small portion of carbon; iron refined and hardened, used in making instruments, and particularly useful as the material of edged tools. It is called in chemistry, carburet of iron; but this is more usually the denomination of plumbago.

2. Figuratively, weapons; particularly, offensive weapons, swords, spears and the like.

Brave Macbeth with his brandishd steel.

-- While doubting thus he stood, receivd the steel bathd in this brothers blood.

3. Medicines composed of steel, as steel fillings.

After relaxing, steel strengthens the solids.

4. Extreme hardness; as heads or hearts of steel.

STEEL, a. Made of steel; as a steel plate or buckle.

STEEL, v.t.

1. To overlay, point or edge with steel; as, to steel the point of a sword; to steel a razor; to steel an ax.

2. To make hard or extremely hard.

O God of battles, steel my soldiers hearts.

Lies well steeld with weighty arguments.

3. To make hard; to make insensible or obdurate; as, to steel the heart against pity; to steel the mind or heart against reproof or admonition.

STEEL, a.

Made of steel; as, a steel plate or buckle.


STEEL, n. [Sax. style; D. staal; G. stahl; Dan. staal; Sw. stål; probably from setting, fixing, hardness; G. stellen.]

  1. Iron combined with a small but definite portion of carbon. It is called in chimistry, carburet of iron. It is used in making instruments, and particularly useful as the material of edged tools. Dr. Thomas Thomson considers that steel is most probably composed of 20 equivalents of iron, and 1 equivalent of carbon. After relaxing, steel strengthens the solids. – Arbuthnot.
  2. Figuratively, weapons; particularly, offensive weapon; swords, spears and the like. Brave Macbeth with his brandish'd steel. – Shak. While doubting thus he stood, / Receiv'd the steel bath'd in his brother's blood. – Dryden.
  3. Extreme hardness; as, heads or hearts of steel.

STEEL, v.t.

  1. To overlay, point or edge with steel; as, to steel the point of a sword; to steel a razor; to steel an ax.
  2. To make hard or extremely hard. God of battles, steel my soldiers' hearts. – Shak. Lies well steel'd with weighty arguments. – Shak.
  3. To make hard; to make insensible or obdurate; as, to steel the heart against pity; to steel the mind or heart against reproof or admonition.

Steel
  1. A variety of iron intermediate in composition and properties between wrought iron and cast iron (containing between one half of one per cent and one and a half per cent of carbon), and consisting of an alloy of iron with an iron carbide. Steel, unlike wrought iron, can be tempered, and retains magnetism. Its malleability decreases, and fusibility increases, with an increase in carbon.
  2. To overlay, point, or edge with steel; as, to steel a razor; to steel an ax.
  3. An instrument or implement made of steel

    ; as: --

    (a)

  4. To make hard or strong; hence, to make insensible or obdurate.

    Lies well steeled with weighty arguments. Shak.

    O God of battles! steel my soldier's hearts. Shak.

    Why will you fight against so sweet a passion,
    And steel your heart to such a world of charms?
    Addison.

  5. Fig.: Anything of extreme hardness; that which is characterized by sternness or rigor.

    "Heads of steel." Johnson. "Manhood's heart of steel." Byron.
  6. Fig.: To cause to resemble steel, as in smoothness, polish, or other qualities.

    These waters, steeled
    By breezeless air to smoothest polish.
    Wordsworth.

  7. A chalybeate medicine.

    Dunglison.

    * Steel is often used in the formation of compounds, generally of obvious meaning; as, steel-clad, steel- girt, steel-hearted, steel-plated, steel-pointed, etc.

    Bessemer steel (Metal.) See in the Vocabulary. -- Blister steel. (Metal.) See under Blister. -- Cast steel (Metal.), a fine variety of steel, originally made by smelting blister or cementation steel; hence, ordinarily, steel of any process of production when remelted and cast. -- Cromium steel (Metal.), a hard, tenacious variety containing a little cromium, and somewhat resembling tungsten steel. -- Mild steel (Metal.), a kind of steel having a lower proportion of carbon than ordinary steel, rendering it softer and more malleable. -- Puddled steel (Metal.), a variety of steel produced from cast iron by the puddling process. -- Steel duck (Zoöl.), the goosander, or merganser. [Prov. Eng.] -- Steel mill. (a) (Firearms) See Wheel lock, under Wheel. (b) A mill which has steel grinding surfaces. (c) A mill where steel is manufactured. -- Steel trap, a trap for catching wild animals. It consists of two iron jaws, which close by means of a powerful steel spring when the animal disturbs the catch, or tongue, by which they are kept open. -- Steel wine, wine, usually sherry, in which steel filings have been placed for a considerable time, -- used as a medicine. -- Tincture of steel (Med.), an alcoholic solution of the chloride of iron. -- Tungsten steel (Metal.), a variety of steel containing a small amount of tungsten, and noted for its tenacity and hardness, as well as for its malleability and tempering qualities. It is also noted for its magnetic properties.

  8. To cover, as an electrotype plate, with a thin layer of iron by electrolysis. The iron thus deposited is very hard, like steel.
1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

87

648

70

697

101

692
Steel

STEEL, noun [G.]

1. Iron combined with a small portion of carbon; iron refined and hardened, used in making instruments, and particularly useful as the material of edged tools. It is called in chemistry, carburet of iron; but this is more usually the denomination of plumbago.

2. Figuratively, weapons; particularly, offensive weapons, swords, spears and the like.

Brave Macbeth with his brandishd steel

-- While doubting thus he stood, receivd the steel bathd in this brothers blood.

3. Medicines composed of steel as steel fillings.

After relaxing, steel strengthens the solids.

4. Extreme hardness; as heads or hearts of steel

STEEL, adjective Made of steel; as a steel plate or buckle.

STEEL, verb transitive

1. To overlay, point or edge with steel; as, to steel the point of a sword; to steel a razor; to steel an ax.

2. To make hard or extremely hard.

O God of battles, steel my soldiers hearts.

Lies well steeld with weighty arguments.

3. To make hard; to make insensible or obdurate; as, to steel the heart against pity; to steel the mind or heart against reproof or admonition.

Why 1828?

0
3
 


I love this dictronary

— Pam (Salisbury, MD)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

ramequins

RAM'EQUINS, n. In cookery, small slices of bread covered with a farce of cheese and eggs.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

187

353

Compact Edition

147

123

CD-ROM

116

96

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.489 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top