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Saturday - November 18, 2017

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [single]

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single

SIN'GLE, a.

1. Separate; one; only; individual; consisting of one only; as a single star; a single city; a single act.

2. Particular; individual. No single man is born with a right of controlling the opinions of all the rest.

3. Uncompounded. Simple ideas are opposed to complex, and single to compound.

4. Alone; having no companion or assistant. Who single hast maintain'd against revolted multitudes the cause of truth.

5. Unmarried; as a single man; a single woman.

6. Not double; not complicated; as a single thread; a single strand of a rope.

7. Performed with one person or antagonist on a side, or with one person only opposed to another; as a single fight; a single combat.

8. Pure; simple; incorrupt; unbiased; having clear vision of divine truth. Matt. 6.

9. Small; weak; silly

10. In botany, a single flower is when there is only one on a stem, and in common usage, one not double.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [single]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SIN'GLE, a.

1. Separate; one; only; individual; consisting of one only; as a single star; a single city; a single act.

2. Particular; individual. No single man is born with a right of controlling the opinions of all the rest.

3. Uncompounded. Simple ideas are opposed to complex, and single to compound.

4. Alone; having no companion or assistant. Who single hast maintain'd against revolted multitudes the cause of truth.

5. Unmarried; as a single man; a single woman.

6. Not double; not complicated; as a single thread; a single strand of a rope.

7. Performed with one person or antagonist on a side, or with one person only opposed to another; as a single fight; a single combat.

8. Pure; simple; incorrupt; unbiased; having clear vision of divine truth. Matt. 6.

9. Small; weak; silly

10. In botany, a single flower is when there is only one on a stem, and in common usage, one not double.

SIN'GLE, a. [L. singulus; probably from a root that signifies to separate.]

  1. Separate; one; only; individual; consisting of one only; as, a single star; a single city; a single act.
  2. Particular; individual. No single man is born with a right of controlling the opinions of all the rest. – Pope.
  3. Uncompounded. Simple ideas are opposed to complex, and single to compound. – Watts.
  4. Alone; having no companion or assistant. Who single hast maintain'd / Against revolted multitudes the cause of truth. – Milton.
  5. Unmarried; as, a single man; a single woman.
  6. Not double; not complicated; as, a single thread; a single strand of a rope.
  7. Performed with one person or antagonist on a side, or with one person only opposed to another; as, a single fight; a single combat.
  8. Pure; simple; incorrupt; unbiased; having clear vision of divine truth. – Matth. vi.
  9. Small; weak; silly. [Obs.] – Beaum. Shak.
  10. In botany, a single flower is when there is only one on a stem, and in common usage, one not double. – Martyn.

SIN'GLE, v.t.

  1. To select, as an individual person or thing from among a number; to choose one from others. A dog who can single out his master in the dark. – Bacon.
  2. To sequester; to withdraw; to retire; as, an agent singling itself from comforts. [Not used.] – Hooker.
  3. To take alone; as, men commendable when singled from society. [Not in use.] – Hooker.
  4. To separate. – Sidney.

Sin"gle
  1. One only, as distinguished from more than one] consisting of one alone; individual; separate; as, a single star.

    No single man is born with a right of controlling the opinions of all the rest. Pope.

  2. To select, as an individual person or thing, from among a number] to choose out from others; to separate.

    Dogs who hereby can single out their master in the dark. Bacon.

    His blood! she faintly screamed her mind
    Still singling one from all mankind.
    More.

  3. To take the irrregular gait called single-foot;- said of a horse. See Single- foot.

    Many very fleet horses, when overdriven, adopt a disagreeable gait, which seems to be a cross between a pace and a trot, in which the two legs of one side are raised almost but not quite, simultaneously. Such horses are said to single, or to be single-footed. W. S. Clark.

  4. A unit; one; as, to score a single.
  5. Alone; having no companion.

    Who single hast maintained,
    Against revolted multitudes, the cause
    Of truth.
    Milton.

  6. To sequester; to withdraw; to retire.

    [Obs.]

    An agent singling itself from consorts. Hooker.

  7. The reeled filaments of silk, twisted without doubling to give them firmness.
  8. Hence, unmarried; as, a single man or woman.

    Grows, lives, and dies in single blessedness. Shak.

    Single chose to live, and shunned to wed. Dryden.

  9. To take alone, or one by one.

    Men . . . commendable when they are singled. Hooker.

  10. A handful of gleaned grain.

    [Prov. Eng. *** Scot.]
  11. Not doubled, twisted together, or combined with others; as, a single thread; a single strand of a rope.
  12. A game with but one player on each side] -- usually in the plural.
  13. Performed by one person, or one on each side; as, a single combat.

    These shifts refuted, answer thy appellant, . . .
    Who now defles thee thrice ti single fight.
    Milton.

  14. A hit by a batter which enables him to reach first base only.
  15. Uncompounded; pure; unmixed.

    Simple ideas are opposed to complex, and single to compound. I. Watts.

  16. Not deceitful or artful; honest; sincere.

    I speak it with a single heart. Shak.

  17. Simple; not wise; weak; silly.

    [Obs.]

    He utters such single matter in so infantly a voice. Beau. *** Fl.

    Single ale, beer, or drink, small ale, etc., as contrasted with double ale, etc., which is stronger. [Obs.] Nares. -- Single bill (Law), a written engagement, generally under seal, for the payment of money, without a penalty. Burril. -- Single court (Lawn Tennis), a court laid out for only two players. -- Single-cut file. See the Note under 4th File. -- Single entry. See under Bookkeeping. -- Single file. See under 1st File. -- Single flower (Bot.), a flower with but one set of petals, as a wild rose. -- Single knot. See Illust. under Knot. -- Single whip (Naut.), a single rope running through a fixed block.

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Single

SIN'GLE, adjective

1. Separate; one; only; individual; consisting of one only; as a single star; a single city; a single act.

2. Particular; individual. No single man is born with a right of controlling the opinions of all the rest.

3. Uncompounded. Simple ideas are opposed to complex, and single to compound.

4. Alone; having no companion or assistant. Who single hast maintain'd against revolted multitudes the cause of truth.

5. Unmarried; as a single man; a single woman.

6. Not double; not complicated; as a single thread; a single strand of a rope.

7. Performed with one person or antagonist on a side, or with one person only opposed to another; as a single fight; a single combat.

8. Pure; simple; incorrupt; unbiased; having clear vision of divine truth. Matthew 6:22.

9. Small; weak; silly

10. In botany, a single flower is when there is only one on a stem, and in common usage, one not double.

SIN'GLE, verb transitive

1. To select, as an individual person or thing from among a number; to choose one from others. --A dog who can single out his master in the dark.

2. To sequester; to withdraw; to retire; as an agent singling itself from comforts.

3. To take alone; as men commendable when singled from society.

4. To separate.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

commune

COMMUNE, v.i.

1. To converse; to talk together familiarly; to impart sentiments mutually, in private or familiar discourse; followed by with before the person.

And there will I meet and commune with thee. Ex. 25.

2. To have intercourse in contemplation or meditation.

Commune with your own heart or your bed. Ps. 4.

3. To partake of the sacrament or Lords supper; to receive the communion; a common use of the word in America, as it is in the Welsh.

COMMUNE, n. A small territorial district in France--one of the subordinate divisions of the country introduced in the late revolution.

Communibus annis, one year with another; on an average.

Communibus locis, one place with another; on a medium.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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