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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [state]

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state

STATE, n. [L., to stand, to be fixed.]

1. Condition; the circumstances of a being or thing at any given time. These circumstances may be internal, constitutional or peculiar to the being, or they may have relation to other beings. We say, the body is in a sound state, or it is in a weak state; or it has just recovered from a feeble state. The state of his health is good. The state of his mind is favorable for study. So we say, the state of public affairs calls for the exercise of talents and wisdom. In regard to foreign nations, our affairs are in a good state. So we say, single state, and married state.

Declare the past and present state of things.

2. Modification of any thing.

Keep the state of the question in your eye.

3. Crisis; stationary point; highth; point from which the next movement is regression.

Tumors have their several degrees and times, as beginning, augment, state and declination. [Not in use.]

4. Estate; possession. [See Estate.]

5. A political body, or body politic; the whole body of people united under one government, whatever may be the form of the government.

Municipal law is a rule of conduct prescribed by the supreme power in a state.

More usually the word signifies a political body governed by representatives; a commonwealth; as the States of Greece; the States of America. In this sense, state has sometimes more immediate reference to the government, sometimes to the people or community. Thus when we say, the state has made provision for the paupers, the word has reference to the government or legislature; but when we say, the state is taxed to support paupers, the word refers to the whole people or community.

6. A body of men united by profession, or constituting a community of a particular character; as the civil and ecclesiastical states in Great Britain. But these are sometimes distinguished by the terms church and state. In this case, state signifies the civil community or government only.

7. Rank; condition; quality; as the state of honor.

8. Pomp; appearance of greatness.

In state the monarchs marchd.

Where least of state, there most of love is shown.

9. Dignity; grandeur.

She instructed him how he should keep state, yet with a modest sense of his misfortunes.

10. A seat of dignity.

This chair shall be my state.

11. A canopy; a covering of dignity.

His high throne, under state of richest texture spread-- [Unusual.]

12. A person of high rank. [Not in use.]

13. The principal persons in a government.

The bold design pleasd highly those infernal states.

14. The bodies that constitute the legislature of a country; as the states general.

15. Joined with another word, it denotes public, or what belongs to the community or body politic; as state affairs; state policy.

STATE, v.t.

1. To set; to settle. [See Stated.]

2. To express the particulars of any thing verbally; to represent fully in words; to narrate; to recite. The witnesses stated all the circumstances of the transaction. They are enjoined to state all the particulars. It is the business of the advocate to state the whole case. Let the question be fairly stated.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [state]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

STATE, n. [L., to stand, to be fixed.]

1. Condition; the circumstances of a being or thing at any given time. These circumstances may be internal, constitutional or peculiar to the being, or they may have relation to other beings. We say, the body is in a sound state, or it is in a weak state; or it has just recovered from a feeble state. The state of his health is good. The state of his mind is favorable for study. So we say, the state of public affairs calls for the exercise of talents and wisdom. In regard to foreign nations, our affairs are in a good state. So we say, single state, and married state.

Declare the past and present state of things.

2. Modification of any thing.

Keep the state of the question in your eye.

3. Crisis; stationary point; highth; point from which the next movement is regression.

Tumors have their several degrees and times, as beginning, augment, state and declination. [Not in use.]

4. Estate; possession. [See Estate.]

5. A political body, or body politic; the whole body of people united under one government, whatever may be the form of the government.

Municipal law is a rule of conduct prescribed by the supreme power in a state.

More usually the word signifies a political body governed by representatives; a commonwealth; as the States of Greece; the States of America. In this sense, state has sometimes more immediate reference to the government, sometimes to the people or community. Thus when we say, the state has made provision for the paupers, the word has reference to the government or legislature; but when we say, the state is taxed to support paupers, the word refers to the whole people or community.

6. A body of men united by profession, or constituting a community of a particular character; as the civil and ecclesiastical states in Great Britain. But these are sometimes distinguished by the terms church and state. In this case, state signifies the civil community or government only.

