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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [school]

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school

SCHOOL, n. [L. schola; Gr. leisure, vacation from business, lucubration at leisure, a place where leisure is enjoyed, a school. The adverb signifies at ease, leisurely, slowly, hardly, with labor or difficulty. I think, must have been derived from the Latin. This word seems originally to have denoted leisure, freedom from business, a time given to sports, games or exercises, and afterwards time given to literary studies. the sense of a crowd, collection or shoal, seems to be derivative.]

1. A place or house in which persons are instructed in arts, science, languages or any species of learning; or the pupils assembled for instruction. In American usage, school more generally denotes the collective body of pupils in any place of instruction, and under the direction and discipline of one or more teachers. Thus we say, a school consists of fifty pupils. The preceptor has a large school, or a small school. His discipline keeps the school well regulated and quiet.

2. The instruction or exercises of a collection of pupils or students, or the collective body of pupils while engaged in their studies. Thus we say, the school begins or opens at eight o'clock, that is, the pupils at that hour begin their studies. so we say, the teacher is now in school, the school hours are from nine to twelve, and from two to five.

3. The state of instruction.

Set him betimes to school.

4. A place of education, or collection of pupils, of any kind; as the schools of the prophets. In modern usage, the word school comprehends every place of education, as university, college, academy, common or primary schools, dancing schools, riding schools, &c.; but ordinarily the word is applied to seminaries inferior to universities and colleges.

What is the great community of christians, but one of the innumerable schools in the vast plan, which God has instituted for the education of various intelligences?

5. Separate denomination or sect; or a system of doctrine taught by particular teachers, or peculiar to any denomination of christians or philosophers.

Let no man be less confident in his faith - by reason of any difference in the several schools of christians -

Thus we say, the Socratic school, the Platonic school, the Peripatetic or Ionic school; by which we understand all those who adopted and adhered to a particular system of opinions.

6. The seminaries for teaching logic, metaphysics and theology, which were formed in the middle ages, and which were characterized by academical disputations and subtilties of reasoning; or the learned men who were engaged in discussing nice points in metaphysics or theology.

The supreme authority of Aristotle in the schools of theology as well as of philosophy -

Hence, school divinity is the divinity which discusses nice points, and proves every thing by argument.

7. Any place of improvement or learning. The world is an excellent school to wise men, but a school of vice to fools.

SCHOOL, v.t.

1. To instruct; to train; to educate.

He's gentle, never school'd, yet learn'd.

2. To teach with superiority; to tutor; to chide and admonish; to reprove.

School your child, and ask why God's anointed he revil'd.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [school]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SCHOOL, n. [L. schola; Gr. leisure, vacation from business, lucubration at leisure, a place where leisure is enjoyed, a school. The adverb signifies at ease, leisurely, slowly, hardly, with labor or difficulty. I think, must have been derived from the Latin. This word seems originally to have denoted leisure, freedom from business, a time given to sports, games or exercises, and afterwards time given to literary studies. the sense of a crowd, collection or shoal, seems to be derivative.]

1. A place or house in which persons are instructed in arts, science, languages or any species of learning; or the pupils assembled for instruction. In American usage, school more generally denotes the collective body of pupils in any place of instruction, and under the direction and discipline of one or more teachers. Thus we say, a school consists of fifty pupils. The preceptor has a large school, or a small school. His discipline keeps the school well regulated and quiet.

2. The instruction or exercises of a collection of pupils or students, or the collective body of pupils while engaged in their studies. Thus we say, the school begins or opens at eight o'clock, that is, the pupils at that hour begin their studies. so we say, the teacher is now in school, the school hours are from nine to twelve, and from two to five.

3. The state of instruction.

Set him betimes to school.

4. A place of education, or collection of pupils, of any kind; as the schools of the prophets. In modern usage, the word school comprehends every place of education, as university, college, academy, common or primary schools, dancing schools, riding schools, &c.; but ordinarily the word is applied to seminaries inferior to universities and colleges.

What is the great community of christians, but one of the innumerable schools in the vast plan, which God has instituted for the education of various intelligences?

5. Separate denomination or sect; or a system of doctrine taught by particular teachers, or peculiar to any denomination of christians or philosophers.

Let no man be less confident in his faith - by reason of any difference in the several schools of christians -

Thus we say, the Socratic school, the Platonic school, the Peripatetic or Ionic school; by which we understand all those who adopted and adhered to a particular system of opinions.

6. The seminaries for teaching logic, metaphysics and theology, which were formed in the middle ages, and which were characterized by academical disputations and subtilties of reasoning; or the learned men who were engaged in discussing nice points in metaphysics or theology.

The supreme authority of Aristotle in the schools of theology as well as of philosophy -

Hence, school divinity is the divinity which discusses nice points, and proves every thing by argument.

