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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [self]

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self

SELF, a. or pron. plu. selves; used chiefly in composition.

1. In old authors, this sometimes signifies particular, very, or same. "And on tham sylfan geare;" in that same year, that very year. Sax. Chron. A.D. 1052, 1061.

Shoot another arrow that self way. Shak.

On these self hills. Raleigh.

At that self moment enters Palamon. Dryden.

In this sense, self is an adjective, and is now obsolete, except when followed by same; as on the self-same day; the self-same hour; the self-same thing; which is tautology.

2. In present usage, selfis united to certain personal pronouns and pronominal adjectives, to express emphasis or distinction; also when the pronoun is used reciprocally. thus, for emphasis, I myself will write; I will examine for myself; Thou thyself shalt go; thou shalt see for thyself; You yourself shall write; you shall see for yourself. He himself shall write; he shall examine for himself. She herself shall write; she shall examine for herself. The child itself shall be carried; it shall be present itself.

Reciprocally, I abhor myself; thou enrichest thyself; he loves himself; she admires herself; it pleases itself; we value ourselves; ye hurry yourselves; they see themselves. I did not hurt him, he hurt himself; he did not hurt me, I hurt myself.

Except when added to pronouns used reciprocally, self serves to give emphasis to the pronoun, or to render the distinction expressed by it more emphatical. "I myself will decide," not only expresses my determination to decide, but the determination that no other shall decide.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [self]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SELF, a. or pron. plu. selves; used chiefly in composition.

1. In old authors, this sometimes signifies particular, very, or same. "And on tham sylfan geare;" in that same year, that very year. Sax. Chron. A.D. 1052, 1061.

Shoot another arrow that self way. Shak.

On these self hills. Raleigh.

At that self moment enters Palamon. Dryden.

In this sense, self is an adjective, and is now obsolete, except when followed by same; as on the self-same day; the self-same hour; the self-same thing; which is tautology.

2. In present usage, selfis united to certain personal pronouns and pronominal adjectives, to express emphasis or distinction; also when the pronoun is used reciprocally. thus, for emphasis, I myself will write; I will examine for myself; Thou thyself shalt go; thou shalt see for thyself; You yourself shall write; you shall see for yourself. He himself shall write; he shall examine for himself. She herself shall write; she shall examine for herself. The child itself shall be carried; it shall be present itself.

Reciprocally, I abhor myself; thou enrichest thyself; he loves himself; she admires herself; it pleases itself; we value ourselves; ye hurry yourselves; they see themselves. I did not hurt him, he hurt himself; he did not hurt me, I hurt myself.

Except when added to pronouns used reciprocally, self serves to give emphasis to the pronoun, or to render the distinction expressed by it more emphatical. "I myself will decide," not only expresses my determination to decide, but the determination that no other shall decide.


SELF, a. [or pron. Plur. Selves; used chiefly in composition. Sax. self, sylf; Goth. silba; Sw. sielf; Dan. selv; G. selbst; D. zelf. I know not the primary sense of this word; most probably it is to set or unite, or to separate from others: See Selvedge.]

  1. In old authors, this word sometimes signifies particular, very or same. “And on tham sylfan geare;” in that same Year, that very year. Sax. Chron. A. D. 1052, 1061. Shoot another arrow that self way. – Shak. On these self hills. – Ralegh. At that self moment enters Palamon. – Dryden. In this sense, self is an adjective, and is now obsolete, except when followed by same; as, on the self-same day; the self-same hour; the self-same thing; which to tautology. – Matth. viii.
  2. In present usage, self is united to certain personal pronouns and pronominal adjectives, to express emphasis or distinction; also when the pronoun is used reciprocally. Thus for emphasis, I myself will write; I will examine for myself. Thou thyself shalt go; thou shalt see for thyself. You yourself shall write; you shall see for yourself. He himself shall write; he shall examine for himself. She herself shall write; she shall examine for herself. The child itself shall be carried; it shall be present itself. Reciprocally, I abhor myself; thou enrichest thyself; he loves himself; she admires herself; it pleases itself; we value ourselves; ye hurry yourselves; they see themselves. I did not hurt him, he hurt himself; he did not hurt me, I hurt myself. Except when added to pronouns used reciprocally, self serves to give emphasis to the pronoun, or to render the distinction expressed by it more emphatical. "I myself will decide," not only expresses my determination to decide, but the determination that no other shall decide. Himself, herself, themselves, are used in the nominative case, as well as in the objective. Jesus himself baptized not, but his disciples. – John iv. See Matth. xxiii, 4.
  3. Self is sometimes used as a noun, noting the individual subject to his own contemplation or action, or noting identity of person. Consciousness makes every one to be what he calls self. A man's self may be the worst fellow to converse within / the world. – Pope.
  4. It also signifies personal interest, or love of private interest; selfishness. The fondness we have for self … furnishes another long rank of prejudices. – Watts. Self is much used in composition.

Self
  1. Same; particular; very; identical.

    [Obs., except in the compound selfsame.] "On these self hills." Sir. W. Raleigh.

    To shoot another arrow that self way
    Which you did shoot the first.
    Shak.

    At that self moment enters Palamon. Dryden.