7. Rank; condition; quality; as the state of honor.

8. Pomp; appearance of greatness.

In state the monarchs marchd.

Where least of state, there most of love is shown.

9. Dignity; grandeur.

She instructed him how he should keep state, yet with a modest sense of his misfortunes.

10. A seat of dignity.

This chair shall be my state.

11. A canopy; a covering of dignity.

His high throne, under state of richest texture spread-- [Unusual.]

12. A person of high rank. [Not in use.]

13. The principal persons in a government.

The bold design pleasd highly those infernal states.

14. The bodies that constitute the legislature of a country; as the states general.

15. Joined with another word, it denotes public, or what belongs to the community or body politic; as state affairs; state policy.

STATE, v.t.

1. To set; to settle. [See Stated.]

2. To express the particulars of any thing verbally; to represent fully in words; to narrate; to recite. The witnesses stated all the circumstances of the transaction. They are enjoined to state all the particulars. It is the business of the advocate to state the whole case. Let the question be fairly stated.

STATE, n. [L. status, from sto, to stand, to be fixed; It. stato; Sp. estado; Fr. etât. Hence G. stät, fixed; statt, place, abode, stead; staat, state; stadt, a town or city; D. staat, condition, state; stad, a city, Dan. and Sw. stad; Sans. stidaha, to stand; Pers. istaden, id. State is fixedness or standing.]

  1. Condition; the circumstances of a being or thing at any given time. These circumstances may be internal, constitutional or peculiar to the being, or they may have relation to other beings. We say, the body is in a sound state, or it is in a weak state; or it has just recovered from a feeble state. The state of his health is good. The state of his mind is favorable for study. So we say, the state of public affairs calls for the exercise of talents and wisdom. In regard to foreign nations, our affairs are in a good state. So we say, single state, and married state. Declare the past and present state of things. – Dryden.
  2. Modification of any thing. Keep the state of the question in your eye. – Doyle.
  3. Crisis; stationary point; highth; point from which the next movement is regression. Tumors have their several degrees and times, as beginning, augment, state and declination. [Not in use.] – Wiseman.
  4. Estate, possession. [Obs.] [See Estate.] – Daniel.
  5. A political body, or body politic; the whole body of the people united under one government, whatever may be the form of the government. Municipal law is a rule of conduct prescribed by the supreme power in a state. – Blackstone. More usually the word signifies a political body governed by representatives; a commonwealth; as, the States of Greece; the States of America. In this sense, state has sometimes more immediate reference to the government, sometimes to the people or community. Thus when we say, the state has made provision for the paupers, the word has reference to the government; or legislature; but when we say, the state is taxed to support paupers, the word refers to the whole people or community.
  6. A body of men united by profession, or constituting a community of a particular character; as, the civil and ecclesiastical states in Great Britain. But these are sometimes distinguished by the terms church and state. In this case, state signifies the civil community or government only.
  7. Rank; condition; quality; as, the state of honor. – Shak.
  8. Pomp; appearance of greatness. In state the monarchs march'd. – Dryden. Where least of state, there most of love is shown. – Dryden.
  9. Dignity; grandeur. She instructed him how he should keep state, yet with a modest sense of his misfortunes. – Bacon.
  10. A seat of dignity. This chair shall be my state. – Shak.
  11. A canopy; a covering of dignity. His high throne, under state / Of richest texture spread. [Unusual.] – Milton.
  12. A person of high rank. [Not in use.] – Latimer.
  13. The principal persons in a government. The bold design / Pleas'd highly those infernal states. – Milton.
  14. The bodies that constitute the legislature of a country; as, the states general.
  15. Joined with another word, it denotes public, or what belongs to the community or body politic; as, state affairs; state policy.

STATE, v.t.

  1. To set; to settle. [See Stated.]
  2. To express the particulars of any thing in writing; to set down in detail or in gross; as, to slate an account; to state debt and credit; to state the amount due.
  3. To express the particulars of any thing verbally; to represent fully in words; to narrate; to recite. The witnesses stated all the circumstances of the transaction. They are enjoined to state all the particulars. It is the business of the advocate to state the whole case. Let the question be fairly stated.

