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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [shark]

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shark

SH'ARK, n. [L. carcharius; Gr. from sharp.]

1. A voracious fish of the genus Squalus, of several species. The body is oblong, tapering and rough, and some species have several rows of serrated teeth. The largest grow to the length of thirty feet.

2. A greedy artful fellow; one who fills his pockets by sly tricks. [Low.]

3. Trick; fraud; petty rapine; as, to live upon the shark. [Little used.]

4. In New England, one that lives by shifts, contrivance or stratagem.

SH'ARK, v.t. To pick up hastily, slily or in small quantities. [Low.]

SH'ARK, v.i.

1. To play the petty thief; or rather to live by shifts and petty stratagems. [In New England, the common pronunciation is shurk, but the word rarely implies fraud.]

2. To cheat; to trick. [Low.]

3. To fawn upon for a dinner; to beg.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [shark]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SH'ARK, n. [L. carcharius; Gr. from sharp.]

1. A voracious fish of the genus Squalus, of several species. The body is oblong, tapering and rough, and some species have several rows of serrated teeth. The largest grow to the length of thirty feet.

2. A greedy artful fellow; one who fills his pockets by sly tricks. [Low.]

3. Trick; fraud; petty rapine; as, to live upon the shark. [Little used.]

4. In New England, one that lives by shifts, contrivance or stratagem.

SH'ARK, v.t. To pick up hastily, slily or in small quantities. [Low.]

SH'ARK, v.i.

1. To play the petty thief; or rather to live by shifts and petty stratagems. [In New England, the common pronunciation is shurk, but the word rarely implies fraud.]

2. To cheat; to trick. [Low.]

3. To fawn upon for a dinner; to beg.


SHARK, n. [L. carcharias; Gr. καρχαριας, from καρχαρος, sharp; Corn. skarkias.]

  1. A family of voracious cartilaginous fishes of several genera, as Squalus, Carcharies, Scyllium, &c. The body is oblong, tapering and rough, and some species have several rows of serrated teeth. The largest grow to the length of thirty feet.
  2. A greedy artful fellow; one who fills his pockets by sly tricks. [Low.] – South.
  3. Trick; fraud; petty rapine; as, to live upon the shark. [Little used.] – South.
  4. In New England, one that lives by shifts, contrivance or stratagem.

SHARK, v.i.

  1. To play the petty thief; or rather to live by shifts and petty stratagems. [In New England, the common pronunciation is shurk, but the word rarely implies fraud.]
  2. To cheat; to trick. [Low.] – Ainsworth.
  3. To fawn upon for a dinner; to beg. Johnson. To shark out, to slip out or escape by low artifices. [Vulgar.]

SHARK, v.t.

To pick up hastily, slily or in small quantities. [Low.] – Shak.


Shark
  1. Any one of numerous species of elasmobranch fishes of the order Plagiostomi, found in all seas.

    * Some sharks, as the basking shark and the whale shark, grow to an enormous size, the former becoming forty feet or more, and the latter sixty feet or more, in length. Most of them are harmless to man, but some are exceedingly voracious. The man-eating sharks mostly belong to the genera Carcharhinus, Carcharodon, and related genera. They have several rows of large sharp teeth with serrated edges, as the great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias, or Rondeleti) of tropical seas, and the great blue shark (Carcharhinus glaucus) of all tropical and temperate seas. The former sometimes becomes thirty-six feet long, and is the most voracious and dangerous species known. The rare man-eating shark of the United States coast (Charcarodon Atwoodi) is thought by some to be a variety, or the young, of C. carcharias. The dusky shark (Carcharhinus obscurus), and the smaller blue shark (C. caudatus), both common species on the coast of the United States, are of moderate size and not dangerous. They feed on shellfish and bottom fishes.

  2. To pick or gather indiscriminately or covertly.

    [Obs.] Shak.
  3. To play the petty thief] to practice fraud or trickery; to swindle.

    Neither sharks for a cup or a reckoning. Bp. Earle.

  4. A rapacious, artful person; a sharper.

    [Colloq.]
  5. To live by shifts and stratagems.

    Beau. *** Fl.
  6. Trickery; fraud; petty rapine; as, to live upon the shark.

    [Obs.] South.

    Baskin shark, Liver shark, Nurse shark, Oil shark, Sand shark, Tiger shark, etc. See under Basking, Liver, etc. See also Dogfish, Houndfish, Notidanian, and Tope. -- Gray shark, the sand shark. -- Hammer-headed shark. See Hammerhead. -- Port Jackson shark. See Cestraciont. -- Shark barrow, the eggcase of a shark; a sea purse. -- Shark ray. Same as Angel fish (a), under Angel. -- Thrasher shark, or Thresher shark, a large, voracious shark. See Thrasher. -- Whale shark, a huge harmless shark (Rhinodon typicus) of the Indian Ocean. It becomes sixty feet or more in length, but has very small teeth.

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Shark

SH'ARK, noun [Latin carcharius; Gr. from sharp.]

1. A voracious fish of the genus Squalus, of several species. The body is oblong, tapering and rough, and some species have several rows of serrated teeth. The largest grow to the length of thirty feet.

2. A greedy artful fellow; one who fills his pockets by sly tricks. [Low.]

3. Trick; fraud; petty rapine; as, to live upon the shark. [Little used.]

4. In New England, one that lives by shifts, contrivance or stratagem.

SH'ARK, verb transitive To pick up hastily, slily or in small quantities. [Low.]

SH'ARK, verb intransitive

1. To play the petty thief; or rather to live by shifts and petty stratagems. [In New England, the common pronunciation is shurk, but the word rarely implies fraud.]

2. To cheat; to trick. [Low.]

3. To fawn upon for a dinner; to beg.

To shark out, to slip out or escape by low artifices. [Vulgar.]

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Scripture Study

— Greg (Henderson, NV)

Word of the Day

am

AMB,AM. About; around; used in composition. Gr., Lat. am or amb.

Random Word

forbid

FORBID', v.t. pret. forbad; pp. forbid, forbidden. Literally, to bid or command against. Hence,

1. To prohibit; to interdict; to command to forbear or not to do. The laws of God forbid us to swear. Good manners also forbid us to use profane language. All servile labor and idle amusements on the sabbath are forbidden.

2. To command not to enter; as, I have forbid him my house or presence. This phrase seems to be elliptical; to forbid from entering or approaching.

3. To oppose; to hinder; to obstruct. An impassable river forbids the approach of the army.

A blaze of glory that forbids the sight.

4. To accurse; to blast. Obs.

FORBID', v.i. To utter a prohibition; but in the intransitive form, there is always an ellipsis. I would go, but my state of health forbids, that is, forbids me to go, or my going.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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