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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [screw]

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screw

SCREW, n.

1. A cylinder of wood or metal, grooved spirally; or a cylinder with a spiral channel or thread cut in such a manner that it is equally inclined to the base of the cylinder throughout the whole length. A screw is male or female. In the male screw, the thread rises from the surface of the cylinder; in the female, the groove or channel is sunk below the surface to receive the thread of the male screw.

2. One of the six mechanical powers.

SCREW, v.t.

1. To turn or apply a screw to; to press, fasten or make firm by a screw; as, to screw a lock on a door; to screw a press.

2. To force; to squeeze; to press.

3. To oppress by exactions. Landlords sometimes screw and rack their tenants without mercy.

4. To deform by contortions; to distort.

He screw'd his face into a harden'd smile.

To screw out, to press out; to extort.

To screw up to force; to bring by violent pressure; as, to screw up the pins of power too high.

To screw in, to force in by turning or twisting.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [screw]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SCREW, n.

1. A cylinder of wood or metal, grooved spirally; or a cylinder with a spiral channel or thread cut in such a manner that it is equally inclined to the base of the cylinder throughout the whole length. A screw is male or female. In the male screw, the thread rises from the surface of the cylinder; in the female, the groove or channel is sunk below the surface to receive the thread of the male screw.

2. One of the six mechanical powers.

SCREW, v.t.

1. To turn or apply a screw to; to press, fasten or make firm by a screw; as, to screw a lock on a door; to screw a press.

2. To force; to squeeze; to press.

3. To oppress by exactions. Landlords sometimes screw and rack their tenants without mercy.

4. To deform by contortions; to distort.

He screw'd his face into a harden'd smile.

To screw out, to press out; to extort.

To screw up to force; to bring by violent pressure; as, to screw up the pins of power too high.

To screw in, to force in by turning or twisting.

SCREW, n. [D. schroef; G. schraube; Dan. skruve or skrue; Sw. skruf. The primary sense is probably to turn, or, rather to strain. Class Rb.]

  1. A cylinder of wood or metal, grooved spirally; or a cylinder with a spiral channel or thread cut in such a manner that is equally inclined to the base of the cylinder throughout the whole length. A screw is male or female. In the male screw, the thread rises from the surface of the cylinder; in the female, the groove or channel is sunk below the surface to receive the thread of the male screw.
  2. One of the six mechanical powers.

SCREW, v.t.

  1. To turn or apply a screw to; to press, fasten or make firm by a screw; as, to screw a lock on a door; to screw a press.
  2. To force; to squeeze; to press.
  3. To oppress by exactions. Landlords sometimes screw and rack their tenants without mercy.
  4. To deform by contortions; to distort. He screw'd his face into a harden'd smile. – Dryden. To screw out, to press out; to extort. To screw up, to force; to bring by violent pressure; as, to screw up the pins of power too high. – Howell. To screw in, to force in by turning or twisting.

Screw
  1. A cylinder, or a cylindrical perforation, having a continuous rib, called the thread, winding round it spirally at a constant inclination, so as to leave a continuous spiral groove between one turn and the next, -- used chiefly for producing, when revolved, motion or pressure in the direction of its axis, by the sliding of the threads of the cylinder in the grooves between the threads of the perforation adapted to it, the former being distinguished as the external, or male screw, or, more usually the screw; the latter as the internal, or female screw, or, more usually, the nut.

    * The screw, as a mechanical power, is a modification of the inclined plane, and may be regarded as a right-angled triangle wrapped round a cylinder, the hypotenuse of the marking the spiral thread of the screw, its base equaling the circumference of the cylinder, and its height the pitch of the thread.

  2. To turn, as a screw] to apply a screw to; to press, fasten, or make firm, by means of a screw or screws; as, to screw a lock on a door; to screw a press.
  3. To use violent mans in making exactions; to be oppressive or exacting.

    Howitt.
  4. Specifically, a kind of nail with a spiral thread and a head with a nick to receive the end of the screw-driver. Screws are much used to hold together pieces of wood or to fasten something; -- called also wood screws, and screw nails. See also Screw bolt, below.
  5. To force; to squeeze; to press, as by screws.

    But screw your courage to the sticking place,
    And we'll not fail.
    Shak.

  6. To turn one's self uneasily with a twisting motion; as, he screws about in his chair.
  7. Anything shaped or acting like a screw; esp., a form of wheel for propelling steam vessels. It is placed at the stern, and furnished with blades having helicoidal surfaces to act against the water in the manner of a screw. See Screw propeller, below.
  8. Hence: To practice extortion upon; to oppress by unreasonable or extortionate exactions.

    Our country landlords, by unmeasurable screwing and racking their tenants, have already reduced the miserable people to a worse condition than the peasants in France. swift.

  9. A steam vesel propelled by a screw instead of wheels; a screw steamer; a propeller.
  10. To twist; to distort; as, to screw his visage.

    He screwed his face into a hardened smile. Dryden.

  11. An extortioner; a sharp bargainer; a skinflint; a niggard.

    Thackeray.
  12. To examine rigidly, as a student; to subject to a severe examination.

    [Cant, American Colleges]

    To screw out, to press out; to extort. - - To screw up, to force; to bring by violent pressure. Howell. -- To screw in, to force in by turning or twisting.

