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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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so

SO, adv. [L. sic, contracted. It is from some root signifying to set, to still, and this sense is retained in the use of the word by milkmaids, who say to cows, so, so, that is, stand still, remain as you are; and in this use, the word may be the original verb.]

1. In like manner, answering to as, and noting comparison or resemblance; as with the people, so with the priest.

2. In such a degree; to that degree. Why is his chariot so long in coming? Judges 5.

3. In such a manner; sometimes repeated, so and so; as certain colors, mingled so and so.

4. It is followed by as. There is something equivalent in France and Scotland; so as it is a hard calumny upon our soil to affirm that so excellent a fruit will not grow here. But in like phrases, we now use that; "so that it is a hard calumny;" and this may be considered as the extablished usage.

5. In the smae manner. Use your tutor with great respect, and cause all your family to do so too.

6. Thus; in this manner; as New York so called from the duke of York. I know not why it is, but so it is. It concerns every man, with the greatest seriousness, to inquire whether theese thing are so or not.

7. Therefore; thus; for this reason; in consequence of this or that. It leaves instruction, and so instructors, to the sobriety fo the settled articles of the church. God makes him in own image an intelectual creature, and so capable of dominion. This statute made the clipping of coin hign treason, which it was not at common law; so that this was an enlarging staute.

8. On these terms, noting a conditional petition. Here then exchange we mutually forgiveness; SO may the guilt of all my broken vows, my perjuries to thee be all forgotten. So here might be expressed by thus, that is, in this manner, by this mutual forgiveness.

9. Provided that; on condition that, [L. modo.] So the doctrine by but wholesome and edifying though there should be a want of exactness in the manner of speaking and resoning, it may be overlooked. I care not who furnishes the means, so they are furnished.

10. In like manner, noting the concession of one proposition of fact and the assumption of another; answering to as. As a war should be undertaken upon a just motive, so a prince ought to consider the condition he is in when he enters on it.

11. So often expresses the sense of a word or sentence going before. In this case it prevents a repetition, and may be considered as a substitute for the word or phrase. "France is highly cultivated, but England is more so," that is, more highly cultivated.

12. Thus; thus it is; this is the state. How sorrow shakes him! So now the tempest tears him up by th' roots.

13. Well; the fact being such. And so the work is done, is it?

14. It is sometimes used to express a certain degree, implying comparison, and yet without the corresponding word as, to render the degree definite. An astringent is not quite so proper, where relaxing the urinary passages is necessary.

15. It is sometimes equivalent to be it so, let it be so, let it be as it is, or in that manner. There is Percy; if your father will do me any honor, so; if not, let him kill the next Percy himself.

16. It expresses a wish, desire or petition. Ready are the appellant and defendant- So please your highness to behold the fight.

17. So much as, however much. Instead of so, we now generally use as; as much as, that much; whatever the quantity may be.

18. So so, or so repeated, used as a kind of exclamation; equivalent to well, well; or it is so, the thing is done. So, so, it works; now, mistress, sit you fast.

19. So so, much as it was; indifferently; not well not much amiss. His leg is but so so.

20. So then, thus then it is; therefore; the consequence is. So then the Volscians stand; but as at first ready, when time shall prompt them, to make road upon's again.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [so]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SO, adv. [L. sic, contracted. It is from some root signifying to set, to still, and this sense is retained in the use of the word by milkmaids, who say to cows, so, so, that is, stand still, remain as you are; and in this use, the word may be the original verb.]

1. In like manner, answering to as, and noting comparison or resemblance; as with the people, so with the priest.

2. In such a degree; to that degree. Why is his chariot so long in coming? Judges 5.

3. In such a manner; sometimes repeated, so and so; as certain colors, mingled so and so.

4. It is followed by as. There is something equivalent in France and Scotland; so as it is a hard calumny upon our soil to affirm that so excellent a fruit will not grow here. But in like phrases, we now use that; "so that it is a hard calumny;" and this may be considered as the extablished usage.

5. In the smae manner. Use your tutor with great respect, and cause all your family to do so too.

6. Thus; in this manner; as New York so called from the duke of York. I know not why it is, but so it is. It concerns every man, with the greatest seriousness, to inquire whether theese thing are so or not.

