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Wednesday - September 18, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [scorpion]

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scorpion

SCOR'PION, n. [L. scorpio; Gr. probably altered from the Oriental.]

1. In zoology, an insect of the genus Scorpio, or rather the genus itself, containing several species, natives of southern or warm climates. This animal has eight feet, two claws in front, eight eyes, three on each side of the thorax and two on the back, and a long jointed tail ending in a pointed weapon or sting. It is found in the south of Europe, where it seldom exceeds four inches in length. In tropical climates, it grows to a foot in length, and resembles a lobster. The sting of this animal is sometimes fatal to life.

2. In Scripture, a painful scourge; a kind of whip armed with points like a scorpion's tail. 1Kings 12.

Malicious and crafty men, who delight in injuring others, are compared to scorpions. Ezek. 2.

3. In astronomy, the eighth sign of the zodiac, which the sun enters, Oct. 23.

4. A sea fish. [L. scorpius.]

Water scorpion, an aquatic insect of the genus Nepa.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [scorpion]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SCOR'PION, n. [L. scorpio; Gr. probably altered from the Oriental.]

1. In zoology, an insect of the genus Scorpio, or rather the genus itself, containing several species, natives of southern or warm climates. This animal has eight feet, two claws in front, eight eyes, three on each side of the thorax and two on the back, and a long jointed tail ending in a pointed weapon or sting. It is found in the south of Europe, where it seldom exceeds four inches in length. In tropical climates, it grows to a foot in length, and resembles a lobster. The sting of this animal is sometimes fatal to life.

2. In Scripture, a painful scourge; a kind of whip armed with points like a scorpion's tail. 1Kings 12.

Malicious and crafty men, who delight in injuring others, are compared to scorpions. Ezek. 2.

3. In astronomy, the eighth sign of the zodiac, which the sun enters, Oct. 23.

4. A sea fish. [L. scorpius.]

Water scorpion, an aquatic insect of the genus Nepa.

SCOR'PI-ON, n. [Fr. from L. scorpio; Gr. σκορπιος; probably altered from the Oriental עקרב. The Arabic verb to which this word belongs, signifies to wound, to strike, &c.]

  1. The popular English name of any species of scorpio, which is a genus of pedipalpous pulmonary arachnids. Scorpions have an elongated body, suddenly terminated by a long slender tail formed of six joints, the last of which terminates in an arcuated and very acute sting, which effuses a venomous liquid. This sting gives rise to excruciating pain, but is unattended either with redness or swelling, except in the axillary or inguinal glands, when an extremity is affected. It is seldom, if ever, destructive of life. Scorpions are found in the south of Europe, in Africa, in the East Indies, and in South America. The number of species is not accurately determined.
  2. In Scripture, a painful scourge; a kind of whip armed with points like a scorpion's tail. – 1 Kings xii. Malicious and crafty men, who delight in injuring others, are compared to scorpions. – Ezek. ii.
  3. In astronomy, the eighth sign of the zodiac, which the sun enters Oct. 23.
  4. A sea fish. [L. scorpius.] – Ainsworth. Water scorpion, an aquatic insect of the genus Nepa.

Scor"pi*on
  1. Any one of numerous species of pulmonate arachnids of the order Scorpiones, having a suctorial mouth, large claw-bearing palpi, and a caudal sting.

    * Scorpions have a flattened body, and a long, slender post- abdomen formed of six movable segments, the last of which terminates in a curved venomous sting. The venom causes great pain, but is unattended either with redness or swelling, except in the axillary or inguinal glands, when an extremity is affected. It is seldom if ever destructive of life. Scorpions are found widely dispersed in the warm climates of both the Old and New Worlds.

  2. The pine or gray lizard (Sceloporus undulatus).

    [Local, U. S.]
  3. The scorpene.
  4. A painful scourge.

    My father hath chastised you with whips, but I will chastise you with scorpions. 1 Kings xii. 11.

