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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [slip]

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slip

SLIP, v.i. [L. labor, to slide.]

1. To slide; to glide; to move along the surface of a thing without bounding, rolling or stepping.

2. To slide; not to tread firmly. Walk carefully, lest your foot should slip.

3. TO move or fly out of place; usually without; as, a bone may slip out of its place.

4. To sneak; to slink; to depart or withdraw secretly; with away. Thus one tradesman slips away to give his partner fairer play.

5. To err; to fall into error or fault. One slippeth in his speech, but not from his heart.

6. To glide; to pass unexpectedly or imperceptibly. And thrice the flitting shadow slipp'd away.

7. To enter by oversight. An error may slip into a copy, notwithstanding all possible car.

8. To escape insensibly; to be lost. Use the most proper methods to retain the ideas you have acquired, for the mind is ready to let many of them slip.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [slip]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SLIP, v.i. [L. labor, to slide.]

1. To slide; to glide; to move along the surface of a thing without bounding, rolling or stepping.

2. To slide; not to tread firmly. Walk carefully, lest your foot should slip.

3. TO move or fly out of place; usually without; as, a bone may slip out of its place.

4. To sneak; to slink; to depart or withdraw secretly; with away. Thus one tradesman slips away to give his partner fairer play.

5. To err; to fall into error or fault. One slippeth in his speech, but not from his heart.

6. To glide; to pass unexpectedly or imperceptibly. And thrice the flitting shadow slipp'd away.

7. To enter by oversight. An error may slip into a copy, notwithstanding all possible car.

8. To escape insensibly; to be lost. Use the most proper methods to retain the ideas you have acquired, for the mind is ready to let many of them slip.

SLIP, n.1

  1. A sliding; act of slipping.
  2. An unintentional error or fault. – Dryden.
  3. A twig separated from the main stock; as, the slip of a vine.
  4. A leash or string by which a dog is held; so called from its being so made as to slip or become loose by relaxation of the hand. – Shak.
  5. An escape; a secret or unexpected desertion.
  6. A long narrow piece; as, a slip of paper. – Addison.
  7. A counterfeit piece of money, being brass covered with silver. [Not in use.] – Shak.
  8. Matter found in troughs of grindstones after the grinding of edge-tools. [Local.] Petty.
  9. A particular quantity of yarn. [Local.] – Barret.
  10. An opening between wharves or in a dock. [N. York.]
  11. A place having a gradual descent on the bank of a river or harbor, convenient for shipbuilding. – Mar. Dict.
  12. A long seat or narrow pew in churches. [United States.]

SLIP, n.2

In geology, a mass of strata separated vertically or aslant.


SLIP, v.i. [Sax. slepan; D. sleppen; Sw. slippa; Dan. sliipper; G. schlüpfen, schliefen; W. yslib, smooth, glib, from llib; L. labor, to slide.]

  1. To slide; to glide; to move along the surface of a thing without bounding, rolling or stepping.
  2. To slide; not to tread firmly. Walk carefully, lest your foot should slip.
  3. To move or fly out of place; usually with out; as, a bone may slip out of its place. – Wiseman.
  4. To sneak; to slink; to depart or withdraw secretly; with away. Thus one tradesman slips away, / To give his partner fairer play. – Prior.
  5. To err; to fall into error or fault. One slippeth in his speech, but not from his heart. – Ecclus.
  6. To glide; to pass unexpectedly or imperceptibly. And thrice the flitting shadow slipp'd away. – Dryden.
  7. To enter by oversight. An error may slip into a copy, notwithstanding all possible care.
  8. To escape insensibly; to be lost. Use the most proper methods to retain the ideas you have acquired, for the mind is ready to let many of them slip. – Watts.

SLIP, v.t.