7. Therefore; thus; for this reason; in consequence of this or that. It leaves instruction, and so instructors, to the sobriety fo the settled articles of the church. God makes him in own image an intelectual creature, and so capable of dominion. This statute made the clipping of coin hign treason, which it was not at common law; so that this was an enlarging staute.

8. On these terms, noting a conditional petition. Here then exchange we mutually forgiveness; SO may the guilt of all my broken vows, my perjuries to thee be all forgotten. So here might be expressed by thus, that is, in this manner, by this mutual forgiveness.

9. Provided that; on condition that, [L. modo.] So the doctrine by but wholesome and edifying though there should be a want of exactness in the manner of speaking and resoning, it may be overlooked. I care not who furnishes the means, so they are furnished.

10. In like manner, noting the concession of one proposition of fact and the assumption of another; answering to as. As a war should be undertaken upon a just motive, so a prince ought to consider the condition he is in when he enters on it.

11. So often expresses the sense of a word or sentence going before. In this case it prevents a repetition, and may be considered as a substitute for the word or phrase. "France is highly cultivated, but England is more so," that is, more highly cultivated.

12. Thus; thus it is; this is the state. How sorrow shakes him! So now the tempest tears him up by th' roots.

13. Well; the fact being such. And so the work is done, is it?

14. It is sometimes used to express a certain degree, implying comparison, and yet without the corresponding word as, to render the degree definite. An astringent is not quite so proper, where relaxing the urinary passages is necessary.

15. It is sometimes equivalent to be it so, let it be so, let it be as it is, or in that manner. There is Percy; if your father will do me any honor, so; if not, let him kill the next Percy himself.

16. It expresses a wish, desire or petition. Ready are the appellant and defendant- So please your highness to behold the fight.

17. So much as, however much. Instead of so, we now generally use as; as much as, that much; whatever the quantity may be.

18. So so, or so repeated, used as a kind of exclamation; equivalent to well, well; or it is so, the thing is done. So, so, it works; now, mistress, sit you fast.

19. So so, much as it was; indifferently; not well not much amiss. His leg is but so so.

20. So then, thus then it is; therefore; the consequence is. So then the Volscians stand; but as at first ready, when time shall prompt them, to make road upon's again.

SO, adv. [Goth. swa; Sax. swa; G. so; D. zo; Dan. saa; Sw. ; perhaps L. sic, contracted, or Heb. שוה, to compose, to set. In Ir. so is this or that. It is the same in Scots. It is from some root signifying to set, to still, and this sense is retained in the use of the word by milkmaids, who say to cows, so, so, that is, stand still, remain as you are; and in this use, the word may be the original verb.]

  1. In like manner, answering to as, and noting comparison or resemblance; as with the people, so with the priest.
  2. In such a degree; to that degree. Why is his chariot so long in coming? – Judges v.
  3. In such a manner; sometimes repeated so and so; as, certain colors, mingled so and so. – Suckling.
  4. It is followed by as. There is something equivalent in France and Scotland; so as it is a hard calumny upon our soil to affirm that so excellent a fruit will not grow here. – Temple. But in like phrases, we now use that; “so that it is a hard calumny;” and this may be considered as the established usage.
  5. In the same manner. Use your tutor with great respect, and cause all your family to do so too. – Locke.
  6. Thus; in this manner; as, New York so called from the Duke of York. I know not why it is, but so it is. It concerns every man, with the greatest seriousness, to inquire whether these things are so or not. – Tillotson.
  7. Therefore; thus; for this reason; in consequence of this or that. It leaves instruction, and so instructors, to the sobriety of the settled articles of the church. – Holyday. God makes him in his own image an intellectual creature, and so capable of dominion. – Locke. This statute made the clipping of coin high treason, which it was not at common law; so that this was an enlarging statute. – Blackstone.
  8. On these terms, noting a conditional petition. Here then exchange we mutually forgiveness; / So may the guilt of all my broken vows, / My perjuries to thee be all forgotten. – Rowe. So here might be expressed by thus, that is, in this manner, by this mutual forgiveness.
  9. Provided that; on condition that. [L. modo.] So the doctrine be but wholesome and edifying … though there should be a want of exactness in the manner of speaking and reasoning, it may he overlooked. – Atterbury. I care not who furnishes the means, so they are furnished. – Anon.
  10. In like manner, noting the concession of one proposition or fact and the assumption of another; answering to as. As a war should be undertaken upon a just motive, so a prince ought to consider the condition he is in when he enters on it. – Swift.
  11. So often expresses the sense of a word or sentence going before. In this case it prevents a repetition, and may be considered as a substitute for the word or phrase. “France is highly cultivated, but England is more so,” that is, more highly cultivated. – Arthur Young. To make men happy, and to keep them so. – Creech.
  12. Thus; thus it is; this is the state. How sorrow shakes him! / So now the tempest tears him up by th' roots. – Dryden.
  13. Well; the fact being such. And so the work is done, is it?
  14. It is sometimes used to express a certain degree, implying comparison, and yet without the corresponding word as, to render the degree definite. An astringent is not quite so proper, where relaxing the urinary passages is necessary. – Arbuthnot. That is, not perfectly proper, or not so proper as something else not specified.
  15. It is sometimes equivalent to be it so, let it be so, let it be as it is, or in that manner. There is Percy; if your father will do me any honor, so; if not, let him kill the next Percy himself. – Shak.
  16. It expresses a wish, desire or petition. Ready are the appellant and defendant … / So please your highness to behold the fight. – Shak.
  17. So much as, however much. Instead of so, we now generally use as; as much as, that much; whatever the quantity may be.
  18. So so, or so repeated, used as a kind of exclamation; equivalent to well, well; or it is so, the thing is done. So, so, it works; now, mistress, sit you fast. – Dryden.
  19. So so, much as it was; indifferently; not well nor much amiss. His leg is but so so. – Shak.
  20. So then, thus then it is; therefore; the consequence is. So then the Volscians stand; but as at first / Ready, when time shall prompt them, to make road / Upon's again. – Shak.