  5. A sign and constellation. See Scorpio.
  6. An ancient military engine for hurling stones and other missiles.

    Book scorpion. (Zoöl.) See under Book. -- False scorpion. (Zoöl.) See under False, and Book scorpion. -- Scorpion bug, or Water scorpion (Zoöl.) See Nepa. -- Scorpion fly (Zoöl.), a neuropterous insect of the genus Panorpa. See Panorpid. -- Scorpion grass (Bot.), a plant of the genus Myosotis. M. palustris is the forget-me-not. -- Scorpion senna (Bot.), a yellow-flowered leguminous shrub (Coronilla Emerus) having a slender joined pod, like a scorpion's tail. The leaves are said to yield a dye like indigo, and to be used sometimes to adulterate senna. -- Scorpion shell (Zoöl.), any shell of the genus Pteroceras. See Pteroceras. -- Scorpion spiders. (Zoöl.), any one of the Pedipalpi. -- Scorpion's tail (Bot.), any plant of the leguminous genus Scorpiurus, herbs with a circinately coiled pod; -- also called caterpillar. -- Scorpion's thorn (Bot.), a thorny leguminous plant (Genista Scorpius) of Southern Europe. -- The Scorpion's Heart (Astron.), the star Antares in the constellation Scorpio.

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Scorpion

SCOR'PION, noun [Latin scorpio; Gr. probably altered from the Oriental.]

1. In zoology, an insect of the genus Scorpio, or rather the genus itself, containing several species, natives of southern or warm climates. This animal has eight feet, two claws in front, eight eyes, three on each side of the thorax and two on the back, and a long jointed tail ending in a pointed weapon or sting. It is found in the south of Europe, where it seldom exceeds four inches in length. In tropical climates, it grows to a foot in length, and resembles a lobster. The sting of this animal is sometimes fatal to life.

2. In Scripture, a painful scourge; a kind of whip armed with points like a scorpion's tail. 1 Kings 12:11.

Malicious and crafty men, who delight in injuring others, are compared to scorpions. Ezekiel 2:6.

3. In astronomy, the eighth sign of the zodiac, which the sun enters, Oct. 23.

4. A sea fish. [Latin scorpius.]

Water scorpion an aquatic insect of the genus Nepa.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

under

UNDER, prep.

1. Beneath; below; so as to have something over or above. He stood under a tree; the carriage is under cover. We may see things under water; we have a cellar under the whole house.

2. In a state of pupilage or subjection; as a youth under a tutor; a ward under a guardian; colonies under the British government.

I also am a man under authority, having soldiers under me. Matt. 8.

3. In a less degree than. The effect of medicine is sometimes under and sometimes above or over its natural strength.

4. For less than. He would not sell the horse under forty pounds.

5. Less than; below. There are parishes in England under forty pounds a year.

6. With the pretense of; with the cover or pretext of. He does this under the name of love. This argument is not to be evaded under some plausible distinction.

7. With less than.

Several young men could never leave the pulpit under half a dozen conceits.

8. In a degree, state or rank inferior to.

It was too great an honor for any man under a duke.

9. In a state of being loaded; in a state of bearing or being burdened; as, to travel under a heavy load; to live under extreme oppression.

10. In a state of oppression or subjection to, the state in which a person is considered as bearing or having any thing laid upon him; as, to have fortitude under the evils of life; to have patience under pain, or under misfortunes; to behave like a christian under reproaches and injuries.

11. In a state of liability or obligation. No man shall trespass but under the pains and penalties of the law. Attend to the conditions under which you enter upon your office. We are under the necessity of obeying the laws. Nuns are under vows of chastity. We all lie under the curse of the law, until redeemed by Christ.

12. In the state of bearing and being known by; as men trading under the firm of Wright & Co.

13. In the state of; in the enjoyment or possession of. We live under the gospel dispensation.

14. During the time of. The American revolution commenced under the administration of lord North.

15. Not having reached or arrived to; below. He left three sons under age.

16. Represented by; in the form of. Morpheus is represented under the figure of a boy asleep. [But morph, in Ethiopic, signifies cessation, rest.]

17. In the state of protection or defense. Under favor of the prince, our author was promoted. The enemy landed under cover of their batteries.

18. As bearing a particular character.

The duke may be mentioned under the double capacity of a poet and a divine.

19. Being contained or comprehended in.

Under this head may be mentioned the contests between the popes and the secular princes.

20. Attested by; signed by. Here is a deed under his hand and seal.

He has left us evidence under his own hand.

21. In a state of being handled, treated or discussed, or of being the subject of. The bill is now under discussion. We shall have the subject under consideration next week.

22. In subordination to. Under God, this is our only safety.

23. In subjection or bondage to; ruled or influenced by; in a moral sense; within the dominion of.

They are all under sin. Rom. 3.

Under a signature, bearing, as a name or title.

Under way, in seamen's language, moving; in a condition to make progress.

To keep under, to hold in subjection or control; to restrain.

I keep under my body. 1Cor. 9.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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