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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [seek]

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seek

SEEK, v.t. pret and pp. sought, pronounced sawt. [L. sequor, to follow; for to seek is to go after, and the primary sense is to advance, to press, to drive forward, as in the L. peto.]

1. To go in searh or quest of; to look for; to search for by going from place to place.

The man asked him, saying, what seekest thou? And he said, I seek my brethen.

Gen. 37.

2. To inquire for; to ask for; to solicit; to endeavor to find or gain by any means.

The young lions roar after their prey, and seek their meat from God. Ps. 104.

He found no place for repentance, though he sought it carefully with tears. Heb. 12




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [seek]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SEEK, v.t. pret and pp. sought, pronounced sawt. [L. sequor, to follow; for to seek is to go after, and the primary sense is to advance, to press, to drive forward, as in the L. peto.]

1. To go in searh or quest of; to look for; to search for by going from place to place.

The man asked him, saying, what seekest thou? And he said, I seek my brethen.

Gen. 37.

2. To inquire for; to ask for; to solicit; to endeavor to find or gain by any means.

The young lions roar after their prey, and seek their meat from God. Ps. 104.

He found no place for repentance, though he sought it carefully with tears. Heb. 12


SEEK, v.i.

  1. To make search or inquiry; to endeavor to make discovery. Seek ye out of the book of the Lord, and read. – Is. xxxiv.
  2. To endeavor. Ask not what pains, nor further seek to know / Their process, or the forms of law below. – Dryden. To seek after, to make pursuit; to attempt to find or take. [See No. 3, supra.] To seek for, to endeavor to find. – Knolles. To seek to, to apply to; to resort to. – 1 Kings x. To seek, at a loss; without knowledge, measures or experience. Unpractic'd, unprepar'd and still to seek. – Milton. [This phrase, I believe, is wholly obsolete.]

SEEK, v.t. [pret. and pp. sought, pronounced sawt; Sax. secan, sæcan, to seek, to come to; asecan, to require; gesecan, to seek, to come to; forsacan, forsæcan, to forsake; G. suchen, to seek; absuchen, to pick off; besuchen, to visit, to see; gesuch, suit, petition; gesuche, a continued seeking; versuchen, to try, prove, tempt, essay, strive; versuch, trial, essay; D. zoeken, to seek, to look for, to try or endeavor; bezoeken, to visit, to try; gezoek, a seeking; opzoeken, to seek; verzoeken, to request, desire, invite, try, tempt, to visit; Dan. söger, to seek, to endeavor; besöger, to visit; forsöger, to try, to essay, to experiment, to tempt; opsöger, to seek or search after; Sw. söka, to seek, to sue, to court; söka en lagligen, to sue one at law; besöka, to visit; försöka, to try, to essay, to tempt. The words all accord with L. sequor, Ir. seichim, to follow; for to seek is to go after, and the primary sense is to advance, to press, to drive forward, as in the L. peto. See Essay, from the same, root, through the Italian and French. Now in Sax. forsacan, forsæcan, is to forsake; sacan is to strive, contend, whence English sake, and sæcan, secan, is to seek. But in Swedish, försaka, to forsake, to renounce, is from sak, thing, cause, suit, Sax. saca, English sake; in Danish, forsager, to renounce, is from siger, to say; sag, a thing, cause, matter, suit; sagd; a saying; G. versagen, to deny, to renounce, from sagen, to say, to tell; D. verzaaken, to deny, to forsake, to revoke, from zaak, thing, cause, and zeggen is to say or tell, which is the Sax. secgan, to say. These close affinities prove that seek, essay, say, and L. sequor, are all from one radix; coinciding with Ch. עסק, to seek, to strive. Class Sg, No. 46, and see No. 30, Ar. The English verb see seems to be from the same root.]

  1. To go in search or quest of; to look for; to search for by going from place to place. The man asked him, saying, what seekest thou? And he said, I seek my brethren. – Gen. xxxvii.
  2. To inquire for; to ask for; to solicit; to endeavor to find or gain by any means. The young lions roar after their prey, and seek their meat from God. – Ps. civ. He found no place for repentance, though he sought it carefully with tears. – Heb. xii. Others tempting him, sought of him a sign. – Luke xi.
  3. Seek is followed sometimes by out or after. To seek out, properly implies to look for a specific thing among a number. But in general, the use of out and after with seek, is unnecessary and inelegant. To seek God, his name, or his face, in Scripture, to ask for his favor, direction and assistance. – Ps. lxiii. lxxxiii. God seeks men, when he fixes his love on them, and by his word and Spirit, and the righteousness of Christ, reclaims and recovers them from their miserable condition as sinners. – Ezek. xxxiv. Ps. cxix. Luke xv. To seek after the life, or soul, or to attempt by arts or machinations; or to attempt to destroy or ruin. – Ps. xxxv. To seek peace, or judgment, to endeavor to promote it; or to practice it. – Ps. xxxiv. Is. i. To seek an altar, temple, or habitation, to frequent it; to resort to it often. – 2 Chron. i. Amos v. To seek out God's works, to endeavor to understand them. – Ps. cxi.

