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Thursday - August 22, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [split]

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split

SPLIT, v.t. pret. and pp. split. [G. See Spalt.]

1. To divide longitudinally or lengthwise; to separate a thing from end to end by force; to rive; to cleave; as, to split a piece of timber; to split a board. It differs from crack. To crack is to open or partially separate; to split is to separate entirely.

2. To rend; to tear asunder by violence; to burst; as, to split a rock or a sail.

Cold winter splits the rocks in twain.

3. To divide; to part; as, to split a hair. The phrases to split the heart, to split a ray of light, are now inelegant and obsolete, especially the former. The phrase, to split the earth, is not strictly correct.

4. To dash and break on a rock; as, a ship stranded and split.

5. To divide; to break into discord; as a people split into parties.

6. To strain and pain with laughter; as, to split the sides.

SPLIT, v.i.

1. To burst; to part asunder; to suffer disruption; as, vessels split by the freezing of water in them. Glass vessels often split when heated too suddenly.

2. To burst with laughter.

Each had a gravity would make you split.

3. To be broken; to be dashed to pieces. We were driven upon a rock, and the ship immediately split.

To split on a rock, to fail; to err fatally; to have the hopes and designs frustrated.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [split]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SPLIT, v.t. pret. and pp. split. [G. See Spalt.]

1. To divide longitudinally or lengthwise; to separate a thing from end to end by force; to rive; to cleave; as, to split a piece of timber; to split a board. It differs from crack. To crack is to open or partially separate; to split is to separate entirely.

2. To rend; to tear asunder by violence; to burst; as, to split a rock or a sail.

Cold winter splits the rocks in twain.

3. To divide; to part; as, to split a hair. The phrases to split the heart, to split a ray of light, are now inelegant and obsolete, especially the former. The phrase, to split the earth, is not strictly correct.

4. To dash and break on a rock; as, a ship stranded and split.

5. To divide; to break into discord; as a people split into parties.

6. To strain and pain with laughter; as, to split the sides.

SPLIT, v.i.

1. To burst; to part asunder; to suffer disruption; as, vessels split by the freezing of water in them. Glass vessels often split when heated too suddenly.

2. To burst with laughter.

Each had a gravity would make you split.

3. To be broken; to be dashed to pieces. We were driven upon a rock, and the ship immediately split.

To split on a rock, to fail; to err fatally; to have the hopes and designs frustrated.

SPLIT, v.i.

  1. To burst; to part asunder; to suffer disruption; as, vessels split by the freezing of water in them. Glass vessels often split when heated too suddenly.
  2. To burst with laughter. Each had a gravity would make you split. – Pope.
  3. To be broken; to be dashed to pieces. We were driven upon a rock, and the ship immediately split. – Swift. To split on a rock, to fail; to err fatally; to have the hopes and designs frustrated. – Spectator.

SPLIT, v.t. [pret. and pp. split. D. splitten; Dan. splitter; G. splittern or spleissen; Eth. ፈለጠ falt, to separate, to divide, the same verb which in other Shemitic languages, Heb. Ch. and Syr. פלט, signifies to escape. See Spalt.]

  1. To divide longitudinally or lengthwise; to separate a thing from end to end by force; to rive; to cleave; as, to split a piece of timber; to split a board. It differs from crack. To crack is to open or partially separate; to split is to separate entirely.
  2. To rend; to tear asunder by violence; to burst; as, to split a rock or a sail. Cold winter splits the rocks in twain. – Dryden.
  3. To divide; to part; as, to split a hair. The phrases, to split the heart, to split a ray of light, are now inelegant and obsolete, especially the former. The phrase, to split the earth, is not strictly correct.
  4. To dash and break on a rock; as, a ship stranded and split. – Mar. Dict.
  5. To divide; to break into discord; as, a people split into parties.
  6. To strain and pain with laughter; as, to split the sides.

Split
  1. To divide lengthwise; to separate from end to end, esp. by force; to divide in the direction of the grain layers; to rive; to cleave; as, to split a piece of timber or a board; to split a gem; to split a sheepskin.

    Cold winter split the rocks in twain. Dryden.

  2. To part asunder; to be rent; to burst; as, vessels split by the freezing of water in them.
  3. A breach or separation, as in a political party; a division.