State
  1. The circumstances or condition of a being or thing at any given time.

    State is a term nearly synonymous with "mode," but of a meaning more extensive, and is not exclusively limited to the mutable and contingent. Sir W. Hamilton.

    Declare the past and present state of things. Dryden.

    Keep the state of the question in your eye. Boyle.

  2. Stately.

    [Obs.] Spenser.
  3. To set] to settle; to establish.

    [R.]

    I myself, though meanest stated,
    And in court now almost hated.
    Wither.

    Who calls the council, states the certain day. Pope.

  4. A statement] also, a document containing a statement.

    [R.] Sir W. Scott.
  5. Rank; condition; quality; as, the state of honor.

    Thy honor, state, and seat is due to me. Shak.

  6. Belonging to the state, or body politic; public.
  7. To express the particulars of; to set down in detail or in gross; to represent fully in words; to narrate; to recite; as, to state the facts of a case, one's opinion, etc.

    To state it. To assume state or dignity. [Obs.] "Rarely dressed up, and taught to state it." Beau. *** Fl.

  8. Condition of prosperity or grandeur; wealthy or prosperous circumstances; social importance.

    She instructed him how he should keep state, and yet with a modest sense of his misfortunes. Bacon.

    Can this imperious lord forget to reign,
    Quit all his state, descend, and serve again?
    Pope.

  9. Appearance of grandeur or dignity; pomp.

    Where least og state there most of love is shown. Dryden.

  10. A chair with a canopy above it, often standing on a dais; a seat of dignity; also, the canopy itself.

    [Obs.]

    His high throne, . . . under state
    Of richest texture spread.
    Milton.

    When he went to court, he used to kick away the state, and sit down by his prince cheek by jowl. Swift.

  11. Estate, possession.

    [Obs.] Daniel.

    Your state, my lord, again in yours. Massinger.

  12. A person of high rank.

    [Obs.] Latimer.
  13. Any body of men united by profession, or constituting a community of a particular character; as, the civil and ecclesiastical states, or the lords spiritual and temporal and the commons, in Great Britain. Cf. Estate, n., 6.
  14. The principal persons in a government.

    The bold design
    Pleased highly those infernal states.
    Milton.

  15. The bodies that constitute the legislature of a country; as, the States-general of Holland.
  16. A form of government which is not monarchial, as a republic.

    [Obs.]

    Well monarchies may own religion's name,
    But states are atheists in their very fame.
    Dryden.

  17. A political body, or body politic; the whole body of people who are united one government, whatever may be the form of the government; a nation.

    Municipal law is a rule of conduct prescribed by the supreme power in a state. Blackstone.

    The Puritans in the reign of Mary, driven from their homes, sought an asylum in Geneva, where they found a state without a king, and a church without a bishop. R. Choate.

  18. In the United States, one of the commonwealth, or bodies politic, the people of which make up the body of the nation, and which, under the national constitution, stands in certain specified relations with the national government, and are invested, as commonwealth, with full power in their several spheres over all matters not expressly inhibited.

    * The term State, in its technical sense, is used in distinction from the federal system, i. e., the government of the United States.

  19. Highest and stationary condition, as that of maturity between growth and decline, or as that of crisis between the increase and the abating of a disease; height; acme.

    [Obs.]

    * When state is joined with another word, or used adjectively, it denotes public, or what belongs to the community or body politic, or to the government; also, what belongs to the States severally in the American Union; as, state affairs; state policy; State laws of Iowa.

