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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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show

SHOW, v.t. pret. showed; pp. shown or showed. It is sometimes written shew, shewed, shewn. [If the radical letter lost was a labial, show coincides with the Gr.]

1. To exhibit or present to the view of others.

Go thy way, show thyself to the priest. Matt. 8.

2. To afford to the eye or to notice; to contain in a visible form.

Nor want we skill o rart, from whence to raise

Magnificence; and what can heaven show more? Milton.

3. To make or enable to see.

4. To make or enable to perceive.

5. To make to know; to cause to understand; to make known; to teach or inform.

Know, I am sent

To show thee what shall come in future days. Milton.

6. To prove; to manifest.

I'll show my duty by my timely care. Dryden.

7. T oinform; to teach; with of.

The time cometh when I shall no more speak to you in proverbs, but I shall show you plainly of the Father. John 16.

8. To point out, as a guide.

Thou shalt show them th eway in which they must walk. Ex. 18.

9. To bestow; to confer; to afford; as, to show favor or mercy on any person.

10. To prove by evidence, testimony or authentic registers or documents.

They could not show their father's house. Ezra 2.

11. To disclose; to make known.

I durst not show mine opinion. Job. 32.

12. To discover; to explain; as, to show a dream or interpretation.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [show]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SHOW, v.t. pret. showed; pp. shown or showed. It is sometimes written shew, shewed, shewn. [If the radical letter lost was a labial, show coincides with the Gr.]

1. To exhibit or present to the view of others.

Go thy way, show thyself to the priest. Matt. 8.

2. To afford to the eye or to notice; to contain in a visible form.

Nor want we skill o rart, from whence to raise

Magnificence; and what can heaven show more? Milton.

3. To make or enable to see.

4. To make or enable to perceive.

5. To make to know; to cause to understand; to make known; to teach or inform.

Know, I am sent

To show thee what shall come in future days. Milton.

6. To prove; to manifest.

I'll show my duty by my timely care. Dryden.

7. T oinform; to teach; with of.

The time cometh when I shall no more speak to you in proverbs, but I shall show you plainly of the Father. John 16.

8. To point out, as a guide.

Thou shalt show them th eway in which they must walk. Ex. 18.

9. To bestow; to confer; to afford; as, to show favor or mercy on any person.

10. To prove by evidence, testimony or authentic registers or documents.

They could not show their father's house. Ezra 2.

11. To disclose; to make known.

I durst not show mine opinion. Job. 32.

12. To discover; to explain; as, to show a dream or interpretation.


SHOW, n.

  1. Superficial appearance; not reality. Mild heav'n / Disapproves that care, though wise in show. – Milton.
  2. A spectacle; something offered to view for money. Addison.
  3. Ostentatious display or parade. I envy none their pageantry and show. – Young.
  4. Appearance as an object of notice. The city itself makes the noblest show of any in the world. – Addison.
  5. Public appearance, in distinction from concealment; as, an open show.
  6. Semblance; likeness. In show plebeian angel militant. – Milton.
  7. Speciousness; plausibility. But a short exile must for show precede. – Dryden.
  8. External appearance. And forc'd, at least in show, to prize it more. – Dryden.
  9. Exhibition to view; as, a show of cattle, or cattle-show. – Agricult. Societies.
  10. Pomp; magnificent spectacle. As for triumph; masks, feasts, and such shows … – Bacon.
  11. A phantom; as, a fairy show. – Dryden.
  12. Representative action; as, a dumb show. – Addison.
  13. External appearance; hypocritical pretense. Who devour widows' houses, and for a show make long prayers. – Luke xx.

SHOW, v.i.

  1. To appear; to look; to be in appearance. Just such she shows before a rising storm. – Dryden.
  2. To have appearance; to become or suit well or ill. My lord of York, it better show'd with you. [Obs.] – Shak.

