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Monday - July 6, 2020

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [scratch]

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scratch

SCRATCH, v.t. [L. rado.]

1. To rub and tear the surface of any thing with something sharp or ragged; as, to scratch the cheeks with the nails; to scratch the earth with a rake; to scratch the hands or face by riding or running among briers.

A sort of small sand-colored stones, so hard as to scratch glass.

2. To wound slightly.

3. To rub with the nails.

Be mindful, when invention fails, to scratch your head and bite your nails.

4. To write or draw awkwardly; as, to scratch out a pamphlet. [Not in use.]

5. To dig or excavate with the claws. Some animals scratch holes in which they burrow.

To scratch out, to ease; to rub out; to obliterate.

SCRATCH, v.i. To use the claws in tearing the surface. The gallinaceous hen scratches for her chickens.

- Dull tame things that will neither bite nor scratch.

SCRATCH, n.

1. A rent; a break in the surface of a thing made by scratching, or by rubbing with any thing pointed or ragged; as a scratch on timber or glass.

The coarse file - makes deep scratches in the work.

These nails with scratches shall deform my breast.

2. A slight wound.

Heav'n forbid a shallow scratch should drive the prince of Wales from such a field as this.

3. A kind of wig worn for covering baldness or gray hairs, or for other purpose.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [scratch]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SCRATCH, v.t. [L. rado.]

1. To rub and tear the surface of any thing with something sharp or ragged; as, to scratch the cheeks with the nails; to scratch the earth with a rake; to scratch the hands or face by riding or running among briers.

A sort of small sand-colored stones, so hard as to scratch glass.

2. To wound slightly.

3. To rub with the nails.

Be mindful, when invention fails, to scratch your head and bite your nails.

4. To write or draw awkwardly; as, to scratch out a pamphlet. [Not in use.]

5. To dig or excavate with the claws. Some animals scratch holes in which they burrow.

To scratch out, to ease; to rub out; to obliterate.

SCRATCH, v.i. To use the claws in tearing the surface. The gallinaceous hen scratches for her chickens.

- Dull tame things that will neither bite nor scratch.

SCRATCH, n.

1. A rent; a break in the surface of a thing made by scratching, or by rubbing with any thing pointed or ragged; as a scratch on timber or glass.

The coarse file - makes deep scratches in the work.

These nails with scratches shall deform my breast.

2. A slight wound.

Heav'n forbid a shallow scratch should drive the prince of Wales from such a field as this.

3. A kind of wig worn for covering baldness or gray hairs, or for other purpose.

SCRATCH, n.

  1. A rent; a break in the surface of a thing made by scratching, or by rubbing with any thing pointed or ragged; as, a scratch on timber or glass. The coarse file … makes deep scratches in the work. – Moxon. These nails with scratches shall deform my breast. – Prior.
  2. A slight wound. Heav'n forbid a shallow scratch should drive / The prince of Wales from such a field as this. – Shak.
  3. A kind of wig worn for covering baldness or gray hairs, or for other purpose. – Smollet.

SCRATCH, v.i.

To use the claws in tearing the surface. The gallinaceous hen scratches for her chickens. Dull tame things that will neither bite nor scratch. – More.


SCRATCH, v.t. [G. kratzen, ritzen, kritzeln; D. kratsen; Sw. kratsa; Dan. kradser; probably from the root of grate, and L. rado. See Class Rd, No. 46, 49, 56, 58, 59.]

  1. To rub and tear the surface of any thing with something sharp or ragged; as, to scratch the cheeks with the nails; to scratch the earth with a rake; to scratch the hands or face by riding or running among briers. A sort of small sand-colored stones, so hard as to scratch glass. – Grew.
  2. To wound slightly.
  3. To rub with the nails. Be mindful, when invention fails, / To scratch your head and bite your nails. – Swift.
  4. To write or draw awkwardly; as, to scratch out a pamphlet. [Not in use.] – Swift.
  5. To dig or excavate with the claws. Some animals scratch holes in which they burrow. To scratch out, to erase; to rub out; to obliterate.

