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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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star

STAR, n.

1. An apparently small luminous body in the heavens, that appears in the night, or when its light is not obscured by clouds or lost in the brighter effulgence of the sun. Stars are fixed or planetary. The fixed stars are known by their perpetual twinkling, and by their being always in the same position in relation to each other. The planets do not twinkle, and they revolve about the sun. The stars are worlds, and their immense numbers exhibit the astonishing extent of creation and of divine power.

2. The pole-star. [A particular application, not in use.]

3. In astrology, a configuration of the planets, supposed to influence fortune. Hence the expression, You may thank your stars for such and such an event.

A pair of star-crossd lovers.

4. The figure of a star; a radiated mark in writing or printing; an asterisk; thus*; used as a reference to a note in the margin, or to fill a blank in writing or printing where letters are omitted.

5. In Scripture, Christ is called the bright and morning star, the star that ushers in the light of an eternal day to his people. Revelations 22. Ministers are also called stars in Christs right hand, as, being supported and directed by Christ, they convey light and knowledge to the followers of Christ. Revelations 1. The twelve stars which form the crown of the church, are the twelve apostles. Revelations 12.

6. The figure of a star; a badge of rank; as stars and garters.

The pole-star, a bright star in the tail of Ursa minor, so called from its being very near the north pole.

Star of Bethlehem, a flower and plant of the genus Ornithogalum. There is also the star of Alexandria, and of Naples, and of Constantinople, of the same genus.

STAR, v.t. To set or adorn with stars or bright radiating bodies; to bespangle; as a robe starred with gems.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [star]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

STAR, n.

1. An apparently small luminous body in the heavens, that appears in the night, or when its light is not obscured by clouds or lost in the brighter effulgence of the sun. Stars are fixed or planetary. The fixed stars are known by their perpetual twinkling, and by their being always in the same position in relation to each other. The planets do not twinkle, and they revolve about the sun. The stars are worlds, and their immense numbers exhibit the astonishing extent of creation and of divine power.

2. The pole-star. [A particular application, not in use.]

3. In astrology, a configuration of the planets, supposed to influence fortune. Hence the expression, You may thank your stars for such and such an event.

A pair of star-crossd lovers.

4. The figure of a star; a radiated mark in writing or printing; an asterisk; thus*; used as a reference to a note in the margin, or to fill a blank in writing or printing where letters are omitted.

5. In Scripture, Christ is called the bright and morning star, the star that ushers in the light of an eternal day to his people. Revelations 22. Ministers are also called stars in Christs right hand, as, being supported and directed by Christ, they convey light and knowledge to the followers of Christ. Revelations 1. The twelve stars which form the crown of the church, are the twelve apostles. Revelations 12.

6. The figure of a star; a badge of rank; as stars and garters.

The pole-star, a bright star in the tail of Ursa minor, so called from its being very near the north pole.

Star of Bethlehem, a flower and plant of the genus Ornithogalum. There is also the star of Alexandria, and of Naples, and of Constantinople, of the same genus.

STAR, v.t. To set or adorn with stars or bright radiating bodies; to bespangle; as a robe starred with gems.


STAR, n. [Sax. steorra; Dan. and Sw. stierna; G. stern; D. star; Arm. and Corn. steren; Basque, zarra; Gr. αστηρ; Sans. tara; Bengal. stara; Pehlavi, setaram; Pers. setareh or stara; W. seren.]

