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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [stay]

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stay

STAY, v.i. pret. staid, for stayed. [L., to stand.]

1. To remain; to continue in a place; to abide for any indefinite time. Do you stay here, while I go to the next house. Stay here a week. We staid at the Hotel Montmorenci.

Stay, I command you; stay and hear me first.

2. To continue in a state.

The flames augment, and stay at their full highth, then languish to decay.

3. To wait; to attend; to forbear to act.

I stay for Turnus.

Would ye stay for them from having husbands? Ruth 1.

4. To stop; to stand still.

She would command the hasty sun to stay.

5. To dwell.

I must stay a little on one action.

6. To rest; to rely; to confide in; to trust.

Because ye despise this word, and trust in oppression, and stay thereon--Isaiah 30.

STAY, v.t. pret. and pp. staid, for stayed.

1. To stop; to hold from proceeding; to withhold; to restrain.

All that may stay the mind from thinking that true which they heartily wish were false.

To stay these sudden gusts of passion.

2. To delay; to obstruct; to hinder from proceeding.

Your ships are staid at Venice.

I was willing to stay my reader on an argument that appeared to me to be new.

3. To keep from departure; as, you might have staid me here.

4. To stop from motion or falling; to prop; to hold up; to support.

Aaron and Hur stayed up his hands. Exodus 17.

Sallows and reeds for vineyards useful found to stay thy vines.

5. To support from sinking; to sustain with strength; as, to take a luncheon to stay the stomach.

STAY, n.

1. Continuance in a place; abode for a time indefinite; as, you make a short stay in this city.

Embrace the hero, and his stay implore.

2. Stand; stop; cessation of motion or progression.

Affairs of state seemd rather to stand at a stay.

[But in this sense, we now use stand; to be at a stand.]

3. Stop; obstruction; hinderance from progress.

Grievd with each step, tormented with each stay.

4. Restraint of passion; moderation; caution; steadiness; sobriety.

With prudent stay, he long deferrd the rough contention.

5. A fixed state.

Alas, what stay is there in human state!

6. Prop; support.

Trees serve as so many stays for their vines.

My only strength and stay!

The Lord is my stay. Psalm 18.

The stay and the staff, the means of supporting and preserving life. Isaiah 3.

7. Steadiness of conduct.

8. In the rigging of a ship, a large strong rope employed to support the mast, by being extended from its upper end to the stem of the ship. The fore-stay reaches from the foremast head towards the bowsprit end; the main-stay extends to the ships stem; the mizen-stay is stretched to a collar on the main-mast, above the quarter deck, &c.

Stays, in seamanship, implies the operation of going about or changing the course of a ship, with a shifting of the sails. To be in stays, is to lie with the head to the wind, and the sails so arranged as to check her progress.

To miss stays, to fail in the attempt to go about.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [stay]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

STAY, v.i. pret. staid, for stayed. [L., to stand.]

1. To remain; to continue in a place; to abide for any indefinite time. Do you stay here, while I go to the next house. Stay here a week. We staid at the Hotel Montmorenci.

Stay, I command you; stay and hear me first.

2. To continue in a state.

The flames augment, and stay at their full highth, then languish to decay.

3. To wait; to attend; to forbear to act.

I stay for Turnus.

Would ye stay for them from having husbands? Ruth 1.

4. To stop; to stand still.

She would command the hasty sun to stay.

5. To dwell.

I must stay a little on one action.

6. To rest; to rely; to confide in; to trust.

Because ye despise this word, and trust in oppression, and stay thereon--Isaiah 30.

STAY, v.t. pret. and pp. staid, for stayed.

1. To stop; to hold from proceeding; to withhold; to restrain.

All that may stay the mind from thinking that true which they heartily wish were false.

To stay these sudden gusts of passion.

2. To delay; to obstruct; to hinder from proceeding.

Your ships are staid at Venice.

I was willing to stay my reader on an argument that appeared to me to be new.

3. To keep from departure; as, you might have staid me here.

4. To stop from motion or falling; to prop; to hold up; to support.

Aaron and Hur stayed up his hands. Exodus 17.

Sallows and reeds for vineyards useful found to stay thy vines.

5. To support from sinking; to sustain with strength; as, to take a luncheon to stay the stomach.

STAY, n.

1. Continuance in a place; abode for a time indefinite; as, you make a short stay in this city.

Embrace the hero, and his stay implore.