    [Colloq.]
  4. Divided; cleft.
  5. Any of the three or four strips into which osiers are commonly cleft for certain kinds of work; -- usually in pl.

    (b) (Weaving)
  6. Divided so as to be done or executed part at one time or price and part at another time or price; -- said of an order, sale, etc.

    (b)
  7. To burst; to rupture; to rend; to tear asunder.

    A huge vessel of exceeding hard marble split asunder by congealed water. Boyle.

  8. To be broken; to be dashed to pieces.

    The ship splits on the rock. Shak.

  9. A piece that is split off, or made thin, by splitting; a splinter; a fragment.
  10. Divided deeply; cleft.

    Split pease, hulled pease split for making soup, etc. -- Split pin (Mach.), a pin with one end split so that it may be spread open to secure it in its place. -- Split pulley, a parting pulley. See under Pulley. -- Split ring, a ring with overlapped or interlocked ends which may be sprung apart so that objects, as keys, may be strung upon the ring or removed from it. -- Split ticket, a ballot containing the names of only a portion of the candidates regularly nominated by one party, other names being substituted for those omitted. [U.S.]

  11. Short for Split shot or stroke.
  12. To divide or break up into parts or divisions, as by discord; to separate into parts or parties, as a political party; to disunite.

    [Colloq.] South.
  13. To separate into parties or factions.

    [Colloq.]
  14. Specif (Leather Manuf.), one of the sections of a skin made by dividing it into two or more thicknesses.
  15. The feat of going down to the floor so that the legs extend in a straight line, either with one on each side or with one in front and the other behind.

    [Cant or Slang]
  16. To divide or separate into components; -- often used with up; as, to split up sugar into alcohol and carbonic acid.

    To split hairs, to make distinctions of useless nicety.

  17. To burst with laughter.

    [Colloq.]

    Each had a gravity would make you split. Pope.

  18. A division of a stake happening when two cards of the kind on which the stake is laid are dealt in the same turn.
  19. A small bottle (containing about half a pint) of some drink; -- so called as containing half the quantity of the customary smaller commercial size of bottle; also, a drink of half the usual quantity; a half glass.

    [Cant or Slang]
  20. To divulge a secret; to betray confidence; to peach.

    [Slang] Thackeray.
  21. the substitution of more than one share of a corporation's stock for one share. The market price of the stock usually drops in proportion to the increase in outstanding shares of stock. The split may be in any ratio, as a two-for-one split; a three-for-two split.
  22. to divide one hand of blackjack into two hands, allowed when the first two cards dealt to a player have the same value.

    To split on a rock, to err fatally; to have the hopes and designs frustrated.

  23. the division by a player of one hand of blackjack into two hands, allowed when the first two cards dealt to a player have the same value; the player is usually obliged to increase the amount wagered by placing a sum equal to the original bet on the new hand thus created.
1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Split

SPLIT, verb transitive preterit tense and participle passive split [G. See Spalt.]

1. To divide longitudinally or lengthwise; to separate a thing from end to end by force; to rive; to cleave; as, to split a piece of timber; to split a board. It differs from crack. To crack is to open or partially separate; to split is to separate entirely.

2. To rend; to tear asunder by violence; to burst; as, to split a rock or a sail.

Cold winter splits the rocks in twain.

3. To divide; to part; as, to split a hair. The phrases to split the heart, to split a ray of light, are now inelegant and obsolete, especially the former. The phrase, to split the earth, is not strictly correct.

4. To dash and break on a rock; as, a ship stranded and split

5. To divide; to break into discord; as a people split into parties.

6. To strain and pain with laughter; as, to split the sides.

SPLIT, verb intransitive

1. To burst; to part asunder; to suffer disruption; as, vessels split by the freezing of water in them. Glass vessels often split when heated too suddenly.

2. To burst with laughter.

Each had a gravity would make you split

3. To be broken; to be dashed to pieces. We were driven upon a rock, and the ship immediately split

To split on a rock, to fail; to err fatally; to have the hopes and designs frustrated.

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I am a Christian and it has gotten harder and harder to look up something and get the true meaning of what my language means.

— Laura (Bayfield, CO)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

misnaming

MISNA'MING, ppr. Calling by a wrong name.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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