  1. To convey secretly. He tried to slip a powder into her drink. – Arbuthnot.
  2. To omit; to lose by negligence. Let us not slip the occasion. And slip no advantage / That may secure you. – B. Jonson.
  3. To part twigs from the branches or stem of a tree. The branches also may be slipped and planted. – Mortimer.
  4. To escape from; to leave slily. Lucentio slipp'd me like his greyhound. – Shak. From is here understood.
  5. To let loose; as, to slip the bounds. – Dryden.
  6. To throw off; to disengage one's self from; as, a horse slips his bridle.
  7. To pass over or omit negligently; as, to slip over the main points of a subject.
  8. To tear off; as, to slip off a twig.
  9. To suffer abortion; to miscarry; as a beast. To slip a cable, to veer out and let go the end. – Mar. Dict. To slip on, to put on in haste or loosely; as, to slip on a gown or coat.

Slip
  1. To move along the surface of a thing without bounding, rolling, or stepping; to slide; to glide.
  2. To cause to move smoothly and quickly; to slide; to convey gently or secretly.

    He tried to slip a powder into her drink. Arbuthnot.

  3. The act of slipping; as, a slip on the ice.
  4. The retrograde movement on a pulley of a belt as it slips.

    (b)
  5. To slide; to lose one's footing or one's hold; not to tread firmly; as, it is necessary to walk carefully lest the foot should slip.
  6. To omit; to loose by negligence.

    And slip no advantage
    That my secure you.
    B. Jonson.

  7. An unintentional error or fault; a false step.

    This good man's slip mended his pace to martyrdom. Fuller.

  8. The difference between the actual and synchronous speed of an induction motor.
  9. To move or fly (out of place); to shoot; -- often with out, off, etc.; as, a bone may slip out of its place.
  10. To cut slips from; to cut; to take off; to make a slip or slips of; as, to slip a piece of cloth or paper.

    The branches also may be slipped and planted. Mortimer.

  11. A twig separated from the main stock; a cutting; a scion; hence, a descendant; as, a slip from a vine.

    A native slip to us from foreign seeds. Shak.

    The girlish slip of a Sicilian bride. R. Browning.

  12. A memorandum of the particulars of a risk for which a policy is to be executed. It usually bears the broker's name and is initiated by the underwrites.
  13. To depart, withdraw, enter, appear, intrude, or escape as if by sliding; to go or come in a quiet, furtive manner; as, some errors slipped into the work.

    Thus one tradesman slips away,
    To give his partner fairer play.
    Prior.

    Thrice the flitting shadow slipped away. Dryden.

  14. To let loose in pursuit of game, as a greyhound.

    Lucento slipped me like his greyhound. Shak.

  15. A slender piece; a strip; as, a slip of paper.

    Moonlit slips of silver cloud. Tennyson.

    A thin slip of a girl, like a new moon
    Sure to be rounded into beauty soon.
    Longfellow.

  16. To err; to fall into error or fault.

    There is one that slippeth in his speech, but not from his heart. Ecclus. xix. 16.

    To let slip, to loose from the slip or noose, as a hound; to allow to escape.

    Cry, "Havoc," and let slip the dogs of war. Shak.

  17. To cause to slip or slide off, or out of place; as, a horse slips his bridle; a dog slips his collar.
  18. A leash or string by which a dog is held; - - so called from its being made in such a manner as to slip, or become loose, by relaxation of the hand.

    We stalked over the extensive plains with Killbuck and Lena in the slips, in search of deer. Sir S. Baker.

  19. To bring forth (young) prematurely; to slink.

    To slip a cable. (Naut.) See under Cable. -- To slip off, to take off quickly; as, to slip off a coat. -- To slip on, to put on in haste or loosely; as, to slip on a gown or coat.

  20. An escape; a secret or unexpected desertion; as, to give one the slip.

    Shak.
  21. A portion of the columns of a newspaper or other work struck off by itself; a proof from a column of type when set up and in the galley.
  22. Any covering easily slipped on.

    Specifically: (a)
  23. A counterfeit piece of money, being brass covered with silver.

    [Obs.] Shak.
  24. Matter found in troughs of grindstones after the grinding of edge tools.

