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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [simple]

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simple

SIM'PLE, a. [L. simplex; sine, without and plex, plica, doubling, fold;]

1. Single; consisting of one thing; uncompounded; unmingled; uncombined with any thing else; as a simple substance; a simple idea; a simple sound.

2. Plain; artless; not given to design, stratagem or duplicity; undesigning; sincere; harmless. A simple husbandman in garments gray.

3. Artless; unaffected; unconstrained; inartificial; plain. In simple manners all the secret lies.

4. Unadorned; plain; as a simple style or narration; a simple dress.

5. Not complex or complicated; as a machine of simple construction.

6. Weak in intellect; not wise or sagacious; silly. The simple believeth every word; but the prudent looketh well to his going. Prov. 14.

7. In botany, undivided, as a root, stem or spike; only one on a petiole, as a simple leaf; only one on a peduncle, as a simple flower; having only one set of rays, as an umbel; having only one row of leaflets, as a simple calyx; not plumose or fathered, as a pappus. A simple body, in chemisty, is one that has not been decomposed, or separated into two or more bodies.

SIM'PLE, n. Something not mixed or compounded. in the materia medica, the genral denomination of an herb or plant. as each vegetable is supposed to possess its particular virtue, and therefore to constitute a simple remedy.

SIM'PLE, v. i. To gather simples or plants. As simpling on the flowery hills he stray'd.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [simple]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SIM'PLE, a. [L. simplex; sine, without and plex, plica, doubling, fold;]

1. Single; consisting of one thing; uncompounded; unmingled; uncombined with any thing else; as a simple substance; a simple idea; a simple sound.

2. Plain; artless; not given to design, stratagem or duplicity; undesigning; sincere; harmless. A simple husbandman in garments gray.

3. Artless; unaffected; unconstrained; inartificial; plain. In simple manners all the secret lies.

4. Unadorned; plain; as a simple style or narration; a simple dress.

5. Not complex or complicated; as a machine of simple construction.

6. Weak in intellect; not wise or sagacious; silly. The simple believeth every word; but the prudent looketh well to his going. Prov. 14.

7. In botany, undivided, as a root, stem or spike; only one on a petiole, as a simple leaf; only one on a peduncle, as a simple flower; having only one set of rays, as an umbel; having only one row of leaflets, as a simple calyx; not plumose or fathered, as a pappus. A simple body, in chemisty, is one that has not been decomposed, or separated into two or more bodies.

SIM'PLE, n. Something not mixed or compounded. in the materia medica, the genral denomination of an herb or plant. as each vegetable is supposed to possess its particular virtue, and therefore to constitute a simple remedy.

SIM'PLE, v. i. To gather simples or plants. As simpling on the flowery hills he stray'd.


SIM'PLE, a. [Fr. from L. simplex; sine, without, and plex, plica, doubling, fold; It. semplice.]

  1. Single; consisting of one thing; uncompounded; unmingled; uncombined with any thing else; as, a simple substance; a simple idea; a simple sound. – Watts.
  2. Plain; artless; not given to design, stratagem, or duplicity; undesigning; sincere; harmless. A simple husbandman in garments gray. – Hubberd.
  3. Artless; unaffected; unconstrained; inartificial; plain. In simple manners all the secret lies. – Young.
  4. Unadorned; plain; as, a simple style or narration; a simple dress.
  5. Not complex or complicated; as, a machine of simple construction.
  6. Weak in intellect; not wise or sagacious; silly. The simple believeth every word; but the prudent looketh well to his going. – Prov. xiv.
  7. In botany, undivided, as a root, stem, or spike; only one on a petiole, as a simple leaf; only one on a peduncle, as a simple flower; having only one set of rays, as an umbel; having only one series of leaflets, as, a simple calyx; not plumose or feathered, as a pappus. – Martyn. A simple body, in chimistry, is one that has not been decomposed, or separated into two or more bodies.

SIM'PLE, n.

Something not mixed or compounded. In the materia medica, the general denomination of an herb or plant, as each vegetable is supposed to possess its particular virtue, and therefore to constitute a simple remedy. Simple, when applied to minerals and rocks, has reference to their homogeneousness, and not to the number of elements which enter into their composition. – Encyc. Dryden.


SIM'PLE, v.i.

To gather simples or plants. As simpling on the flowery hills he stray'd. – Garth.


Sim"ple
  1. Single; not complex; not infolded or entangled; uncombined; not compounded; not blended with something else; not complicated; as, a simple substance; a simple idea; a simple sound; a simple machine; a simple problem; simple tasks.
  2. Something not mixed or compounded.

    "Compounded of many simples." Shak.
  3. To gather simples, or medicinal plants.

    As simpling on the flowery hills she [Circe] strayed. Garth.

  4. Plain; unadorned; as, simple dress.

    "Simple truth." Spenser. "His simple story." Burns.
  5. A medicinal plant; -- so called because each vegetable was supposed to possess its particular virtue, and therefore to constitute a simple remedy.