SO, v.t.

Stand still; a word used in the imperative only, by milkmaids. [See the next word.]


So
  1. In that manner or degree; as, indicated (in any way), or as implied, or as supposed to be known.

    Why is his chariot so long in coming? Judges v. 28.

  2. Provided that; on condition that; in case that; if.

    Though all the winds of doctrine were let loose play upon the earth, so truth be in the field, we do injuriously, by licensing and prohibiting, to misdoubt her strength. Milton.

  3. Be as you are; stand still; stop; that will do; right as you are; -- a word used esp. to cows; also used by sailors.
  4. In like manner or degree; in the same way; thus; for like reason; whith equal reason; -- used correlatively, following as, to denote comparison or resemblance; sometimes, also, following inasmuch as.

    As a war should be undertaken upon a just motive, so a prince ought to consider the condition he is in. Swift.

  5. In such manner; to such degree; -- used correlatively with as or that following; as, he was so fortunate as to escape.

    I viewed in may mind, so far as I was able, the beginning and progress of a rising world. T. Burnet.

    He is very much in Sir Roger's esteem, so that he lives in the family rather as a relation than dependent. Addison.

  6. Very; in a high degree; that is, in such a degree as can not well be expressed; as, he is so good; he planned so wisely.
  7. In the same manner; as has been stated or suggested; in this or that condition or state; under these circumstances; in this way; -- with reflex reference to something just asserted or implied; used also with the verb to be, as a predicate.

    Use him [your tutor] with great respect yourself, and cause all your family to do so too. Locke.

    It concerns every man, with the greatest seriousness, to inquire into those matters, whether they be so or not. Tillotson.

    He is Sir Robert's son, and so art thou. Shak.

  8. The case being such; therefore; on this account; for this reason; on these terms; -- used both as an adverb and a conjuction.

    God makes him in his own image an intellectual creature, and so capable of dominion. Locke.

    Here, then, exchange we mutually forgiveness;
    So may the guilt of all my broken vows,
    My perjuries to thee, be all forgotten.
    Rowe.

  9. It is well; let it be as it is, or let it come to pass; -- used to express assent.

    And when 't is writ, for my sake read it over,
    And if it please you, so; if not, why, so.
    Shak.

    There is Percy; if your father will do me any honor, so; if not, let him kill the next Percy himself. Shak.

  10. Well; the fact being as stated; -- used as an expletive; as, so the work is done, is it?
  11. Is it thus? do you mean what you say? -- with an upward tone; as, do you say he refuses? So?

    [Colloq.]
  12. About the number, time, or quantity specified; thereabouts; more or less; as, I will spend a week or so in the country; I have read only a page or so.