    Nascent state. (Chem.) See under Nascent. -- Secretary of state. See Secretary, n., 3. -- State bargea royal barge, or a barge belonging to a government. -- State bed, an elaborately carved or decorated bed. -- State carriage, a highly decorated carriage for officials going in state, or taking part in public processions. -- State paper, an official paper relating to the interests or government of a state. Jay. -- State prison, a public prison or penitentiary; -- called also State's prison. -- State prisoner, one is confinement, or under arrest, for a political offense. -- State rights, or States' rights, the rights of the several independent States, as distinguished from the rights of the Federal government. It has been a question as to what rights have been vested in the general government. [U.S.] -- State's evidence. See Probator, 2, and under Evidence. -- State sword, a sword used on state occasions, being borne before a sovereign by an attendant of high rank. -- State trial, a trial of a person for a political offense. -- States of the Church. See under Ecclesiastical.

    Syn. -- State, Situation, Condition. State is the generic term, and denotes in general the mode in which a thing stands or exists. The situation of a thing is its state in reference to external objects and influences; its condition is its internal state, or what it is in itself considered. Our situation is good or bad as outward things bear favorably or unfavorably upon us; our condition is good or bad according to the state we are actually in as respects our persons, families, property, and other things which comprise our sources of enjoyment.

    I do not, brother,
    Infer as if I thought my sister's state
    Secure without all doubt or controversy.
    Milton.

    We hoped to enjoy with ease what, in our situation, might be called the luxuries of life. Cock.

    And, O, what man's condition can be worse
    Than his whom plenty starves and blessings curse?
    Cowley.

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State

STATE, noun [Latin , to stand, to be fixed.]

1. Condition; the circumstances of a being or thing at any given time. These circumstances may be internal, constitutional or peculiar to the being, or they may have relation to other beings. We say, the body is in a sound state or it is in a weak state; or it has just recovered from a feeble state The state of his health is good. The state of his mind is favorable for study. So we say, the state of public affairs calls for the exercise of talents and wisdom. In regard to foreign nations, our affairs are in a good state So we say, single state and married state

Declare the past and present state of things.

2. Modification of any thing.

Keep the state of the question in your eye.

3. Crisis; stationary point; highth; point from which the next movement is regression.

Tumors have their several degrees and times, as beginning, augment, state and declination. [Not in use.]

4. Estate; possession. [See Estate.]

5. A political body, or body politic; the whole body of people united under one government, whatever may be the form of the government.

Municipal law is a rule of conduct prescribed by the supreme power in a state

More usually the word signifies a political body governed by representatives; a commonwealth; as the States of Greece; the States of America. In this sense, state has sometimes more immediate reference to the government, sometimes to the people or community. Thus when we say, the state has made provision for the paupers, the word has reference to the government or legislature; but when we say, the state is taxed to support paupers, the word refers to the whole people or community.

6. A body of men united by profession, or constituting a community of a particular character; as the civil and ecclesiastical states in Great Britain. But these are sometimes distinguished by the terms church and state In this case, state signifies the civil community or government only.

7. Rank; condition; quality; as the state of honor.

8. Pomp; appearance of greatness.

In state the monarchs marchd.

Where least of state there most of love is shown.

9. Dignity; grandeur.

She instructed him how he should keep state yet with a modest sense of his misfortunes.

10. A seat of dignity.

This chair shall be my state

11. A canopy; a covering of dignity.

His high throne, under state of richest texture spread-- [Unusual.]

12. A person of high rank. [Not in use.]

13. The principal persons in a government.

The bold design pleasd highly those infernal states.

14. The bodies that constitute the legislature of a country; as the states general.

15. Joined with another word, it denotes public, or what belongs to the community or body politic; as state affairs; state policy.

STATE, verb transitive

1. To set; to settle. [See Stated.]

2. To express the particulars of any thing verbally; to represent fully in words; to narrate; to recite. The witnesses stated all the circumstances of the transaction. They are enjoined to state all the particulars. It is the business of the advocate to state the whole case. Let the question be fairly stated.

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STUDY OF THE KJV OLD AND NEW TESTAMENTS IN ORIGINAL ENGLISH TRANSLATION

— Michael J. (Blackstone, MA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

coiner

COINER, n.

1. One who stamps coin; a minter; a maker of money.

2. A counterfeiter of the legal coin; a maker of base money.

3. An inventor or maker, as of words.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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