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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [spare]

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spare

SPARE, v.t. [It seems to be from the same root as L. parco.]

1. To use frugally; not to be profuse; not to waste. Thou thy Father's thunder did'st not spare/

2. To save or withhold from any particular use or occupation. He has no bread to spare, that is, to withhold from his necessary uses. All the time he could spare from the necessary cares of his weighty charge, he bestowed on prayer and serving of God.

3. To part with without much inconvenience; to do without. I could have better spar'd a better man. Nor can we spare you long-

4. To omit; to forbear. We might have spared this toil and expense; Be pleas'd your politics to spare.

5. To use tenderly; to treat with pity and forbearance; to forbear to afflict, punish or destroy. Spare us, good Lord. dim sadness did not spare celestial visages. But man alone can whom be conquers spare.

6. Not to take when in one's power; to forbear to destroy; as, to spare the life of a prisoner.

7. To grant; to allow; to indulge. Where anger Jove did never spare one breath of kind and temp'rate air.

8. TO forbear to inflict of impose. Spare my sight the pain of seeing what a world of tears it cost you.

SPARE, v.i.

1. TO live frugally; to be parsimonious. Who at some times spend, as other spare, divided between carelessness and care.

2. To forbear; to be scrupulous. To pluck and cat my fill I spar'd not.

3. To be frugal; not to be profuse.

4. To use mercy or forbearance; to forgive to be tender. The king was sparing and compassionate towards hid subjects.

SPARE, a.

1. Seanty; parsimonious; not abundant; as a spare diet. He was spare but discreet of speech. [We more generally use, in the latter application, sparing; as, he was sparing of words.]

2. That can be dispensed with; not wanted; superfluous. I have no spare time on my hands. If that no spare clothes he had to give.

3. Lean; wanting flesh; meager; thin. O give me your spare men and spare me the great ones.

4. Slow. [Not in use.]

SPARE, n. Parsimony; frugal use. [Not in use.]




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [spare]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SPARE, v.t. [It seems to be from the same root as L. parco.]

1. To use frugally; not to be profuse; not to waste. Thou thy Father's thunder did'st not spare/

2. To save or withhold from any particular use or occupation. He has no bread to spare, that is, to withhold from his necessary uses. All the time he could spare from the necessary cares of his weighty charge, he bestowed on prayer and serving of God.

3. To part with without much inconvenience; to do without. I could have better spar'd a better man. Nor can we spare you long-

4. To omit; to forbear. We might have spared this toil and expense; Be pleas'd your politics to spare.

5. To use tenderly; to treat with pity and forbearance; to forbear to afflict, punish or destroy. Spare us, good Lord. dim sadness did not spare celestial visages. But man alone can whom be conquers spare.

6. Not to take when in one's power; to forbear to destroy; as, to spare the life of a prisoner.

7. To grant; to allow; to indulge. Where anger Jove did never spare one breath of kind and temp'rate air.

8. TO forbear to inflict of impose. Spare my sight the pain of seeing what a world of tears it cost you.

SPARE, v.i.

1. TO live frugally; to be parsimonious. Who at some times spend, as other spare, divided between carelessness and care.

2. To forbear; to be scrupulous. To pluck and cat my fill I spar'd not.

3. To be frugal; not to be profuse.

4. To use mercy or forbearance; to forgive to be tender. The king was sparing and compassionate towards hid subjects.

SPARE, a.

1. Seanty; parsimonious; not abundant; as a spare diet. He was spare but discreet of speech. [We more generally use, in the latter application, sparing; as, he was sparing of words.]

2. That can be dispensed with; not wanted; superfluous. I have no spare time on my hands. If that no spare clothes he had to give.

3. Lean; wanting flesh; meager; thin. O give me your spare men and spare me the great ones.

4. Slow. [Not in use.]

SPARE, n. Parsimony; frugal use. [Not in use.]


SPARE, a. [Sax. spær.]

  1. Scanty; parsimonious; not abundant; as, a spare diet. He was spare but discreet of speech. – Carew. [We more generally use, in the latter application, sparing; as, he was sparing of words.]
  2. That can be dispensed with; not wanted; superfluous. I have no spare time on my hands. If that no spare clothes he had to give. – Spenser.
  3. Lean; wanting flesh; meager; thin. O give me your spare men, and spare me the great ones. – Shak.
  4. Slow. [Not in use or local.] – Grose.

SPARE, n.

Parsimony; frugal use. [Not in use.] – Bacon.


SPARE, v.i.

  1. To live frugally; to be parsimonious. Who at some times spend, at others spare; / Divided between carelessness and care. – Pope.
  2. To forbear; to be scrupulous. To pluck and eat my fill I spar'd not. – Milton.
  3. To be frugal; not to be profuse.
  4. To use mercy or forbearance; to forgive; to be tender. The king was sparing and compassionate toward his subjects. – Bacon.

SPARE, v.t. [Sax. sparian; D. spaaren; G. sparen; Dan. sparer; Sw. spara; Fr. eparagner. It seems to be from the same root as L. parco; It. sparagnare.]

