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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [sort]

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sort

SORT, n. [L. sors, lot, chance, state, way, sort. This word is form the root of L. sortior; the radical sense of which is to start or shoot, to throw or to fall, to come suddenly. Hence sore is lot, chance, that which comes or falls. This sense of sort is probably derivative, signifying that which is thrown out, separated or selected.]

1. A kind or species; any number or collection of individual persons or thing characterized by the same or like qualities; as a sort of men; a sort of horses; a sort of trees; a sort of poems or writings. Sort is not a technical word, and therefore is used with less precision or more latitude than genus or species in the sciences.

2. Manner; form of being or acting. Flowers, in such sort worn, can neither be smelt not seen well by those that wear them. To Adam in what sort shall I appear?

3. Class or order; as men of the wiser sort, or the better sort; all sorts of people. [See Def. 1.]

4. Rank; condition above the vulgar. [Not in use.]

5. A company or knot of people. [Not in use.]

6. Degree of any quality. I shall not be wholly without praise, if in some sort I have copied his style.

7. Lot.

8. A pair; a set; a suit.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [sort]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SORT, n. [L. sors, lot, chance, state, way, sort. This word is form the root of L. sortior; the radical sense of which is to start or shoot, to throw or to fall, to come suddenly. Hence sore is lot, chance, that which comes or falls. This sense of sort is probably derivative, signifying that which is thrown out, separated or selected.]

1. A kind or species; any number or collection of individual persons or thing characterized by the same or like qualities; as a sort of men; a sort of horses; a sort of trees; a sort of poems or writings. Sort is not a technical word, and therefore is used with less precision or more latitude than genus or species in the sciences.

2. Manner; form of being or acting. Flowers, in such sort worn, can neither be smelt not seen well by those that wear them. To Adam in what sort shall I appear?

3. Class or order; as men of the wiser sort, or the better sort; all sorts of people. [See Def. 1.]

4. Rank; condition above the vulgar. [Not in use.]

5. A company or knot of people. [Not in use.]

6. Degree of any quality. I shall not be wholly without praise, if in some sort I have copied his style.

7. Lot.

8. A pair; a set; a suit.

SORT, n. [Fr. sorte; It. sorta; Sp. suerte; Port. sorte; G. id.; D. soort; Sw. and Dan. sort; L. sors, lot, chance, state, way, sort. This word is from the root of Fr. sortir, It. sortire, L. sortior; the radical sense of which is to start or shoot, to throw or to fall, to come suddenly. Hence sors is lot, chance, that which comes or falls. The sense of sort is probably derivative, signifying that which is thrown out, separated or selected.]

  1. A kind or species; any number or collection of individual persons or things characterized by the same or like qualities; as, a sort of men; a sort of horses; a sort of trees; a sort of poems or writings. Sort is not a technical word, and therefore is used with less precision or more latitude than genus or species in the sciences.
  2. Manner; form of being or acting. Flowers, in such sort worn, can neither be smelt nor seen well by those that wear them. – Hooker. To Adam in what sort shall I appear? – Milton.
  3. Class or order; as, men of the wiser sort, or the better sort; all sorts of people. [See Def. 1.]
  4. Rank; condition above the vulgar. [Not in use.] – Shak.
  5. A company or knot of people. [Not in use.] – Shak. Waller.
  6. Degree of any quality. I shall not be wholly without praise, if in some sort I have copied his style. – Dryden.
  7. Lot. [Obs.] – Shak.
  8. A pair; a set; a suit.

SORT, v.i.

  1. To be joined with others of the same species. Nor do metals only sort with metals in the earth, and minerals with minerals. – Woodward.
  2. To consort; to associate. The illiberality of parents toward children, makes them base and sort with any company. – Bacon.
  3. To suit; to fit. They are happy whose natures sort with their vocations. – Bacon.
  4. To terminate; to issue; to have success. [Fr. sortir.] [Not in use.] – Bacon.
  5. To fall out. [Not in use.] – Shak.

SORT, v.t.

  1. To separate, as things having like qualities from other things, and place them in distinct classes or divisions; as, to sort cloths according to their colors; to sort wool or thread according to its fineness. Shell fish have been, by some of the ancients, compared and sorted with insects. – Bacon. Rays which differ in refrangibility, may be parted and sorted from one another. – Newton.
  2. To reduce to order from a state of confusion. [See supra.]
  3. To conjoin; to put together in distribution. The swain perceiving by her words ill sorted, / That she was wholly from herself transported. – Brown.
  4. To cull; to choose from a number; to select. That he may sort her out a worthy spouse. – Chapman.

Sort
  1. Chance; lot; destiny.

    [Obs.]

    By aventure, or sort, or cas [chance]. Chaucer.

    Let blockish Ajax draw
    The sort to fight with Hector.
    Shak.

  2. A kind or species; any number or collection of individual persons or things characterized by the same or like qualities; a class or order; as, a sort of men; a sort of horses; a sort of trees; a sort of poems.
  3. To separate, and place in distinct classes or divisions, as things having different qualities] as, to sort cloths according to their colors; to sort wool or thread according to its fineness.

    Rays which differ in refrangibility may be parted and sorted from one another. Sir I. Newton.