2. Stand; stop; cessation of motion or progression.

Affairs of state seemd rather to stand at a stay.

[But in this sense, we now use stand; to be at a stand.]

3. Stop; obstruction; hinderance from progress.

Grievd with each step, tormented with each stay.

4. Restraint of passion; moderation; caution; steadiness; sobriety.

With prudent stay, he long deferrd the rough contention.

5. A fixed state.

Alas, what stay is there in human state!

6. Prop; support.

Trees serve as so many stays for their vines.

My only strength and stay!

The Lord is my stay. Psalm 18.

The stay and the staff, the means of supporting and preserving life. Isaiah 3.

7. Steadiness of conduct.

8. In the rigging of a ship, a large strong rope employed to support the mast, by being extended from its upper end to the stem of the ship. The fore-stay reaches from the foremast head towards the bowsprit end; the main-stay extends to the ships stem; the mizen-stay is stretched to a collar on the main-mast, above the quarter deck, &c.

Stays, in seamanship, implies the operation of going about or changing the course of a ship, with a shifting of the sails. To be in stays, is to lie with the head to the wind, and the sails so arranged as to check her progress.

To miss stays, to fail in the attempt to go about.

STAY, n.

  1. Continuance in a place; abode for a time indefinite; as, you make a short stay in this city. Embrace the hero, and his stay implore. – Waller.
  2. Stand; stop; cessation of motion or progression. Affairs of state seem'd rather to stand at a stay. – Hayward. [But in this sense, we now use stand; to be at a stand.]
  3. Stop; obstruction; hinderance from progress. Griev'd with each step, tormented with each stay. – Fairfax.
  4. Restraint of passion; moderation; caution; steadiness; sobriety. With prudent stay, he long defered / The rough contention. [Obs.] – Philips.
  5. A fixed state. Alas, what stay is there in human state! Dryden.
  6. Prop; support. Trees serve as so many stays for their vines. – Addison. My only strength and stay! – Milton. The Lord is my stay. – Ps. xviii. The stay and the staff, the means of supporting and preserving life. – Is. iii.
  7. Steadiness of conduct. – Todd.
  8. In the rigging of a ship, a large strong rope employed to support the mast, by being extended from its upper end to the stem of the ship. The fore-stay reaches from the foremast head toward the bowsprit end; the main-stay extends to the ship's stem; the mizzen-stay is stretched to a collar on the main-mast, above the quarter deck, &c. – Mar. Dict. Stays, in seamanship, implies the operation of going about or changing the course of a ship, with a shifting of the sails. To be in stays, is to lie with the head to the wind, and the sails so arranged as to check her progress. To miss stays, to fail in the attempt to go about. – Mar. Dict.

STAY, v.i. [pret. staid, for stayed. Ir. stadam; Sp. estay, a stay of a ship; estada, stay, a remaining; estiar, to stop; Port. estada, abode; estaes, stays of a ship; estear, to stay, to prop; W. ystad, state; ystadu, to stay or remain; Fr. etai, etayer; D. stut, stutten. This word seems to be connected with state, and if so, is a derivative from the root of L. sto, to stand. But from the orthography of this word in the Irish, Spanish, and Portuguese, and of steti, the preterit of sto, in Latin, I am led to believe the elementary word was stad or stat. The sense is to set, stop, or hold. It is to be observed further, that stay may be easily deduced from the G. and D. stag, a stay; stag-segel, stay-sail; W. tagu, to stop.]

  1. To remain; to continue in a place; to abide for any indefinite time. Do you stay here, while I go to the next house. Stay here a week. We staid at the Hotel Montmorenci in Paris. – N. W. Stay, I command you; stay and hear me first. – Dryden.
  2. To continue in a state. The flames augment, and stay / At their full highth, then languish to decay. – Dryden.
  3. To wait; to attend; to forbear to act. I stay for Ternus. – Dryden. Would ye stay for them from having husbands? – Ruth i.
  4. To stop; to stand still. She would command the hasty sun to stay. – Spenser.
  5. To dwell. I must stay a little on one action. – Dryden.
  6. To rest; to rely; to confide in; to trust. Because ye despise this word, and trust in oppression, and stay thereon. – Is. xxx.

STAY, v.t. [pret. and pp. staid, for stayed.]