    [Prov. Eng.] Sir W. Petty.
  25. Potter's clay in a very liquid state, used for the decoration of ceramic ware, and also as a cement for handles and other applied parts.
  26. A particular quantity of yarn.

    [Prov. Eng.]
  27. An inclined plane on which a vessel is built, or upon which it is hauled for repair.
  28. An opening or space for vessels to lie in, between wharves or in a dock; as, Peck slip.

    [U. S.]
  29. A narrow passage between buildings.

    [Eng.]
  30. A long seat or narrow pew in churches, often without a door.

    [U. S.]
  31. A dislocation of a lead, destroying continuity.

    Knight.
  32. The motion of the center of resistance of the float of a paddle wheel, or the blade of an oar, through the water horozontally, or the difference between a vessel's actual speed and the speed which she would have if the propelling instrument acted upon a solid; also, the velocity, relatively to still water, of the backward current of water produced by the propeller.
  33. A fish, the sole.
  34. A fielder stationed on the off side and to the rear of the batsman. There are usually two of them, called respectively short slip, and long slip.

    To give one the slip, to slip away from one; to elude one. -- Slip dock. See under Dock. -- Slip link (Mach.), a connecting link so arranged as to allow some play of the parts, to avoid concussion. -- Slip rope (Naut.), a rope by which a cable is secured preparatory to slipping. Totten. -- Slip stopper (Naut.), an arrangement for letting go the anchor suddenly.

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Slip

SLIP, verb intransitive [Latin labor, to slide.]

1. To slide; to glide; to move along the surface of a thing without bounding, rolling or stepping.

2. To slide; not to tread firmly. Walk carefully, lest your foot should slip

3. TO move or fly out of place; usually without; as, a bone may slip out of its place.

4. To sneak; to slink; to depart or withdraw secretly; with away. Thus one tradesman slips away to give his partner fairer play.

5. To err; to fall into error or fault. One slippeth in his speech, but not from his heart.

6. To glide; to pass unexpectedly or imperceptibly. And thrice the flitting shadow slipp'd away.

7. To enter by oversight. An error may slip into a copy, notwithstanding all possible car.

8. To escape insensibly; to be lost. Use the most proper methods to retain the ideas you have acquired, for the mind is ready to let many of them slip

SLIP, verb transitive

1.To convey secretly. He tried to slip a powder into her drink.

2. To omit; to lose by negligence. Let us not slip the occasion. And slip no advantage that may secure you.

3. To part twigs from the branches or stem of a tree. The branches also may be slipped and planted.

4. To escape from; to leave slily. Lucentio slipp'd me like his greyhound. From is here understood.

5. To let loose; as, to slip the hounds.

6. To throw off; to disengage one's self from; as, a horse slip his bridle.

7. To pass over or omit negligently; as, to slip over that main points of a subject.

8. To tear off; as, to slip off a twig.

9. To suffer abortion; to miscarry; as a beast.

TO slip A CABLE, to veer out and let go the end.

TO slip ON, to put on in haste or loosely; as to slip on a gown or coat.

SLIP, noun

1. A sliding; act of slipping.

2. An unintentional error or fault.

3. A twig separated from the main stock; as the slip of a vine.

4. A leash or string by which a dog is held; so called from its being so made as to slip or become loose by relaxation of the hand.

5. An escape; a secret or unexpected desertion.

6. A long narrow piece; as a slip of paper.

7. A counterfeit piece of money, being brass covered with silver. [Not in use.]

8. Matter found in troughs of grindstones after the grinding of edge-tools.

9. A particular quantity of yarn.

10. An opening between wharves or in a dock.

11. A place having a gradual descent on the bank of a river or harbor, convenient for ship-building.

12. A long seat or narrow pew in churches.

SLIP'-BOARD, noun A board sliding in grooves.

SLIP'-KNOT, noun A bow-knot; a knot which will not beat a strain, or which os easily untied.

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Bible references, not as corrupted as new dictionaries.

— Doc (Cleveland, GA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

enhancing

ENH`ANCING, ppr. Raising; increasing; augmenting; aggravating.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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