HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Tuesday - March 9, 2021

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [sit]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

sit

SIT, v.i. pret. sat; old pp. sitten [L. sedeo.]

1. To rest upon the buttocks, as animals; as, to sit on a sofa or on the ground.

2. To perch; to rest on the feet; as fowls.

3. To occupy a seat or place in an official capacity. The scribes and the Pharisees sit in Moses' seat. Matt. 23.

4. To be in a state of rest or idleness. Shall your brethren go to war, and shall ye sit here? Num. 32.

5. To rest, lie or bear on, as a weight or burned; as, grief sits heavy on his heart.

6. To settle; to rest; to abide. Pale horror sat on each Arcadian face.

7. To incubate; to cover and warm eggs for hatching; as a fowl. As the partridge sitteth on eggs and hatcheth them not- Jer. 17.

8. To be adjusted; to be, with respect to fitness or unfitness; as, a coat sits well or ill. This new and gorgeous garment, majesty, sits not so easy on me as you think.

9. To be placed in order to be painted; as, to sit for one's picture.

10. To be in any situation or condition. Suppose all the church lands to be thrown up to the laity; would the tenants sit easier in their rents than now?

11. To hold a session; to be officially engaged in public business; as judges, legislators or officers of any kind. The house of commons sometimes sits till late at night. The judges or the courts sit in Westminster hall. The commissioners sit every day.

12. To exercise authority; as, to sit in judgment. One council sits upon life and death.

13. To be in any assembly or council as a member; to have a seat.

14. To be in a local position. The wind sits fair. [Unusual]



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [sit]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SIT, v.i. pret. sat; old pp. sitten [L. sedeo.]

1. To rest upon the buttocks, as animals; as, to sit on a sofa or on the ground.

2. To perch; to rest on the feet; as fowls.

3. To occupy a seat or place in an official capacity. The scribes and the Pharisees sit in Moses' seat. Matt. 23.

4. To be in a state of rest or idleness. Shall your brethren go to war, and shall ye sit here? Num. 32.

5. To rest, lie or bear on, as a weight or burned; as, grief sits heavy on his heart.

6. To settle; to rest; to abide. Pale horror sat on each Arcadian face.

7. To incubate; to cover and warm eggs for hatching; as a fowl. As the partridge sitteth on eggs and hatcheth them not- Jer. 17.

8. To be adjusted; to be, with respect to fitness or unfitness; as, a coat sits well or ill. This new and gorgeous garment, majesty, sits not so easy on me as you think.

9. To be placed in order to be painted; as, to sit for one's picture.

10. To be in any situation or condition. Suppose all the church lands to be thrown up to the laity; would the tenants sit easier in their rents than now?

11. To hold a session; to be officially engaged in public business; as judges, legislators or officers of any kind. The house of commons sometimes sits till late at night. The judges or the courts sit in Westminster hall. The commissioners sit every day.

12. To exercise authority; as, to sit in judgment. One council sits upon life and death.

13. To be in any assembly or council as a member; to have a seat.

14. To be in a local position. The wind sits fair. [Unusual]

SIT, v.i. [pret. sat; old pp. sitten. Goth. sitan; Sax. sitan, or sittan; D. zitten; G. sitzen; Sw. sitta; Dan. sidder; L. sedeo; It. sedere; Fr. seoir, whence asseoir, to set or place, to lay, to assess, from the participle of which we have assise, assize, a sitting, a session, whence size, by contraction; W. seza, to sit habitually; sezu, to seat; gorsez, a supreme seat; gorsezu, to preside; Arm. aseza, diaseza, sizhea, to sit; Ir. suidhim, eisidhim, and seisim; Corn. seadha, to sit. It coincides with the Ch. and Heb. יסד and Heb. שית, to set, place or found, and perhaps with the Ar. سَدَّ sadda, to stop, close or make firm. See Class Sd, No. 31, 56. See Set. The Sp. sitiar, to besiege, is the same word differently applied.]