  1. An apparently small luminous body in the heavens, that appears in the night, or when its light is not obscured by clouds or lost in the brighter effulgence of the sun. Stars are fixed or planetary. The fixed stars are known by their perpetual twinkling, and by their being always in the same position in relation to each other. The planets do not twinkle, and they revolve about the sun. The stars are probably worlds, and their immense numbers exhibit the astonishing extent of creation and of divine power.
  2. The pole-star. [A particular application, not in use.] – Shak.
  3. In astrology, a configuration of the planets, supposed to influence fortune. Hence the expression, “You may thank your stars for such and such an event.” A pair of star-cross'd lovers. – Shak.
  4. The figure of a star; a radiated mark in writing or printing; an asterisk; thus *; used as a reference to a note in the margin, or to fill a blank in writing or printing where letters are omitted.
  5. In Scripture, Christ is called the bright and morning star, the star that ushers in the light of an eternal day to his people. – Rev. xxii. Ministers are also called stars in Christ's right hand, as, being supported and directed by Christ, they convey light and knowledge to the followers of Christ. – Rev. i. The twelve stars which form the crown of the church, are the twelve apostles. – Rev. xii.
  6. The figure of a star; a badge of rank; as, stars and garters.
  7. A distinguished and brilliant theatrical performer. The pole-star, a bright star in the tail of Ursa minor, so called from its being very near the north pole. Star of Bethlehem, a flower and plant of the genus Ornithogalum. There is also the star of Alexandria, and of Naples, and of Constantinople, of the same genus. – Cyc. Lee.

STAR, v.t.

To set or adorn with stars or bright radiating bodies; to bespangle; as, a robe starred with gems.


Star
  1. One of the innumerable luminous bodies seen in the heavens; any heavenly body other than the sun, moon, comets, and nebulæ.

    His eyen twinkled in his head aright,
    As do the stars in the frosty night.
    Chaucer.

    * The stars are distinguished as planets, and fixed stars. See Planet, Fixed stars under Fixed, and Magnitude of a star under Magnitude.

  2. To set or adorn with stars, or bright, radiating bodies] to bespangle; as, a robe starred with gems.

    "A sable curtain starred with gold." Young.
  3. To be bright, or attract attention, as a star; to shine like a star; to be brilliant or prominent; to play a part as a theatrical star.

    W. Irving.
  4. The polestar; the north star.

    Shak.
  5. A planet supposed to influence one's destiny; (usually pl.) a configuration of the planets, supposed to influence fortune.

    O malignant and ill-brooding stars. Shak.

    Blesses his stars, and thinks it luxury. Addison.

  6. That which resembles the figure of a star, as an ornament worn on the breast to indicate rank or honor.

    On whom . . .
    Lavish Honor showered all her stars.
    Tennyson.

  7. Specifically, a radiated mark in writing or printing; an asterisk [thus, *]; -- used as a reference to a note, or to fill a blank where something is omitted, etc.
  8. A composition of combustible matter used in the heading of rockets, in mines, etc., which, exploding in the air, presents a starlike appearance.
  9. A person of brilliant and attractive qualities, especially on public occasions, as a distinguished orator, a leading theatrical performer, etc.

    * Star is used in the formation of compound words generally of obvious signification: as, star-aspiring, star-bespangled, star-bestudded, star-blasting, star-bright, star-crowned, star-directed, star-eyed, star-headed, star-paved, star- roofed; star-sprinkled, star-wreathed.