    A week or so will probably reconcile us. Gay.

    * See the Note under Ill, adv.

    So . . . as. So is now commonly used as a demonstrative correlative of as when it is the puprpose to emphasize the equality or comparison suggested, esp. in negative assertions, and questions implying a negative answer. By Shakespeare and others so . . . as was much used where as . . . as is now common. See the Note under As, 1.

    So do, as thou hast said. Gen. xviii. 5.

    As a flower of the field, so he flourisheth. Ps. ciii. 15.

    Had woman been so strong as men. Shak.

    No country suffered so much as England. Macaulay.

    -- So far, to that point or extent; in that particular. "The song was moral, and so far was right." Cowper. -- So far forth, as far; to such a degree. Shak. Bacon. -- So forth, further in the same or similar manner; more of the same or a similar kind. See And so forth, under And. -- So, so, well, well. "So, so, it works; now, mistress, sit you fast." Dryden. Also, moderately or tolerably well; passably; as, he succeeded but so so. "His leg is but so so." Shak. -- So that, to the end that; in order that; with the effect or result that. -- So then, thus then it is; therefore; the consequence is.

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So

SO, adverb [Latin sic, contracted. It is from some root signifying to set, to still, and this sense is retained in the use of the word by milkmaids, who say to cows, so so that is, stand still, remain as you are; and in this use, the word may be the original verb.]

1. In like manner, answering to as, and noting comparison or resemblance; as with the people, so with the priest.

2. In such a degree; to that degree. Why is his chariot so long in coming? Judges 5:28.

3. In such a manner; sometimes repeated, so and so; as certain colors, mingled so and so

4. It is followed by as. There is something equivalent in France and Scotland; so as it is a hard calumny upon our soil to affirm that so excellent a fruit will not grow here. But in like phrases, we now use that; 'so that it is a hard calumny; ' and this may be considered as the extablished usage.

5. In the smae manner. Use your tutor with great respect, and cause all your family to do so too.

6. Thus; in this manner; as New York so called from the duke of York. I know not why it is, but so it is. It concerns every man, with the greatest seriousness, to inquire whether theese thing are so or not.

7. Therefore; thus; for this reason; in consequence of this or that. It leaves instruction, and so instructors, to the sobriety fo the settled articles of the church. God makes him in own image an intelectual creature, and so capable of dominion. This statute made the clipping of coin hign treason, which it was not at common law; so that this was an enlarging staute.

8. On these terms, noting a conditional petition. Here then exchange we mutually forgiveness; so may the guilt of all my broken vows, my perjuries to thee be all forgotten. so here might be expressed by thus, that is, in this manner, by this mutual forgiveness.

9. Provided that; on condition that, [Latin modo.] so the doctrine by but wholesome and edifying though there should be a want of exactness in the manner of speaking and resoning, it may be overlooked. I care not who furnishes the means, so they are furnished.

10. In like manner, noting the concession of one proposition of fact and the assumption of another; answering to as. As a war should be undertaken upon a just motive, so a prince ought to consider the condition he is in when he enters on it.

11. so often expresses the sense of a word or sentence going before. In this case it prevents a repetition, and may be considered as a substitute for the word or phrase. 'France is highly cultivated, but England is more so ' that is, more highly cultivated.

12. Thus; thus it is; this is the state. How sorrow shakes him! so now the tempest tears him up by th' roots.

13. Well; the fact being such. And so the work is done, is it?

14. It is sometimes used to express a certain degree, implying comparison, and yet without the corresponding word as, to render the degree definite. An astringent is not quite so proper, where relaxing the urinary passages is necessary.

15. It is sometimes equivalent to be it so let it be so let it be as it is, or in that manner. There is Percy; if your father will do me any honor, so; if not, let him kill the next Percy himself.

16. It expresses a wish, desire or petition. Ready are the appellant and defendant- so please your highness to behold the fight.

17. so much as, however much. Instead of so we now generally use as; as much as, that much; whatever the quantity may be.

18. so so or so repeated, used as a kind of exclamation; equivalent to well, well; or it is so the thing is done. so so it works; now, mistress, sit you fast.

19. so so much as it was; indifferently; not well not much amiss. His leg is but so so

20. so then, thus then it is; therefore; the consequence is. so then the Volscians stand; but as at first ready, when time shall prompt them, to make road upon's again.

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importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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