  1. To stop; to hold from proceeding; to withhold; to restrain. All that may stay the mind from thinking that true which they heartily wish were false. – Hooker. To stay these sudden gusts of passion. – Rowe.
  2. To delay; to obstruct; to hinder from proceeding. Your ships are staid at Venice. – Shak. I was willing to stay my reader on an argument that appeared to me to be new. – Locke.
  3. To keep from departure; as, you might have staid me here. – Dryden.
  4. To stop from motion or falling; to prop; to hold up; to support. Aaron and Hur stayed up his hands. – Exod. xvii. Sallows and reeds for vineyards useful found / To stay thy vines. – Dryden.
  5. To support from sinking; to sustain with strength; as, to take a luncheon to stay the stomach.

Stay
  1. A large, strong rope, employed to support a mast, by being extended from the head of one mast down to some other, or to some part of the vessel. Those which lead forward are called fore-and-aft stays; those which lead to the vessel's side are called backstays. See Illust. of Ship.

    In stays, or Hove in stays (Naut.), in the act or situation of staying, or going about from one tack to another. R. H. Dana, Jr. -- Stay holes (Naut.), openings in the edge of a staysail through which the hanks pass which join it to the stay. -- Stay tackle (Naut.), a tackle attached to a stay and used for hoisting or lowering heavy articles over the side. -- To miss stays (Naut.), to fail in the attempt to go about. Totten. -- Triatic stay (Naut.), a rope secured at the ends to the heads of the foremast and mainmast with thimbles spliced to its bight into which the stay tackles hook.

  2. To stop from motion or falling; to prop; to fix firmly; to hold up; to support.

    Aaron and Hur stayed up his hands, the one on the one side, and the other on the other side. Ex. xvii. 12.

    Sallows and reeds . . . for vineyards useful found
    To stay thy vines.
    Dryden.

  3. To remain; to continue in a place; to abide fixed for a space of time; to stop; to stand still.

    She would command the hasty sun to stay. Spenser.

    Stay, I command you; stay and hear me first. Dryden.

    I stay a little longer, as one stays
    To cover up the embers that still burn.
    Longfellow.

  4. That which serves as a prop; a support.

    "My only strength and stay." Milton.

    Trees serve as so many stays for their vines. Addison.

    Lord Liverpool is the single stay of this ministry. Coleridge.

  5. To support from sinking; to sustain with strength; to satisfy in part or for the time.

    He has devoured a whole loaf of bread and butter, and it has not staid his stomach for a minute. Sir W. Scott.

  6. To continue in a state.

    The flames augment, and stay
    At their full height, then languish to decay.
    Dryden.

  7. A corset stiffened with whalebone or other material, worn by women, and rarely by men.

    How the strait stays the slender waist constrain. Gay.

  8. To bear up under; to endure; to support; to resist successfully.

    She will not stay the siege of loving terms,
    Nor bide the encounter of assailing eyes.
    Shak.

  9. To wait; to attend; to forbear to act.

    I'll tell thee all my whole device
    When I am in my coach, which stays for us.
    Shak.

    The father can not stay any longer for the fortune. Locke.

  10. Continuance in a place; abode for a space of time; sojourn; as, you make a short stay in this city.

    Make haste, and leave thy business and thy care;
    No mortal interest can be worth thy stay.
    Dryden.

    Embrace the hero and his stay implore. Waller.

  11. To hold from proceeding; to withhold; to restrain; to stop; to hold.

    Him backward overthrew and down him stayed
    With their rude hands grisly grapplement.
    Spenser.

    All that may stay their minds from thinking that true which they heartly wish were false. Hooker.

  12. To dwell; to tarry; to linger.

    I must stay a little on one action. Dryden.

  13. Cessation of motion or progression; stand; stop.

    Made of sphere metal, never to decay
    Until his revolution was at stay.
    Milton.

    Affairs of state seemed rather to stand at a stay. Hayward.

  14. To hinde(?); to delay; to detain; to keep back.

    Your ships are stayed at Venice. Shak.

    This business staid me in London almost a week. Evelyn.

    I was willing to stay my reader on an argument that appeared to me new. Locke.

  15. To rest; to depend; to rely; to stand; to insist.

    I stay here on my bond. Shak.

    Ye despise this word, and trust in oppression and perverseness, and stay thereon. Isa. xxx. 12.

  16. Hindrance; let; check.

    [Obs.]

    They were able to read good authors without any stay, if the book were not false. Robynson (more's Utopia).

  17. To remain for the purpose of; to wait for.

    "I stay dinner there." Shak.
  18. To come to an end; to cease; as, that day the storm stayed.