    Blazing star, Double star, Multiple star, Shooting star, etc. See under Blazing, Double, etc. -- Nebulous star (Astron.), a small well- defined circular nebula, having a bright nucleus at its center like a star. -- Star anise (Bot.), any plant of the genus Illicium; -- so called from its star-shaped capsules. -- Star apple (Bot.), a tropical American tree (Chrysophyllum Cainito), having a milky juice and oblong leaves with a silky-golden pubescence beneath. It bears an applelike fruit, the carpels of which present a starlike figure when cut across. The name is extended to the whole genus of about sixty species, and the natural order (Sapotaceæ) to which it belongs is called the Star-apple family. -- Star conner, one who cons, or studies, the stars; an astronomer or an astrologer. Gascoigne. -- Star coral (Zoöl.), any one of numerous species of stony corals belonging to Astræa, Orbicella, and allied genera, in which the calicles are round or polygonal and contain conspicuous radiating septa. -- Star cucumber. (Bot.) See under Cucumber. -- Star flower. (Bot.) (a) A plant of the genus Ornithogalum; star-of-Bethlehem. (b) See Starwort (b). (c) An American plant of the genus Trientalis (Trientalis Americana). Gray. -- Star fort (Fort.), a fort surrounded on the exterior with projecting angles; -- whence the name. -- Star gauge (Ordnance), a long rod, with adjustable points projecting radially at its end, for measuring the size of different parts of the bore of a gun. -- Star grass. (Bot.) (a) A small grasslike plant (Hypoxis erecta) having star-shaped yellow flowers. (b) The colicroot. See Colicroot. -- Star hyacinth (Bot.), a bulbous plant of the genus Scilla (S. autumnalis); -- called also star-headed hyacinth. -- Star jelly (Bot.), any one of several gelatinous plants (Nostoc commune, N. edule, etc.). See Nostoc. -- Star lizard. (Zoöl.) Same as Stellion. -- Star- of-Bethlehem (Bot.), a bulbous liliaceous plant (Ornithogalum umbellatum) having a small white starlike flower. -- Star-of-the-earth (Bot.), a plant of the genus Plantago (P. coronopus), growing upon the seashore. -- Star polygon (Geom.), a polygon whose sides cut each other so as to form a star-shaped figure. -- Stars and Stripes, a popular name for the flag of the United States, which consists of thirteen horizontal stripes, alternately red and white, and a union having, in a blue field, white stars to represent the several States, one for each.

    With the old flag, the true American flag, the Eagle, and the Stars and Stripes, waving over the chamber in which we sit. D. Webster.

    -- Star showers. See Shooting star, under Shooting. -- Star thistle (Bot.), an annual composite plant (Centaurea solstitialis) having the involucre armed with radiating spines. -- Star wheel (Mach.), a star-shaped disk, used as a kind of ratchet wheel, in repeating watches and the feed motions of some machines. -- Star worm (Zoöl.), a gephyrean. -- Temporary star (Astron.), a star which appears suddenly, shines for a period, and then nearly or quite disappears. These stars are supposed by some astronometers to be variable stars of long and undetermined periods. -- Variable star (Astron.), a star whose brilliancy varies periodically, generally with regularity, but sometimes irregularly; -- called periodical star when its changes occur at fixed periods. -- Water star grass (Bot.), an aquatic plant (Schollera graminea) with small yellow starlike blossoms.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Star

STAR, noun

1. An apparently small luminous body in the heavens, that appears in the night, or when its light is not obscured by clouds or lost in the brighter effulgence of the sun. Stars are fixed or planetary. The fixed stars are known by their perpetual twinkling, and by their being always in the same position in relation to each other. The planets do not twinkle, and they revolve about the sun. The stars are worlds, and their immense numbers exhibit the astonishing extent of creation and of divine power.

2. The pole-star. [A particular application, not in use.]

3. In astrology, a configuration of the planets, supposed to influence fortune. Hence the expression, You may thank your stars for such and such an event.

A pair of star-crossd lovers.

4. The figure of a star; a radiated mark in writing or printing; an asterisk; thus*; used as a reference to a note in the margin, or to fill a blank in writing or printing where letters are omitted.

5. In Scripture, Christ is called the bright and morning star the star that ushers in the light of an eternal day to his people. Revelations 22. Ministers are also called stars in Christs right hand, as, being supported and directed by Christ, they convey light and knowledge to the followers of Christ. Revelations 1. The twelve stars which form the crown of the church, are the twelve apostles. Revelations 12.

6. The figure of a star; a badge of rank; as stars and garters.

The pole-star, a bright star in the tail of Ursa minor, so called from its being very near the north pole.

STAR of Bethlehem, a flower and plant of the genus Ornithogalum. There is also the star of Alexandria, and of Naples, and of Constantinople, of the same genus.

STAR, verb transitive To set or adorn with stars or bright radiating bodies; to bespangle; as a robe starred with gems.

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For context of historical documents such as the Declaration, Constitution, Federalist and other critical writings of our Founders.

— 02.05.2004 (Casa Grande, AZ)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

cognominal

COGNOMINAL, a.

1. Pertaining to a surname.

2. Having the same name.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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