SHOW, v.t. [pret. showed; pp. shown or showed. It is sometimes written shew, shewed, shewn. Sax. sceawian; D. schouwen; G. schauen; Dan. skuer. This word in most of the Teutonic dialects, signifies merely to look, see, view, behold. In Saxon it signifies to show, look, view, explore, regard. This is doubtless a contracted word. If the radical letter lost was a labial, show coincides with the Gr. σκοπεω, σκεπτομαι. If a dental has been lost, this word accords with the Sw. skåda, to view or behold.]

  1. To exhibit or present to the view of others. Go thy way, show thyself to the priest. Matth. viii.
  2. To afford to the eye or to notice; to contain in a visible form. Nor want we skill or art, from whence to raise / Magnificence; and what can heaven show more? – Milton.
  3. To make or enable to see. – Milton.
  4. To make or enable to perceive. – Milton.
  5. To make to know; to cause to understand; to make known to; to teach or inform. – Job x. Know, I am sent / To show thee what shall come in future days. – Milton.
  6. To prove; to manifest. I'll shove my duty by my timely care. – Dryden.
  7. To inform; to teach; with of. The time cometh when I shall no more speak to you in proverbs, but I shall show you plainly of the Father. – John xvi.
  8. To point out, as a guide. Thou shalt show them the way in which they must walk. – Exod. xviii.
  9. To bestow; to confer; to afford; as, to show favor or mercy on any person. – Ps. cxii. 5.
  10. To prove by evidence, testimony or authentic registers or documents. They could not show their father's house. – Ezra ii.
  11. To disclose; to make known. I durst not show you mine opinion. – Job xxxii.
  12. To discover; to explain; as, to show a dream or interpretation. – Dan. ii. To show forth, to manifest; to publish; to proclaim. – 1 Pet. ii.

Show
  1. To exhibit or present to view; to place in sight; to display; -- the thing exhibited being the object, and often with an indirect object denoting the person or thing seeing or beholding; as, to show a house; show your colors; shopkeepers show customers goods (show goods to customers).

    Go thy way, shew thyself to the priest. Matt. viii. 4.

    Nor want we skill or art from whence to raise
    Magnificence; and what can heaven show more?
    Milton.

  2. To exhibit or manifest one's self or itself; to appear; to look; to be in appearance; to seem.

    Just such she shows before a rising storm. Dryden.

    All round a hedge upshoots, and shows
    At distance like a little wood.
    Tennyson.

  3. The act of showing, or bringing to view; exposure to sight; exhibition.
  4. To exhibit to the mental view; to tell; to disclose; to reveal; to make known; as, to show one's designs.

    Shew them the way wherein they must walk. Ex. xviii. 20.

    If it please my father to do thee evil, then I will shew it thee, and send thee away. 1 Sam. xx. 13.

  5. To have a certain appearance, as well or ill, fit or unfit; to become or suit; to appear.

    My lord of York, it better showed with you. Shak.

    To show off, to make a show; to display one's self.

  6. That which os shown, or brought to view; that which is arranged to be seen; a spectacle; an exhibition; as, a traveling show; a cattle show.

    As for triumphs, masks, feasts, and such shows. Bacon.

  7. Specifically, to make known the way to (a person); hence, to direct; to guide; to asher; to conduct; as, to show a person into a parlor; to show one to the door.
  8. Proud or ostentatious display; parade; pomp.

    I envy none their pageantry and show. Young.

  9. To make apparent or clear, as by evidence, testimony, or reasoning; to prove; to explain; also, to manifest; to evince; as, to show the truth of a statement; to show the causes of an event.

    I 'll show my duty by my timely care. Dryden.

  10. Semblance; likeness; appearance.

    He through the midst unmarked,
    In show plebeian angel militant
    Of lowest order, passed.
    Milton.

  11. To bestow; to confer; to afford; as, to show favor.

    Shewing mercy unto thousands of them that love me. Ex. xx. 6.

    To show forth, to manifest; to publish; to proclaim. -- To show his paces, to exhibit the gait, speed, or the like; -- said especially of a horse. -- To show off, to exhibit ostentatiously. -- To show up, to expose. [Colloq.]