Seek
  1. Sick.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.
  2. To go in search of; to look for; to search for; to try to find.

    The man asked him, saying, What seekest thou? And he said, I seek my brethren. Gen. xxxvii. 15, 16.

  3. To make search or inquiry; to endeavor to make discovery.

    Seek ye out of the book of the Lord, and read. Isa. xxxiv. 16.

    To seek, needing to seek or search; hence, unprepared. "Unpracticed, unprepared, and still to seek." Milton. [Obs.] -- To seek after, to make pursuit of; to attempt to find or take. -- To seek for, to endeavor to find. -- To seek to, to apply to; to resort to; to court. [Obs.] "All the earth sought to Solomon, to hear his wisdom." 1 Kings x. 24. -- To seek upon, to make strict inquiry after; to follow up; to persecute. [Obs.]

    To seek
    Upon a man and do his soul unrest.
    Chaucer.

  4. To inquire for; to ask for; to solicit; to beseech.

    Others, tempting him, sought of him a sign. Luke xi. 16.

  5. To try to acquire or gain; to strive after; to aim at; as, to seek wealth or fame; to seek one's life.
  6. To try to reach or come to; to go to; to resort to.

    Seek not Bethel, nor enter into Gilgal. Amos v. 5.

    Since great Ulysses sought the Phrygian plains. Pope.

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Seek

SEEK, verb transitive pret and participle passive sought, pronounced sawt. [L. sequor, to follow; for to seek is to go after, and the primary sense is to advance, to press, to drive forward, as in the L. peto.]

1. To go in searh or quest of; to look for; to search for by going from place to place.

The man asked him, saying, what seekest thou? And he said, I seek my brethen.

Genesis 37:16.

2. To inquire for; to ask for; to solicit; to endeavor to find or gain by any means.

The young lions roar after their prey, and seek their meat from God. Psalms 104:21.

He found no place for repentance, though he sought it carefully with tears. Hebrews 12:1

Others tempting him, sought of him a sign. Luke 11:9.

3.Seek is followed sometimes by out or after. To seek out, properly implies to look for a specific thing among a number. But in general, the use of out and after with seek, is unnecessary and inelegant.

To seek God, his name, or his face, in Scripture, to ask for his favor, direction and assistance. Psalms 83:16.

God seeks men, when he fixes his love on them, and by his word and Spirit, and the righteousness of Christ, reclaims and recovers them from their miserable condition as sinners.

Ezekiel 34:6. Psa 119. Luke 15:8.

To seek after the life, or soul, to attempt by arts or machinations; or to attempt to destroy or ruin. Psa 35.

To seek peace, or judgement, to endeavor to promote it; or to practice it.

Psa 34. Isaiah 1:17.

To seek an altar, temple, or habitation, to frequent it; to restore to it often.

2 Chronicles 1:1. Amos 5:4.

To seek out God's works, to endeavor to understand them. Psa 111.

SEEK, v. i.

1. To make search or inquiry; to endeavor to make discovery.

Seek ye out of the book of the Lord. Isaiah 34:16.

2. To endeavor.

Ask not what pains, nor further seek to know

Their process, or the forms of law below. Dryden.

To seek after, to make pursuit; to attempt to find or take. [See No. 3 supra.]

To seek for, to endeavor to find. Knolles.

To seek to, to apply to; to resort to. 1 Kings 10:1.

To seek, at a loss; without knowledge, measures or experience.

Unpractic'd, unprepar'd and still to seek. Milton. [This phrase, I believe, is wholly obsolete.]

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I refer to the 1828 Dictionary constantly in my classes to teach my students about the translation of ancient scripture in the 19th century.

— Prof. Pierce (Orem, UT)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

segnity

SEG'NITY, n. [from L. segnis.] Sluggishness; dullness; inactivity. [Not used.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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