  2. The individual as the object of his own reflective consciousness; the man viewed by his own cognition as the subject of all his mental phenomena, the agent in his own activities, the subject of his own feelings, and the possessor of capacities and character; a person as a distinct individual; a being regarded as having personality.

    "Those who liked their real selves." Addison.

    A man's self may be the worst fellow to converse with in the world. Pope.

    The self, the I, is recognized in every act of intelligence as the subject to which that act belongs. It is I that perceive, I that imagine, I that remember, I that attend, I that compare, I that feel, I that will, I that am conscious. Sir W. Hamilton.

  3. Having its own or a single nature or character, as in color, composition, etc., without addition or change; unmixed; as, a self bow, one made from a single piece of wood; self flower or plant, one which is wholly of one color; self-colored.
  4. Hence, personal interest, or love of private interest; selfishness; as, self is his whole aim.
  5. Personification; embodiment.

    [Poetic.]

    She was beauty's self. Thomson.

    * Self is united to certain personal pronouns and pronominal adjectives to express emphasis or distinction. Thus, for emphasis; I myself will write; I will examine for myself; thou thyself shalt go; thou shalt see for thyself; you yourself shall write; you shall see for yourself; he himself shall write; he shall examine for himself; she herself shall write; she shall examine for herself; the child itself shall be carried; it shall be present itself. It is also used reflexively; as, I abhor myself; thou enrichest thyself; he loves himself; she admires herself; it pleases itself; we walue ourselves; ye hurry yourselves; they see themselves. Himself, herself, themselves, are used in the nominative case, as well as in the objective. "Jesus himself baptized not, but his disciples." John iv. 2.

    * self is used in the formation of innumerable compounds, usually of obvious signification, in most of which it denotes either the agent or the object of the action expressed by the word with which it is joined, or the person in behalf of whom it is performed, or the person or thing to, for, or towards whom or which a quality, attribute, or feeling expressed by the following word belongs, is directed, or is exerted, or from which it proceeds; or it denotes the subject of, or object affected by, such action, quality, attribute, feeling, or the like; as, self-abandoning, self-abnegation, self-abhorring, self-absorbed, self-accusing, self-adjusting, self-balanced, self-boasting, self-canceled, self-combating, self-commendation, self-condemned, self-conflict, self-conquest, self-constituted, self-consumed, self-contempt, self-controlled, self-deceiving, self-denying, self-destroyed, self-disclosure, self-display, self-dominion, self-doomed, self-elected, self-evolved, self-exalting, self-excusing, self-exile, self-fed, self- fulfillment, self-governed, self-harming, self- helpless, self-humiliation, self-idolized, self- inflicted, self-improvement, self-instruction, self-invited, self-judging, self-justification, self-loathing, self-loving, self-maintenance, self-mastered, self-nourishment, self-perfect, self-perpetuation, self-pleasing, self-praising, self-preserving, self-questioned, self-relying, self-restraining, self-revelation, self-ruined, self-satisfaction, self-support, self-sustained, self-sustaining, self-tormenting, self-troubling, self-trust, self-tuition, self-upbraiding, self-valuing, self-worshiping, and many others.

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Self

SELF, adjective. or pron. plural selves; used chiefly in composition.

1. In old authors, this sometimes signifies particular, very, or same. 'And on tham sylfan geare; ' in that same year, that very year. Sax. Chron. adjective D. 1052, 1061.

Shoot another arrow that self way. Shak.

On these self hills. Raleigh.

At that self moment enters Palamon. Dryden.

In this sense, self is an adjective, and is now obsolete, except when followed by same; as on the self-same day; the self-same hour; the self-same thing; which is tautology.

2. In present usage, selfis united to certain personal pronouns and pronominal adjectives, to express emphasis or distinction; also when the pronoun is used reciprocally. thus, for emphasis, I myself will write; I will examine for myself; Thou thyself shalt go; thou shalt see for thyself; You yourself shall write; you shall see for yourself. He himself shall write; he shall examine for himself. She herself shall write; she shall examine for herself. The child itself shall be carried; it shall be present itself.

Reciprocally, I abhor myself; thou enrichest thyself; he loves himself; she admires herself; it pleases itself; we value ourselves; ye hurry yourselves; they see themselves. I did not hurt him, he hurt himself; he did not hurt me, I hurt myself.

Except when added to pronouns used reciprocally, self serves to give emphasis to the pronoun, or to render the distinction expressed by it more emphatical. 'I myself will decide, ' not only expresses my determination to decide, but the determination that no other shall decide.

Himself, herself, themselves, are used in the nomnative case, as well as in the objective.

Jesus himself baptized not, but his disciples. See Matthew 23:4.

3. Self is sometimes as a noun, noting the individual subject to his own contemplation or action, or noting identity of person. Consciousness makes everyone to be what he call self.

A man's self may be the worst fellow to converse with in the world. Pope.

4. It also signifies personal interest, or love of private interest; selfishness.

The fondness we have for self- furnishes anothe long rank of prejudices. Watts.

Self is much used in composition.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

metalline

MET'ALLINE, a. Pertaining to a metal; consisting of metal.

1. Impregnated with metal; as metalline water.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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