  1. To rest upon the buttocks, as animals; as, to sit on a sofa or on the ground.
  2. To perch; to rest on the feet; as fowls.
  3. To occupy a seat or place in an official capacity. The scribes and the Pharisees sit in Moses's seat. Matth. xxiii.
  4. To be in a state of rest or idleness. Shall your brethren go to war, and shall ye sit here? Num. xxxii.
  5. To rest, lie or bear on, as a weight or burden; as, grief sits heavy on his heart.
  6. To settle; to rest; to abide. Pale horror sat on each Arcadian face. Dryden.
  7. To incubate; to cover and warm eggs for hatching; as a fowl. As the partridge sitteth on eggs and hatcheth them not. Jer. xvii.
  8. To be adjusted; to be, with respect to fitness or unfitness; as, a coat sits well or ill. This new and gorgeous garment, majesty, / Sits not so easy on me as you think. – Shak.
  9. To be placed in order to be painted; as, to sit for one's picture.
  10. To be in any situation or condition. Suppose all the church lands to be thrown up to the laity; would the tenants sit easier in their rents than now? Swift.
  11. To hold a session; to be officially engaged in public business; as, judges, legislators or officers of any kind. The house of commons sometimes sits till late at night. The judges or the courts sit in Westminster hall. The commissioners sit every day.
  12. To exercise authority; as, to sit in judgment. One council sits upon life and death.
  13. To be in any assembly or council as a member; to have a seat. 1 Macc.
  14. To be in a local position. The wind sits fair. [Unusual.] To sit at meat, to be at table for eating. To sit down, to place one's self on a chair or other seat; as, to sit down at a meal. #2. To begin a siege. The enemy sat down before the town. #3. To settle; to fix a permanent abode. Spenser. #4. To rest; to cease as satisfied. Here we can not sit dawn, but still proceed in our search. Rogers. To sit out, to be without engagement or employment. [Little used.] Saunderson. To sit up, to rise or be raised from a recumbent posture. He that was dead sat up, and began to speak. Luke vii. #2. Not to go to bed; as, to sit up late at night; also, to watch; as, to sit up with a sick person.

SIT, v.t.

  1. To keep the seat upon. He sits a horse well. [This phrase is elliptical.]
  2. To sit me down, to sit him down, to sit them down, equivalent to I seated myself, &c. are familiar phrases used by good writers, though deviations from strict propriety. They sat them down to weep. Milton.
  3. “The court was sat,” an expression of Addison, is a gross impropriety.

Sit
  1. obs. 3d pers. sing. pres. of Sit, for sitteth.
  2. To rest upon the haunches, or the lower extremity of the trunk of the body; -- said of human beings, and sometimes of other animals; as, to sit on a sofa, on a chair, or on the ground.

    And he came and took the book put of the right hand of him that sate upon the seat. Bible (1551) (Rev. v. 7.)

    I pray you, jest, sir, as you sit at dinner. Shak.

  3. To sit upon; to keep one's seat upon; as, he sits a horse well.

    Hardly the muse can sit the headstrong horse. Prior.

  4. To perch; to rest with the feet drawn up, as birds do on a branch, pole, etc.
  5. To cause to be seated or in a sitting posture; to furnish a seat to; -- used reflexively.

    They sat them down to weep. Milton.

    Sit you down, father; rest you. Shak.

  6. To remain in a state of repose; to rest; to abide; to rest in any position or condition.

    And Moses said to . . . the children of Reuben, Shall your brothren go to war, and shall ye sit here? Num. xxxii. 6.

    Like a demigod here sit I in the sky. Shak.

  7. To suit (well or ill); to become.

    [Obs. or R.]
  8. To lie, rest, or bear; to press or weigh; - - with on; as, a weight or burden sits lightly upon him.

    The calamity sits heavy on us. Jer. Taylor.

  9. To be adjusted; to fit; as, a coat sts well or ill.

    This new and gorgeous garment, majesty,
    Sits not so easy on me as you think.
    Shak.

  10. To suit one well or ill, as an act; to become; to befit; -- used impersonally.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.
  11. To cover and warm eggs for hatching, as a fowl; to brood; to incubate.

    As the partridge sitteth on eggs, and hatcheth them not. Jer. xvii. 11.

  12. To have position, as at the point blown from; to hold a relative position; to have direction.

    Like a good miller that knows how to grind, which way soever the wind sits. Selden.

    Sits the wind in that quarter? Sir W. Scott.