    [Archaic]

    Here my commission stays. Shak.

  19. Restraint of passion; moderation; caution; steadiness; sobriety.

    [Obs.] "Not grudging that thy lust hath bounds and stays." Herbert.

    The wisdom, stay, and moderation of the king. Bacon.

    With prudent stay he long deferred
    The rough contention.
    Philips.

  20. To cause to cease; to put an end to.

    Stay your strife. Shak.

    For flattering planets seemed to say
    This child should ills of ages stay.
    Emerson.

  21. To hold out in a race or other contest; as, a horse stays well.

    [Colloq.]
  22. Strictly, a part in tension to hold the parts together, or stiffen them.

    Stay bolt (Mech.), a bolt or short rod, connecting opposite plates, so as to prevent them from being bulged out when acted upon by a pressure which tends to force them apart, as in the leg of a steam boiler. -- Stay busk, a stiff piece of wood, steel, or whalebone, for the front support of a woman's stays. Cf. Busk. -- Stay rod, a rod which acts as a stay, particularly in a steam boiler.

  23. To fasten or secure with stays; as, to stay a flat sheet in a steam boiler.
  24. To change tack; as a ship.
  25. To tack, as a vessel, so that the other side of the vessel shall be presented to the wind.

    To stay a mast (Naut.), to incline it forward or aft, or to one side, by the stays and backstays.

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Stay

STAY, verb intransitive preterit tense staid, for stayed. [Latin , to stand.]

1. To remain; to continue in a place; to abide for any indefinite time. Do you stay here, while I go to the next house. stay here a week. We staid at the Hotel Montmorenci.

STAY, I command you; stay and hear me first.

2. To continue in a state.

The flames augment, and stay at their full highth, then languish to decay.

3. To wait; to attend; to forbear to act.

I stay for Turnus.

Would ye stay for them from having husbands? Ruth 1:13.

4. To stop; to stand still.

She would command the hasty sun to stay

5. To dwell.

I must stay a little on one action.

6. To rest; to rely; to confide in; to trust.

Because ye despise this word, and trust in oppression, and stay thereon--Isaiah 30:12.

STAY, verb transitive preterit tense and participle passive staid, for stayed.

1. To stop; to hold from proceeding; to withhold; to restrain.

All that may stay the mind from thinking that true which they heartily wish were false.

To stay these sudden gusts of passion.

2. To delay; to obstruct; to hinder from proceeding.

Your ships are staid at Venice.

I was willing to stay my reader on an argument that appeared to me to be new.

3. To keep from departure; as, you might have staid me here.

4. To stop from motion or falling; to prop; to hold up; to support.

Aaron and Hur stayed up his hands. Exodus 17:12.

Sallows and reeds for vineyards useful found to stay thy vines.

5. To support from sinking; to sustain with strength; as, to take a luncheon to stay the stomach.

STAY, noun

1. Continuance in a place; abode for a time indefinite; as, you make a short stay in this city.

Embrace the hero, and his stay implore.

2. Stand; stop; cessation of motion or progression.

Affairs of state seemd rather to stand at a stay

[But in this sense, we now use stand; to be at a stand.]

3. Stop; obstruction; hinderance from progress.

Grievd with each step, tormented with each stay

4. Restraint of passion; moderation; caution; steadiness; sobriety.

With prudent stay he long deferrd the rough contention.

5. A fixed state.

Alas, what stay is there in human state!

6. Prop; support.

Trees serve as so many stays for their vines.

My only strength and stay!

The Lord is my stay Psalms 18:18.

The stay and the staff, the means of supporting and preserving life. Isaiah 3:1.

7. Steadiness of conduct.

8. In the rigging of a ship, a large strong rope employed to support the mast, by being extended from its upper end to the stem of the ship. The fore-stay reaches from the foremast head towards the bowsprit end; the main-stay extends to the ships stem; the mizen-stay is stretched to a collar on the main-mast, above the quarter deck, etc.

STAYs, in seamanship, implies the operation of going about or changing the course of a ship, with a shifting of the sails. To be in stays, is to lie with the head to the wind, and the sails so arranged as to check her progress.

To miss stays, to fail in the attempt to go about.

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English has evolved to be more secular and politically correct, definitions of words have also been changed to fit what the society thinks rather than what they meant to be (e.g. marriage). Modern dictionaries often fail to give a right definition.

— JD (Groton, CT)

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IMPORT'ANCE, n.

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2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

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He believes himself a man of importance.

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