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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [skill]

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skill

SKILL, n. Calleo, that is to strain, stretch, reach, and with to perfect, that is, to make sound, or to reach the utmost limit. The sense of folly, error, sin, preverseness, is from wandering, deviation.

1. The familiar knowledge of any art or science, united with readiness and dexterity in execution or performance, or in the application of the art or science to practical purposes. Thus we speak of the skill of a mathematician, of a surveyor, of a physician or surgeon, of a mechanic or seaman. So we speak of skill in management or negotiation.

2. Any particular art.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [skill]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SKILL, n. Calleo, that is to strain, stretch, reach, and with to perfect, that is, to make sound, or to reach the utmost limit. The sense of folly, error, sin, preverseness, is from wandering, deviation.

1. The familiar knowledge of any art or science, united with readiness and dexterity in execution or performance, or in the application of the art or science to practical purposes. Thus we speak of the skill of a mathematician, of a surveyor, of a physician or surgeon, of a mechanic or seaman. So we speak of skill in management or negotiation.

2. Any particular art.

SKILL, n. [Sax. scylan, to separate, to distinguish; Ice. and Sw. skilia, Dan. skiller, to divide, sever, part; whence shield, that which separates, and hence that which protects or defends; D. scheelen, to differ; schillen, to peel or pare. Scale is from the root of these words, as in shell, Sax. scyl, sceal. In Heb. סכל is foolish, perverse, and as a verb, to pervert, to be foolish or perverse; in Ch. to understand or consider, to look, to regard, to cause to know, whence knowledge, knowing, wise, wisdom, understanding; Rab. to be ignorant or foolish; Syr. to be foolish, to wander in mind, also to cause to understand, to know, to perceive, to discern, also to err, to do wrong, to sin, to fail in duty; whence foolish, folly, ignorance, error, sin, and understanding; Sam. to be wont or accustomed, to look or behold. The same verb with ש, Heb. שבל signifies to understand, to be wise, whence wisdom, understanding, also to waste, to scatter or destroy, to bereave, also to prosper; Ch. to understand; שבלל to complete, to perfect; בלל with a prefix. This signifies also to found, to lay a foundation; Syr. to found, also to finish, complete, adorn, from the same root; Ar. شَكَلَ shakala; to bind or tie, whence Eng. shackles; also to be dark, obscure, intricate, difficult, to form, to make like, to be of a beautiful form, to know, to be ignorant, to agree, suit or become. These verbs appear to be formed on the root בל, בול to hold or restrain, which coincides in signification with the Ch. and Eth. בחל to be able, L. calleo, that is, to strain, stretch, reach, and with כלל to perfect, that is, to make sound, or to reach the utmost limit. The sense of folly, error, sin, perverseness, is from wandering, deviation, Gr. σκολιος; the sense of skill and understanding is from separation, discernment, or from taking, holding or reaching to, for strength and knowledge are allied, and often from tension. The sense of ignorance and error is from wandering or deviation, or perhaps it proceeds from a negative sense given to the primary verb by the prefix, like ex in Latin, and s in Italian. The Arabic sense of binding and shackles is from straining. The Eng. shall and should belong to its family.]

  1. The familiar knowledge of any art or science, united with readiness and dexterity in execution or performance, or in the application of the art or science to practical purposes. Thus we speak of the skill of a mathematician, of a surveyor, of a physician or surgeon, of a mechanic or seaman. So we speak of skill in management or negotiation. – Dryden. Swift.
  2. Any particular art. [Not in use.] – Hooker.

SKILL, v.i.

  1. To be knowing in; to be dextrous in performance. [Obs.] – Spenser.
  2. To differ; to make difference; to matter or be of interest. [Obs.] – Hooker. Bacon. [This is the Teutonic and Gothic sense of the word.]

SKILL, v.t.

To know; to understand. [Obs.]


Skill
  1. Discrimination; judgment; propriety; reason; cause.

    [Obs.] Shak. "As it was skill and right." Chaucer.

    For great skill is, he prove that he wrought. [For with good reason he should test what he created.] Chaucer.

  2. To know; to understand.

    [Obs.]

    To skill the arts of expressing our mind. Barrow.

  3. To be knowing; to have understanding; to be dexterous in performance.

    [Obs.]

    I can not skill of these thy ways. Herbert.

  4. Knowledge; understanding.

    [Obsoles.]

    That by his fellowship he color might
    Both his estate and love from skill of any wight.
    Spenser.

    Nor want we skill or art. Milton.

  5. To make a difference; to signify; to matter; -- used impersonally.

    Spenser.

    What skills it, if a bag of stones or gold
    About thy neck do drown thee?
    Herbert.

    It skills not talking of it. Sir W. Scott.

  6. The familiar knowledge of any art or science, united with readiness and dexterity in execution or performance, or in the application of the art or science to practical purposes; power to discern and execute; ability to perceive and perform; expertness; aptitude; as, the skill of a mathematician, physician, surgeon, mechanic, etc.

    Phocion, . . . by his great wisdom and skill at negotiations, diverted Alexander from the conquest of Athens. Swift.

    Where patience her sweet skill imparts. Keble.

  7. Display of art; exercise of ability; contrivance; address.

    [Obs.]

    Richard . . . by a thousand princely skills, gathering so much corn as if he meant not to return. Fuller.

  8. Any particular art.

    [Obs.]

    Learned in one skill, and in another kind of learning unskillful. Hooker.

    Syn. -- Dexterity; adroitness; expertness; art; aptitude; ability. -- Skill, Dexterity, Adroitness. Skill is more intelligent, denoting familiar knowledge united to readiness of performance. Dexterity, when applied to the body, is more mechanical, and refers to habitual ease of execution. Adroitness involves the same image with dexterity, and differs from it as implaying a general facility of movement (especially in avoidance of danger or in escaping from a difficalty). The same distinctions apply to the figurative sense of the words. A man is skillful in any employment when he understands both its theory and its practice. He is dexterous when he maneuvers with great lightness. He is adroit in the use od quick, sudden, and well-directed movements of the body or the mind, so as to effect the object he has in view.

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Skill

SKILL, noun Calleo, that is to strain, stretch, reach, and with to perfect, that is, to make sound, or to reach the utmost limit. The sense of folly, error, sin, preverseness, is from wandering, deviation.

1. The familiar knowledge of any art or science, united with readiness and dexterity in execution or performance, or in the application of the art or science to practical purposes. Thus we speak of the skill of a mathematician, of a surveyor, of a physician or surgeon, of a mechanic or seaman. So we speak of skill in management or negotiation.

2. Any particular art.

SKILL, verb transitive To know; to understand.

SKILL, verb intransitive

1. To be knowing in; to be dextrous in performance.

2. To differ; to make difference; to matter or be of interest.

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Historical and biblical significance

— Preston (Peck, KS)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

unsingled

UNSIN'GLED, a. Not singled; not separated.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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