7. Any place of improvement or learning. The world is an excellent school to wise men, but a school of vice to fools.

SCHOOL, v.t.

1. To instruct; to train; to educate.

He's gentle, never school'd, yet learn'd.

2. To teach with superiority; to tutor; to chide and admonish; to reprove.

School your child, and ask why God's anointed he revil'd.

SCHOOL, n. [L. schola; Gr. σχολη, leisure, vacation from business, lucubration at leisure, a place where leisure is enjoyed, a school. The adverb signifies at ease, leisurely, slowly, hardly, with labor or difficulty. In Sax. sceol is a crowd, a multitude, a school, (shoal,) as of fishes, and a school for instruction. So also scol, scolu, a school; but the latter sense, I think, must have been derived from the Latin. D. school, an academy and a crowd; schoolen, to flock together; G. schule, a school for instruction; D. skole; Sw. skola; W. ysgol; Arm. scol; Fr. ecole; It. scuola; Sp. escuela; Port. escola; Sans. schala. This word seems originally to have denoted leisure, freedom from business, a time given to sports, games, or exercises, and afterward time given to literary studies. The sense of a crowd, collection, or shoal, seems to be derivative.]

  1. A place or house in which persons are instructed in arts, science, languages, or any species of learning; or the pupils assembled for instruction. In American usage, school more generally denotes the collective body of pupils in any place of instruction, and under the direction and discipline of one or more teachers. Thus we say, a school consists of fifty pupils. The preceptor has a large school, or a small school. His discipline keeps the school well regulated and quiet.
  2. The instruction or exercises of a collection of pupils or; students, or the collective body of pupils while engaged in their studies. Thus we say, the school begins or opens at eight o'clock, that is, the pupils at that hour begin their studies. So we say, the teacher is now in school, the school hours are from nine to twelve, and from two to five.
  3. The state of instruction. Set him betimes to school. – Dryden.
  4. A place of education, or collection of pupils, of any kind; as, the school of the prophets. In modern usage, the word school comprehends every place of education, as university, college, academy, common or primary schools, dancing-schools, riding-schools, &c.; but ordinarily the word is applied to seminaries inferior to universities and colleges. What is the great community of Christians, but one of the innumerable schools in the vast plan, which God has instituted for the education of various intelligences. – Buckminster.
  5. Separate denomination or sect; or a system of doctrine taught by particular teachers, or peculiar to any denomination of Christians or philosophers. Let no man be less confident in his faith … by reason of any difference in the several schools of Christians. – Taylor. Thus we say, the Socratic school, the Platonic school, the Peripatetic or Ionic school; by which we understand all those who adopted and adhered to a particular system of opinions.
  6. The seminaries for teaching logic, metaphysics, and theology, which were formed in the middle ages, and which were characterized by academical disputations and subtilties of reasoning; or the learned men who were engaged in discussing nice points in metaphysics or theology. The supreme authority of Aristotle in the schools of theology as well as of philosophy. – Henry. Hence, school divinity is the divinity which discusses nice points, and proves every thing by argument.
  7. Any place of improvement or learning. The world is an excellent school to wise men, but a school of vice to fools. Primary school, a school for instructing children in the first rudiments of language and literature; called also common school, because ii is open to the children of all the inhabitants in a town or district.

SCHOOL, v.t.

  1. To instruct; to train; to educate. He's gentle, never school'd, yet learn'd. – Shak.
  2. To teach with superiority; to tutor; to chide and admonish; to reprove. School your child, / And ask why God's anointed he revil'd. – Dryden.

School
  1. A shoal; a multitude; as, a school of fish.
  2. A place for learned intercourse and instruction; an institution for learning; an educational establishment; a place for acquiring knowledge and mental training; as, the school of the prophets.

    Disputing daily in the school of one Tyrannus. Acts xix. 9.

  3. To train in an institution of learning] to educate at a school; to teach.

    He's gentle, never schooled, and yet learned. Shak.

  4. A place of primary instruction; an establishment for the instruction of children; as, a primary school; a common school; a grammar school.

    As he sat in the school at his primer. Chaucer.

  5. To tutor; to chide and admonish; to reprove; to subject to systematic discipline; to train.

    It now remains for you to school your child,
    And ask why God's Anointed be reviled.
    Dryden.

    The mother, while loving her child with the intensity of a sole affection, had schooled herself to hope for little other return than the waywardness of an April breeze. Hawthorne.

  6. A session of an institution of instruction.

    How now, Sir Hugh! No school to- day? Shak.

  7. One of the seminaries for teaching logic, metaphysics, and theology, which were formed in the Middle Ages, and which were characterized by academical disputations and subtilties of reasoning.

    At Cambridge the philosophy of Descartes was still dominant in the schools. Macaulay.

