HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Tuesday - November 12, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [shed]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

shed

SHED, v.t. pret. and pp. shed.

1. To pour out; to effuse; to spill; to suffer to flow out; as, to shed tears; to shed blood. The sun sheds light on the earth; the stars shed a more feeble light.

This is my blood of the New Testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins. Matt. 26.

2. To let fall; to cast; as, the trees shed their leaves on autumn; fowls shed their fethers; and serpents shed their skin.

3. To scatter to emit; to throw off; to diffuse; as, flowers shed their sweets of fragrance.

SHED, v.i. To let fall its parts.

White oats are apt to shed most as they lie, and black as they stand.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [shed]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SHED, v.t. pret. and pp. shed.

1. To pour out; to effuse; to spill; to suffer to flow out; as, to shed tears; to shed blood. The sun sheds light on the earth; the stars shed a more feeble light.

This is my blood of the New Testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins. Matt. 26.

2. To let fall; to cast; as, the trees shed their leaves on autumn; fowls shed their fethers; and serpents shed their skin.

3. To scatter to emit; to throw off; to diffuse; as, flowers shed their sweets of fragrance.

SHED, v.i. To let fall its parts.

White oats are apt to shed most as they lie, and black as they stand.


SHED, n. [Sax. sced, a shade; Sw. skydd, a defense; skydda, to protect, to defend or shelter; Dan. skytter, id.; skytter, a shooter; skyts, a defense; skyt, a gun; skyder, to shoot; G. schützen, to defend; schütze, a shooter; D. schutten, to defend, to parry or stop; schutter, a shooter. It appears that shed, the noun and verb, and shoot, are from one source, and shade, scud, scath, and several other words, when traced, all terminate in the same radical sense, to thrust, rush or drive.]

  1. A slight building; a covering of timber and boards, &c: for shelter against rain and the inclemencies of weather; a poor house or hovel; as, a horse-shed. The first Aletes born in lowly shed. – Fairfax. Sheds of reeds which summer's heat repel. – Sandys.
  2. In composition, effusion; as in blood-shed. [See the Verb.]

SHED, v.i.

To let fall its parts. White oats are apt to shed most as they lie, and black as they stand. – Mortimer.


SHED, v.t.1 [pret. and pp. shed. Sax. scedan, to pour out. If s is a prefix, this word coincides in elements with D. gieten, to pour, to cast, G. giessen, Eng. gush. It coincides also in elements with shoot. See the Noun.]

  1. To cause or stiffer to flow out; as, to shed tears; to shed blood. The sun sheds light on the earth; the stars shed a more feeble light. This is my blood of the New Testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins. – Matth. xxvi.
  2. To let fall; to cast; as the trees shed their leaves in autumn; fowls shed their feathers; and serpents shed their skin.
  3. To scatter; to emit; to throw off; to diffuse; as, flowers shed their sweets or fragrance. [The peculiar sense of this word is to cast off something that belongs to the body, either a substance or a quality. Applied to animals and plants, it expresses a periodical casting off of a natural covering.]

SHED, v.t.2

To keep off; to prevent from entering; as a hut, umbrella or garment that sheds rain.


Shed
  1. A slight or temporary structure built to shade or shelter something; a structure usually open in front; an outbuilding; a hut; as, a wagon shed; a wood shed.

    The first Aletes born in lowly shed. Fairfax.

    Sheds of reeds which summer's heat repel. Sandys.

  2. To separate; to divide.

    [Obs. or Prov. Eng.] Robert of Brunne.
  3. To fall in drops; to pour.

    [Obs.]

    Such a rain down from the welkin shadde. Chaucer.

  4. A parting; a separation; a division.

    [Obs. or Prov. Eng.]

    They say also that the manner of making the shed of newwedded wives' hair with the iron head of a javelin came up then likewise. Sir T. North.

  5. A covered structure for housing aircraft; a hangar.
  6. To part with; to throw off or give forth from one's self; to emit; to diffuse; to cause to emanate or flow; to pour forth or out; to spill; as, the sun sheds light; she shed tears; the clouds shed rain.

    Did Romeo's hand shed Tybalt's blood? Shak.

    Twice seven consenting years have shed
    Their utmost bounty on thy head.
    Wordsworth.

  7. To let fall the parts, as seeds or fruit; to throw off a covering or envelope.

    White oats are apt to shed most as they lie, and black as they stand. Mortimer.

  8. The act of shedding or spilling; -- used only in composition, as in bloodshed.
  9. To let fall; to throw off, as a natural covering of hair, feathers, shell; to cast; as, fowls shed their feathers; serpents shed their skins; trees shed leaves.
  10. That which parts, divides, or sheds; -- used in composition, as in watershed.
  11. To cause to flow off without penetrating; as, a tight roof, or covering of oiled cloth, sheeds water.
  12. The passageway between the threads of the warp through which the shuttle is thrown, having a sloping top and bottom made by raising and lowering the alternate threads.
  13. To sprinkle; to intersperse; to cover.

    [R.] "Her hair . . . is shed with gray." B. Jonson.
  14. To divide, as the warp threads, so as to form a shed, or passageway, for the shuttle.
1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

87

648

70

697

101

692
Shed

SHED, verb transitive preterit tense and participle passive shed.

1. To pour out; to effuse; to spill; to suffer to flow out; as, to shed tears; to shed blood. The sun sheds light on the earth; the stars shed a more feeble light.

This is my blood of the New Testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins. Matthew 26:28.

2. To let fall; to cast; as, the trees shed their leaves on autumn; fowls shed their fethers; and serpents shed their skin.

3. To scatter to emit; to throw off; to diffuse; as, flowers shed their sweets of fragrance.

SHED, verb intransitive To let fall its parts.

White oats are apt to shed most as they lie, and black as they stand.

Mortimer.

SHED, noun

1. A slight building; a covering of timber and boards, etc. for shelter against and the inclemencies of weather; a poop house or hovel; as a horse-shed.

The first Aletes born in a lowly shed. Fairfax.

Sheds of reeds which summer's heat repel. Sandys.

2. In composition; effusion; as in slood-shed. [See the Verb.]

SHED, verb transitive To keep off; to prevent from entering; as a hut, umbrella or garment that sheds rain.

Why 1828?

1
3
 


I want to understand the original meaning usage intent of particular words. Thanks.

— David (Hinesville, GA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

perambulation

PERAMBULA'TION,n. The act of passing or walking through or over.

1. A traveling survey or inspection.

2. A district within which a person has the right of inspection; jurisdiction.

3. Annual survey of the bounds of a parish in England, or of a township in America.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

187

354

Compact Edition

147

123

CD-ROM

116

96

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.286 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top