Scratch
  1. To rub and tear or mark the surface of with something sharp or ragged; to scrape, roughen, or wound slightly by drawing something pointed or rough across, as the claws, the nails, a pin, or the like.

    Small sand-colored stones, so hard as to scratch glass. Grew.

    Be mindful, when invention fails,
    To scratch your head, and bite your nails.
    Swift.

  2. To use the claws or nails in tearing or in digging; to make scratches.

    Dull, tame things, . . . that will neither bite nor scratch. Dr. H. More.

  3. A break in the surface of a thing made by scratching, or by rubbing with anything pointed or rough; a slight wound, mark, furrow, or incision.

    The coarse file . . . makes deep scratches in the work. Moxon.

    These nails with scratches deform my breast. Prior.

    God forbid a shallow scratch should drive
    The prince of Wales from such a field as this.
    Shak.

  4. Made, done, or happening by chance; arranged with little or no preparation; determined by circumstances; haphazard; as, a scratch team; a scratch crew for a boat race; a scratch shot in billiards.

    [Slang]

    Scratch race, one without restrictions regarding the entrance of competitors; also, one for which the competitors are chosen by lot.

  5. In various sports, the line from which the start is made, except in the case of contestants receiving a distance handicap.
  6. To write or draw hastily or awkwardly.

    "Scratch out a pamphlet." Swift.
  7. To score, not by skillful play but by some fortunate chance of the game.

    [Cant, U. S.]
  8. A line across the prize ring; up to which boxers are brought when they join fight; hence, test, trial, or proof of courage; as, to bring to the scratch; to come up to the scratch.

    [Cant] Grose.
  9. To cancel by drawing one or more lines through, as the name of a candidate upon a ballot, or of a horse in a list; hence, to erase; to efface; -- often with out.
  10. Minute, but tender and troublesome, excoriations, covered with scabs, upon the heels of horses which have been used where it is very wet or muddy.

    Law (Farmer's Veter. Adviser).
  11. To dig or excavate with the claws; as, some animals scratch holes, in which they burrow.

    To scratch a ticket, to cancel one or more names of candidates on a party ballot; to refuse to vote the party ticket in its entirety. [U. S.]

  12. A kind of wig covering only a portion of the head.
  13. A shot which scores by chance and not as intended by the player; a fluke.

    [Cant, U. S.]

    Scratch cradle. See Cratch cradle, under Cratch. -- Scratch grass (Bot.), a climbing knotweed (Polygonum sagittatum) with a square stem beset with fine recurved prickles along the angles. -- Scratch wig. Same as Scratch, 4, above. Thackeray.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Scratch

SCRATCH, verb transitive [Latin rado.]

1. To rub and tear the surface of any thing with something sharp or ragged; as, to scratch the cheeks with the nails; to scratch the earth with a rake; to scratch the hands or face by riding or running among briers.

A sort of small sand-colored stones, so hard as to scratch glass.

2. To wound slightly.

3. To rub with the nails.

Be mindful, when invention fails, to scratch your head and bite your nails.

4. To write or draw awkwardly; as, to scratch out a pamphlet. [Not in use.]

5. To dig or excavate with the claws. Some animals scratch holes in which they burrow.

To scratch out, to ease; to rub out; to obliterate.

SCRATCH, verb intransitive To use the claws in tearing the surface. The gallinaceous hen scratches for her chickens.

- Dull tame things that will neither bite nor scratch

SCRATCH, noun

1. A rent; a break in the surface of a thing made by scratching, or by rubbing with any thing pointed or ragged; as a scratch on timber or glass.

The coarse file - makes deep scratches in the work.

These nails with scratches shall deform my breast.

2. A slight wound.

Heav'n forbid a shallow scratch should drive the prince of Wales from such a field as this.

3. A kind of wig worn for covering baldness or gray hairs, or for other purpose.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

putredinous

PUTRED'INOUS, a. [from L. putredo, from putreo, putris.]

Proceeding from putrefaction, or partaking of the putrefactive process; having an offensive smell.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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