  13. An instructor who examines with great or unnecessary severity; also, a searching or strict examination of a student by an instructor.

    [Cant, American Colleges]
  14. A small packet of tobacco.

    [Slang] Mayhew.
  15. An unsound or worn-out horse, useful as a hack, and commonly of good appearance.

    Ld. Lytton.
  16. A straight line in space with which a definite linear magnitude termed the pitch is associated (cf. 5th Pitch, 10 (b)). It is used to express the displacement of a rigid body, which may always be made to consist of a rotation about an axis combined with a translation parallel to that axis.
  17. An amphipod crustacean; as, the skeleton screw (Caprella). See Sand screw, under Sand.

    Archimedes screw, Compound screw, Foot screw, etc. See under Archimedes, Compound, Foot, etc. -- A screw loose, something out of order, so that work is not done smoothly; as, there is a screw loose somewhere. H. Martineau. -- Endless, or perpetual, screw, a screw used to give motion to a toothed wheel by the action of its threads between the teeth of the wheel; -- called also a worm. -- Lag screw. See under Lag. -- Micrometer screw, a screw with fine threads, used for the measurement of very small spaces. -- Right and left screw, a screw having threads upon the opposite ends which wind in opposite directions. -- Screw alley. See Shaft alley, under Shaft. -- Screw bean. (Bot.) (a) The curious spirally coiled pod of a leguminous tree (Prosopis pubescens) growing from Texas to California. It is used for fodder, and ground into meal by the Indians. (b) The tree itself. Its heavy hard wood is used for fuel, for fencing, and for railroad ties. -- Screw bolt, a bolt having a screw thread on its shank, in distinction from a key bolt. See 1st Bolt, 3. -- Screw box, a device, resembling a die, for cutting the thread on a wooden screw. -- Screw dock. See under Dock. -- Screw engine, a marine engine for driving a screw propeller. -- Screw gear. See Spiral gear, under Spiral. -- Screw jack. Same as Jackscrew. -- Screw key, a wrench for turning a screw or nut; a spanner wrench. -- Screw machine. (a) One of a series of machines employed in the manufacture of wood screws. (b) A machine tool resembling a lathe, having a number of cutting tools that can be caused to act on the work successively, for making screws and other turned pieces from metal rods. -- Screw pine (Bot.), any plant of the endogenous genus Pandanus, of which there are about fifty species, natives of tropical lands from Africa to Polynesia; -- named from the spiral arrangement of the pineapple-like leaves. -- Screw plate, a device for cutting threads on small screws, consisting of a thin steel plate having a series of perforations with internal screws forming dies. -- Screw press, a press in which pressure is exerted by means of a screw. -- Screw propeller, a screw or spiral bladed wheel, used in the propulsion of steam vessels; also, a steam vessel propelled by a screw. -- Screw shell (Zoöl.), a long, slender, spiral gastropod shell, especially of the genus Turritella and allied genera. See Turritella. -- Screw steamer, a steamship propelled by a screw. -- Screw thread, the spiral rib which forms a screw. -- Screw stone (Paleon.), the fossil stem of an encrinite. -- Screw tree (Bot.), any plant of the genus Helicteres, consisting of about thirty species of tropical shrubs, with simple leaves and spirally twisted, five-celled capsules; -- also called twisted-horn, and twisty. -- Screw valve, a stop valve which is opened or closed by a screw. -- Screw worm (Zoöl.), the larva of an American fly (Compsomyia macellaria), allied to the blowflies, which sometimes deposits its eggs in the nostrils, or about wounds, in man and other animals, with fatal results. -- Screw wrench. (a) A wrench for turning a screw. (b) A wrench with an adjustable jaw that is moved by a screw. -- To put the screw, or screws, on, to use pressure upon, as for the purpose of extortion; to coerce. -- To put under the screw or screws, to subject to pressure; to force. -- Wood screw, a metal screw with a sharp thread of coarse pitch, adapted to holding fast in wood. See Illust. of Wood screw, under Wood.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Screw

SCREW, noun

1. A cylinder of wood or metal, grooved spirally; or a cylinder with a spiral channel or thread cut in such a manner that it is equally inclined to the base of the cylinder throughout the whole length. A screw is male or female. In the male screw the thread rises from the surface of the cylinder; in the female, the groove or channel is sunk below the surface to receive the thread of the male screw

2. One of the six mechanical powers.

SCREW, verb transitive

1. To turn or apply a screw to; to press, fasten or make firm by a screw; as, to screw a lock on a door; to screw a press.

2. To force; to squeeze; to press.

3. To oppress by exactions. Landlords sometimes screw and rack their tenants without mercy.

4. To deform by contortions; to distort.

He screw'd his face into a harden'd smile.

To screw out, to press out; to extort.

To screw up to force; to bring by violent pressure; as, to screw up the pins of power too high.

To screw in, to force in by turning or twisting.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

martyr

M`ARTYR, n. [Gr. a witness.] One who, by his death, bears witness to the truth of the gospel. Stephen was the first christian martyr.

To be a martyr signifies only to witness the truth of Christ.

1. One who suffers death in defense of any cause. We say, a man dies a martyr to his political principles or to the cause of liberty.

M`ARTYR, v.t. To put to death for adhering to what one believes to be the truth; to sacrifice one on account of his faith or profession.

1. To murder; to destroy.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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