    What virtue is in this remedy lies in the naked simple itself as it comes over from the Indies. Sir W. Temple.

  6. Mere; not other than; being only.

    A medicine . . . whose simple touch
    Is powerful to araise King Pepin.
    Shak.

  7. A drawloom.

    (b)
  8. Not given to artifice, stratagem, or duplicity; undesigning; sincere; true.

    Full many fine men go upon my score, as simple as I stand here, and I trust them. Marston.

    Must thou trust Tradition's simple tongue? Byron.

    To be simple is to be great. Emerson.

  9. A feast which is not a double or a semidouble.
  10. Artless in manner; unaffected; unconstrained; natural; inartificial;; straightforward.

    In simple manners all the secret lies. Young.

  11. Direct; clear; intelligible; not abstruse or enigmatical; as, a simple statement; simple language.
  12. Weak in intellect; not wise or sagacious; of but moderate understanding or attainments; hence, foolish; silly.

    "You have simple wits." Shak.

    The simple believeth every word; but the prudent man looketh well to his going. Prov. xiv. 15.

  13. Not luxurious; without much variety; plain; as, a simple diet; a simple way of living.

    Thy simple fare and all thy plain delights. Cowper.

  14. Humble; lowly; undistinguished.

    A simple husbandman in garments gray. Spenser.

    Clergy and laity, male and female, gentle and simple made the fuel of the same fire. Fuller.

  15. Without subdivisions; entire; as, a simple stem; a simple leaf.
  16. Not capable of being decomposed into anything more simple or ultimate by any means at present known; elementary; thus, atoms are regarded as simple bodies. Cf. Ultimate, a.

    * A simple body is one that has not as yet been decomposed. There are indications that many of our simple elements are still compound bodies, though their actual decomposition into anything simpler may never be accomplished.

  17. Homogenous.
  18. Consisting of a single individual or zooid; as, a simple ascidian; -- opposed to compound.

    Simple contract (Law), any contract, whether verbal or written, which is not of record or under seal. J. W. Smith. Chitty. -- Simple equation (Alg.), an equation containing but one unknown quantity, and that quantity only in the first degree. -- Simple eye (Zoöl.), an eye having a single lens; -- opposed to compound eye. -- Simple interest. See under Interest. -- Simple larceny. (Law) See under Larceny. -- Simple obligation (Rom. Law), an obligation which does not depend for its execution upon any event provided for by the parties, or is not to become void on the happening of any such event. Burrill.

    Syn. -- Single; uncompounded; unmingled; unmixed; mere; uncombined; elementary; plain; artless; sincere; harmless; undesigning; frank; open; unaffected; inartificial; unadorned; credulous; silly; foolish; shallow; unwise. -- Simple, Silly. One who is simple is sincere, unaffected, and inexperienced in duplicity, -- hence liable to be duped. A silly person is one who is ignorant or weak and also self- confident; hence, one who shows in speech and act a lack of good sense. Simplicity is incompatible with duplicity, artfulness, or vanity, while silliness is consistent with all three. Simplicity denotes lack of knowledge or of guile; silliness denotes want of judgment or right purpose, a defect of character as well as of education.

    I am a simple woman, much too weak
    To oppose your cunning.
    Shak.

    He is the companion of the silliest people in their most silly pleasure; he is ready for every impertinent entertainment and diversion. Law.

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Simple

SIM'PLE, adjective [Latin simplex; sine, without and plex, plica, doubling, fold; ]

1. Single; consisting of one thing; uncompounded; unmingled; uncombined with any thing else; as a simple substance; a simple idea; a simple sound.

2. Plain; artless; not given to design, stratagem or duplicity; undesigning; sincere; harmless. A simple husbandman in garments gray.

3. Artless; unaffected; unconstrained; inartificial; plain. In simple manners all the secret lies.

4. Unadorned; plain; as a simple style or narration; a simple dress.

5. Not complex or complicated; as a machine of simple construction.

6. Weak in intellect; not wise or sagacious; silly. The simple believeth every word; but the prudent looketh well to his going. Proverbs 14:15.

7. In botany, undivided, as a root, stem or spike; only one on a petiole, as a simple leaf; only one on a peduncle, as a simple flower; having only one set of rays, as an umbel; having only one row of leaflets, as a simple calyx; not plumose or fathered, as a pappus. A simple body, in chemisty, is one that has not been decomposed, or separated into two or more bodies.

SIM'PLE, noun Something not mixed or compounded. in the materia medica, the genral denomination of an herb or plant. as each vegetable is supposed to possess its particular virtue, and therefore to constitute a simple remedy.

SIM'PLE, verb intransitive To gather simples or plants. As simpling on the flowery hills he stray'd.

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This dictionary is important as it helps me better comprehend the Word of God.

— Tonya (Albuquerque, NM)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

intermeddle

INTERMED'DLE, v.i. [inter and meddle.] To meddle in the affairs of others, in which one has no concern; to meddle officiously; to interpose or interfere improperly.

The practice of Spain has been, by war and by conditions of treaty, to intermeddle with foreign states.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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