  4. To join or associate with others, esp. with others of the same kind or species; to agree.

    Nor do metals only sort and herd with metals in the earth, and minerals with minerals. Woodward.

    The illiberality of parents towards children makes them base, and sort with any company. Bacon.

  5. Manner; form of being or acting.

    Which for my part I covet to perform,
    In sort as through the world I did proclaim.
    Spenser.

    Flowers, in such sort worn, can neither be smelt nor seen well by those that wear them. Hooker.

    I'll deceive you in another sort. Shak.

    To Adam in what sort
    Shall I appear?
    Milton.

    I shall not be wholly without praise, if in some sort I have copied his style. Dryden.

  6. To reduce to order from a confused state.

    Hooker.
  7. To suit; to fit; to be in accord; to harmonize.

    They are happy whose natures sort with their vocations. Bacon.

    Things sort not to my will. herbert.

    I can not tell you precisely how they sorted. Sir W. Scott.

  8. Condition above the vulgar; rank.

    [Obs.] Shak.
  9. To conjoin; to put together in distribution; to class.

    Shellfish have been, by some of the ancients, compared and sorted with insects. Bacon.

    She sorts things present with things past. Sir J. Davies.

  10. A chance group; a company of persons who happen to be together; a troop; also, an assemblage of animals.

    [Obs.] "A sort of shepherds." Spenser. "A sort of steers." Spenser. "A sort of doves." Dryden. "A sort of rogues." Massinger.

    A boy, a child, and we a sort of us,
    Vowed against his voyage.
    Chapman.

  11. To choose from a number; to select; to cull.

    That he may sort out a worthy spouse. Chapman.

    I'll sort some other time to visit you. Shak.

  12. A pair; a set; a suit.

    Johnson.
  13. To conform; to adapt; to accommodate.

    [R.]

    I pray thee, sort thy heart to patience. Shak.

  14. Letters, figures, points, marks, spaces, or quadrats, belonging to a case, separately considered.

    Out of sorts (Print.), with some letters or sorts of type deficient or exhausted in the case or font; hence, colloquially, out of order; ill; vexed; disturbed. -- To run upon sorts (Print.), to use or require a greater number of some particular letters, figures, or marks than the regular proportion, as, for example, in making an index.

    Syn. -- Kind; species; rank; condition. -- Sort, Kind. Kind originally denoted things of the same family, or bound together by some natural affinity; and hence, a class. Sort signifies that which constitutes a particular lot of parcel, not implying necessarily the idea of affinity, but of mere assemblage. the two words are now used to a great extent interchangeably, though sort (perhaps from its original meaning of lot) sometimes carries with it a slight tone of disparagement or contempt, as when we say, that sort of people, that sort of language.

    As when the total kind
    Of birds, in orderly array on wing,
    Came summoned over Eden to receive
    Their names of there.
    Milton.

    None of noble sort
    Would so offend a virgin.
    Shak.

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Sort

SORT, noun [Latin sors, lot, chance, state, way, sort This word is form the root of Latin sortior; the radical sense of which is to start or shoot, to throw or to fall, to come suddenly. Hence sore is lot, chance, that which comes or falls. This sense of sort is probably derivative, signifying that which is thrown out, separated or selected.]

1. A kind or species; any number or collection of individual persons or thing characterized by the same or like qualities; as a sort of men; a sort of horses; a sort of trees; a sort of poems or writings. sort is not a technical word, and therefore is used with less precision or more latitude than genus or species in the sciences.

2. Manner; form of being or acting. Flowers, in such sort worn, can neither be smelt not seen well by those that wear them. To Adam in what sort shall I appear?

3. Class or order; as men of the wiser sort or the better sort; all sorts of people. [See Def. 1.]

4. Rank; condition above the vulgar. [Not in use.]

5. A company or knot of people. [Not in use.]

6. Degree of any quality. I shall not be wholly without praise, if in some sort I have copied his style.

7. Lot.

8. A pair; a set; a suit.

SORT, verb transitive

1. To separate, as things having like qualities from other things, and place them in distinct classes or divisions; as, to sort cloths according to their colors; to sort wool or thread according to its fineness. Shell fish have been, be some of the ancients, compared and sorted with insects. Rays which differ in refrangibility may be parted and sorted from one another.

2. To reduce to order from a state of confusion. [See supra.]

3. To conjoin; to put together in distribution. The swain perceiving by her word ill sorted, that she was wholly from herself transported-

4. To cull; to choose from a number; to select. That he may sort her out a worthy spouse.

SORT, verb intransitive

1. To be joined with others of the same species. Nor do metals only sort with metals in the earth, and minerals with minerals.

2. To consort; to associate. The illiberality of parents towards children, makes them base and sort with any company.

3. To suit; to fit. They are happy whose natures sort with their vocations.

4. To terminate; to issue; to have success. [Not in use.]

5. To fall out. [Not in use.]

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

welkin

WELKIN, n. [G., a cloud.] The visible regions of the air; the vault of heaven. [This is obsolete, unless in poetry.]

Welkin eye, in Shakespeare, is interpreted by Johnson, a blue eye, from welkin, the sky; by Todd, a rolling eye, from Sax. Wealcan, to roll; and by Entick, a languishing eye. See Welk. It is obsolete, at least in New England.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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