  13. To occupy a place or seat as a member of an official body; as, to sit in Congress.
  14. To hold a session; to be in session for official business; -- said of legislative assemblies, courts, etc.; as, the court sits in January; the aldermen sit to- night.
  15. To take a position for the purpose of having some artistic representation of one's self made, as a picture or a bust; as, to sit to a painter.

    To sit at, to rest under; to be subject to. [Obs.] "A farmer can not husband his ground so well if he sit at a great rent". Bacon. -- To sit at meat or at table, to be at table for eating. -- To sit down. (a) To place one's self on a chair or other seat; as, to sit down when tired. (b) To begin a siege; as, the enemy sat down before the town. (c) To settle; to fix a permanent abode. Spenser. (d) To rest; to cease as satisfied. "Here we can not sit down, but still proceed in our search." Rogers. -- To sit for a fellowship, to offer one's self for examination with a view to obtaining a fellowship. [Eng. Univ.] -- To sit out. (a) To be without engagement or employment. [Obs.] Bp. Sanderson. (b) To outstay. -- To sit under, to be under the instruction or ministrations of; as, to sit under a preacher; to sit under good preaching. -- To sit up, to rise from, or refrain from, a recumbent posture or from sleep; to sit with the body upright; as, to sit up late at night; also, to watch; as, to sit up with a sick person. "He that was dead sat up, and began to speak." Luke vii. 15.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

101

740

84

810

127

821
Sit

SIT, verb intransitive preterit tense sat; old participle passive sitten [Latin sedeo.]

1. To rest upon the buttocks, as animals; as, to sit on a sofa or on the ground.

2. To perch; to rest on the feet; as fowls.

3. To occupy a seat or place in an official capacity. The scribes and the Pharisees sit in Moses' seat. Matthew 23:2.

4. To be in a state of rest or idleness. Shall your brethren go to war, and shall ye sit here? Numbers 32:6.

5. To rest, lie or bear on, as a weight or burned; as, grief sits heavy on his heart.

6. To settle; to rest; to abide. Pale horror sat on each Arcadian face.

7. To incubate; to cover and warm eggs for hatching; as a fowl. As the partridge sitteth on eggs and hatcheth them not- Jeremiah 17:1.

8. To be adjusted; to be, with respect to fitness or unfitness; as, a coat sits well or ill. This new and gorgeous garment, majesty, sits not so easy on me as you think.

9. To be placed in order to be painted; as, to sit for one's picture.

10. To be in any situation or condition. Suppose all the church lands to be thrown up to the laity; would the tenants sit easier in their rents than now?

11. To hold a session; to be officially engaged in public business; as judges, legislators or officers of any kind. The house of commons sometimes sits till late at night. The judges or the courts sit in Westminster hall. The commissioners sit every day.

12. To exercise authority; as, to sit in judgment. One council sits upon life and death.

13. To be in any assembly or council as a member; to have a seat.

14. To be in a local position. The wind sits fair. [Unusual]

To sit at meat, to be at table for eating.

To sit down,

1. to place one's self on a chair or other seat; as, to sit down at a meal.

2. To begin a siege. The enemy sat down before the town.

3. To settle; to fix a permanent abode.

4. To rest; to cease as satisfied. Here we cannot sit down, but still proceed in our search.

To sit out, to be without engagement or employment. [Little used.]

To sit up,

1. To rise or be raised from a recumbent posture. He that was dead sat up, and began to speak. Luke 7:1.

2. Not to go to bed; as, to sit up late at night; also, to watch; as, to sit up with a sick person.

SIT, verb transitive

1. To keep the seat upon. He sits a horse well. [This phrase is elliptical.]

2. To sit me down, To sit him down, to sit them down, equivalent to I seated myself, _ c. are familiar phrases used by good writers, though deviation from strict propriety. They sat them down to weep.

3. 'The court was sat, ' an expression of Addison, is a gross impropriety.

Why 1828?

0
0
 


For context of historical documents such as the Declaration, Constitution, Federalist and other critical writings of our Founders.

— 02.05.2004 (Casa Grande, AZ)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

rhetor

RHE'TOR, n. [L. from Gr. an orator or speaker.]

A rhetorician. [Little used.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

235

419

Compact Edition

213

169

CD-ROM

175

135

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 2.292 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top