  1. To use frugally; not to be profuse; not to waste. Thou thy Father's thunder didst not spare. – Milton.
  2. To save or withhold from any particular use or occupation. He has no bread to spare, that is, to withhold from his necessary uses. All the time he could spare from the necessary cares of his weighty charge, he bestowed on prayer and serving God. – Knolles.
  3. To part with without much inconvenience; to do without. I could have better spar'd a better man. – Shak. Nor can we spare you long. – Dryden.
  4. To omit; to forbear. We might have spared this toil and expense. Be pleas'd your politics to spare. – Dryden.
  5. To use tenderly; to treat with pity and forbearance; to forbear to afflict, punish or destroy. Spare us, good Lord. – Com. Prayer. Dim sadness did not spare / Celestial visages. – Milton. But man alone can whom He conquers spare. – Waller.
  6. Not to take when in one's power; to forbear to destroy; as, to spare the life of a prisoner.
  7. To grant; to allow; to indulge. Where angry Jove did never spare / One breath of kind and delicate air. – Roscommon.
  8. To forbear to inflict or impose. Spare my sight the pain / Of seeing what a world of tears it cost you. – Dryden.

Spare
  1. To use frugally or stintingly, as that which is scarce or valuable] to retain or keep unused; to save.

    "No cost would he spare." Chaucer.

    [Thou] thy Father's dreadful thunder didst not spare. Milton.

    He that hath knowledge, spareth his words. Prov. xvii. 27.

  2. To be frugal; not to be profuse; to live frugally; to be parsimonious.

    I, who at some times spend, at others spare,
    Divided between carelessness and care.
    Pope.

  3. Scanty; not abundant or plentiful; as, a spare diet.
  4. The act of sparing; moderation; restraint.

    [Obs.]

    Killing for sacrifice, without any spare. Holland.

  5. To keep to one's self; to forbear to impart or give.

    Be pleased your plitics to spare. Dryden.

    Spare my sight the pain
    Of seeing what a world of tears it costs you.
    Dryden.

  6. To refrain from inflicting harm; to use mercy or forbearance.

    He will not spare in the day of vengeance. Prov. vi. 34.

  7. Sparing; frugal; parsimonious; chary.

    He was spare, but discreet of speech. Carew.

  8. Parsimony; frugal use.

    [Obs.] Bacon.

    Poured out their plenty without spite or spare. Spenser.

  9. To preserve from danger or punishment; to forbear to punish, injure, or harm; to show mercy to.

    Spare us, good Lord. Book of Common Prayer.

    Dim sadness did not spare
    That time celestial visages.
    Milton.

    Man alone can whom he conquers spare. Waller.

  10. To desist; to stop; to refrain.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.
  11. Being over and above what is necessary, or what must be used or reserved; not wanted, or not used; superfluous; as, I have no spare time.

    If that no spare clothes he had to give. Spenser.

  12. An opening in a petticoat or gown; a placket.

    [Obs.]
  13. To save or gain, as by frugality; to reserve, as from some occupation, use, or duty.

    All the time he could spare from the necessary cares of his weighty charge, he (?)estowed on . . . serving of God. Knolles.

  14. Held in reserve, to be used in an emergency; as, a spare anchor; a spare bed or room.
  15. That which has not been used or expended.
  16. To deprive one's self of, as by being frugal; to do without; to dispense with; to give up; to part with.

    Where angry Jove did never spare
    One breath of kind and temperate air.
    Roscommon.

    I could have better spared a better man. Shak.

    To spare one's self. (a) To act with reserve. [Obs.]

    Her thought that a lady should her spare. Chaucer.

    (b) To save one's self labor, punishment, or blame.

  17. Lean; wanting flesh; meager; thin; gaunt.

    O, give me the spare men, and spare me the great ones. Shak.

  18. The right of bowling again at a full set of pins, after having knocked all the pins down in less than three bowls. If all the pins are knocked down in one bowl it is a double spare; in two bowls, a single spare.
  19. Slow.

    [Obs. or prov. Eng.] Grose.
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Spare

SPARE, verb transitive [It seems to be from the same root as Latin parco.]

1. To use frugally; not to be profuse; not to waste. Thou thy Father's thunder did'st not spare/

2. To save or withhold from any particular use or occupation. He has no bread to spare that is, to withhold from his necessary uses. All the time he could spare from the necessary cares of his weighty charge, he bestowed on prayer and serving of God.

3. To part with without much inconvenience; to do without. I could have better spar'd a better man. Nor can we spare you long-

4. To omit; to forbear. We might have spared this toil and expense; Be pleas'd your politics to spare

5. To use tenderly; to treat with pity and forbearance; to forbear to afflict, punish or destroy. spare us, good Lord. dim sadness did not spare celestial visages. But man alone can whom be conquers spare

6. Not to take when in one's power; to forbear to destroy; as, to spare the life of a prisoner.

7. To grant; to allow; to indulge. Where anger Jove did never spare one breath of kind and temp'rate air.

8. TO forbear to inflict of impose. spare my sight the pain of seeing what a world of tears it cost you.

SPARE, verb intransitive

1. TO live frugally; to be parsimonious. Who at some times spend, as other spare divided between carelessness and care.

2. To forbear; to be scrupulous. To pluck and cat my fill I spar'd not.

3. To be frugal; not to be profuse.

4. To use mercy or forbearance; to forgive to be tender. The king was sparing and compassionate towards hid subjects.

SPARE, adjective

1. Seanty; parsimonious; not abundant; as a spare diet. He was spare but discreet of speech. [We more generally use, in the latter application, sparing; as, he was sparing of words.]

2. That can be dispensed with; not wanted; superfluous. I have no spare time on my hands. If that no spare clothes he had to give.

3. Lean; wanting flesh; meager; thin. O give me your spare men and spare me the great ones.

4. Slow. [Not in use.]

SPARE, noun Parsimony; frugal use. [Not in use.]

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

staves

STAVES, plu. of staff, when applied to a stick, is pronounced with a as in ask, the Italian sound.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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