  8. The room or hall in English universities where the examinations for degrees and honors are held.
  9. An assemblage of scholars; those who attend upon instruction in a school of any kind; a body of pupils.

    What is the great community of Christians, but one of the innumerable schools in the vast plan which God has instituted for the education of various intelligences? Buckminster.

  10. The disciples or followers of a teacher; those who hold a common doctrine, or accept the same teachings; a sect or denomination in philosophy, theology, science, medicine, politics, etc.

    Let no man be less confident in his faith . . . by reason of any difference in the several schools of Christians. Jer. Taylor.

  11. The canons, precepts, or body of opinion or practice, sanctioned by the authority of a particular class or age; as, he was a gentleman of the old school.

    His face pale but striking, though not handsome after the schools. A. S. Hardy.

  12. Figuratively, any means of knowledge or discipline; as, the school of experience.

    Boarding school, Common school, District school, Normal school, etc. See under Boarding, Common, District, etc. -- High school, a free public school nearest the rank of a college. [U. S.] -- School board, a corporation established by law in every borough or parish in England, and elected by the burgesses or ratepayers, with the duty of providing public school accommodation for all children in their district. -- School committee, School board, an elected committee of citizens having charge and care of the public schools in any district, town, or city, and responsible for control of the money appropriated for school purposes. [U. S.] -- School days, the period in which youth are sent to school. -- School district, a division of a town or city for establishing and conducting schools. [U.S.] -- Sunday school, or Sabbath school, a school held on Sunday for study of the Bible and for religious instruction; the pupils, or the teachers and pupils, of such a school, collectively.

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School

SCHOOL, noun [Latin schola; Gr. leisure, vacation from business, lucubration at leisure, a place where leisure is enjoyed, a school The adverb signifies at ease, leisurely, slowly, hardly, with labor or difficulty. I think, must have been derived from the Latin. This word seems originally to have denoted leisure, freedom from business, a time given to sports, games or exercises, and afterwards time given to literary studies. the sense of a crowd, collection or shoal, seems to be derivative.]

1. A place or house in which persons are instructed in arts, science, languages or any species of learning; or the pupils assembled for instruction. In American usage, school more generally denotes the collective body of pupils in any place of instruction, and under the direction and discipline of one or more teachers. Thus we say, a school consists of fifty pupils. The preceptor has a large school or a small school His discipline keeps the school well regulated and quiet.

2. The instruction or exercises of a collection of pupils or students, or the collective body of pupils while engaged in their studies. Thus we say, the school begins or opens at eight o'clock, that is, the pupils at that hour begin their studies. so we say, the teacher is now in school the school hours are from nine to twelve, and from two to five.

3. The state of instruction.

Set him betimes to school

4. A place of education, or collection of pupils, of any kind; as the schools of the prophets. In modern usage, the word school comprehends every place of education, as university, college, academy, common or primary schools, dancing schools, riding schools, etc.; but ordinarily the word is applied to seminaries inferior to universities and colleges.

What is the great community of christians, but one of the innumerable schools in the vast plan, which God has instituted for the education of various intelligences?

5. Separate denomination or sect; or a system of doctrine taught by particular teachers, or peculiar to any denomination of christians or philosophers.

Let no man be less confident in his faith - by reason of any difference in the several schools of christians -

Thus we say, the Socratic school the Platonic school the Peripatetic or Ionic school; by which we understand all those who adopted and adhered to a particular system of opinions.

6. The seminaries for teaching logic, metaphysics and theology, which were formed in the middle ages, and which were characterized by academical disputations and subtilties of reasoning; or the learned men who were engaged in discussing nice points in metaphysics or theology.

The supreme authority of Aristotle in the schools of theology as well as of philosophy -

Hence, school divinity is the divinity which discusses nice points, and proves every thing by argument.

7. Any place of improvement or learning. The world is an excellent school to wise men, but a school of vice to fools.

SCHOOL, verb transitive

1. To instruct; to train; to educate.

He's gentle, never school'd, yet learn'd.

2. To teach with superiority; to tutor; to chide and admonish; to reprove.

SCHOOL your child, and ask why God's anointed he revil'd.

SCHOOL'-BOY, noun [See boy.] A boy belonging to a school or one who is learning rudiments.

SCHOOL'-DAME, noun [See Dame.] The female teacher of a school

SCHOOL'-DAY, noun [See Day.] The age in which youth are sent to school [Not now used.]

SCHOOL'-DISTRICT, noun A division of a town or city for establishing and conducting school [United States.]

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I am impressed by the fact that he uses so much scripture in expressing the use of given words. He was a very well versed and a true wordsmith.

— JG (Rainbow City, AL)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

fiercely

FIERCELY, adv. fers'ly.

1. Violently; furiously; with rage; as, both sides fiercely fought.

2. With a wild aspect; as, to look fiercely.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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