  12. False semblance; deceitful appearance; pretense.

    Beware of the scribes, . . . which devour widows' houses, and for a shew make long prayers. Luke xx. 46. 47.

  13. A discharge, from the vagina, of mucus streaked with blood, occuring a short time before labor.
  14. A pale blue flame, at the top of a candle flame, indicating the presence of fire damp.

    Raymond.

    Show bill, a broad sheet containing an advertisement in large letters. -- Show box, a box xontaining some object of curiosity carried round as a show. -- Show card, an advertising placard; also, a card for displaying samples. -- Show case, a gla(?)ed case, box, or cabinet for displaying and protecting shopkeepers' wares, articles on exhibition in museums, etc. -- Show glass, a glass which displays objects; a mirror. -- Show of hands, a raising of hands to indicate judgment; as, the vote was taken by a show of hands. -- Show stone, a piece of glass or crystal supposed to have the property of exhibiting images of persons or things not present, indicating in that way future events.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Show

SHOW, verb transitive preterit tense showed; participle passive shown or showed. It is sometimes written shew, shewed, shewn. [If the radical letter lost was a labial, show coincides with the Gr.]

1. To exhibit or present to the view of others.

Go thy way, show thyself to the priest. Matthew 8:1.

2. To afford to the eye or to notice; to contain in a visible form.

Nor want we skill o rart, from whence to raise

Magnificence; and what can heaven show more? Milton.

3. To make or enable to see.

4. To make or enable to perceive.

5. To make to know; to cause to understand; to make known; to teach or inform.

Know, I am sent

To show thee what shall come in future days. Milton.

6. To prove; to manifest.

I'll show my duty by my timely care. Dryden.

7. T oinform; to teach; with of.

The time cometh when I shall no more speak to you in proverbs, but I shall show you plainly of the Father. John 16:1.

8. To point out, as a guide.

Thou shalt show them th eway in which they must walk. Exodus 18:1.

9. To bestow; to confer; to afford; as, to show favor or mercy on any person.

10. To prove by evidence, testimony or authentic registers or documents.

They could not show their father's house. Ezra 2:1.

11. To disclose; to make known.

I durst not show mine opinion. Job 32:1.

12. To discover; to explain; as, to show a dream or interpretation.

To show forth, to manifest; to publish; to proclaim.

SHOW, verb intransitive

1. To appear; to look; to be in appearance.

Just such she shows before a rising storm. Dryden.

2. To have appearance; to become or suit well or ill.

My lord of York, it better show'd with you. Obs. Shak.

SHOW, noun

1. Superficial appearance; not reality.

Mild heav'n

Disapproves that care, though wise in show. Milton.

2. A spectacle; something offered to view for money.

3. Ostentatious display or parade.

I envy none their pageantry and show. Young.

4. Appearance as an object of notice.

The city itself makes the noblest showof any in the world. Addison.

5. Public appearance, in distinction of concealment; as an open show.

6. Semblance; likeness.

In show plebeian angel militant. Milton.

7. Seciousness; plausibility.

But a short exile must for show precede. Dryden.

8. External appearance.

And forc'd, at least in show, to prize it more. Dryden.

9. Exhibition in view; as a show o fcattle, or cattle-show.

10. Pomp; magnificent spectacle.

As for triumphs, masks, feasts, and such shows- Bacon.

11. A phantom; as a fairy show.

12. Representative action; as a dumb show.

13. External appearance; hypocritical pretense.

Who devour widows' houses, and for a show make long prayers. Luke 20:1.

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The meanings of the words have been preserved to their original meanings. Kept close and referenced to the Bible.

— Kelly (San Antonio, TX)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

preen

PREEN, n. A forked instrument used by clothiers in dressing cloth.

PREEN, v.t. To clean, compose and dress the feathers, as fowls, to enable them to glide more easily through the air or water. For this purpose they are furnished with two glands on their rump, which secrete an oily substance into a bag, from which they draw it with the bill and spread it over their feathers.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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