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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [scene]

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scene

SCENE, n. [L. scena; Gr. Heb. The Greek word signifies a tent, hut or cottage. In L. it is an arbor or stage. The primary sense is to set or throw down.]

1. A stage; the theater or place where dramatic pieces and other shows are exhibited. It does not appear that the ancients changed the scenes in different parts of the play. Indeed the original scene for acting was an open plat of ground, shaded or slightly covered.

2. The whole series of actions and events connected and exhibited; or the whole assemblage of objects displayed at one view. Thus we say, the execution of a malefactor is a melancholy scene. The crucifixion of our Saviour was the most solemn scene ever presented to the view of man.

We say also, a scene of sorrow or of rejoicing, a noble scene, a sylvan scene.

A charming scene of nature is display'd.

3. A part of a play; a division of an act. A play is divided into acts, and acts are divided into scenes.

4. So much of an act of a play as represents what passes between the same persons in the same place.

5. The place represented by the sate. The scene was laid in the king's palace.

6. The curtain or hanging of a theater adapted to the play.

7. The place where any thing is exhibited.

The world is a vast scene of strife.

8. Any remarkable exhibition.

The shepherds, while watching their flocks upon the plains of Bethehem, were suddenly interrupted by one of the most sublime and surprising scenes which have ever been exhibited on earth.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [scene]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SCENE, n. [L. scena; Gr. Heb. The Greek word signifies a tent, hut or cottage. In L. it is an arbor or stage. The primary sense is to set or throw down.]

1. A stage; the theater or place where dramatic pieces and other shows are exhibited. It does not appear that the ancients changed the scenes in different parts of the play. Indeed the original scene for acting was an open plat of ground, shaded or slightly covered.

2. The whole series of actions and events connected and exhibited; or the whole assemblage of objects displayed at one view. Thus we say, the execution of a malefactor is a melancholy scene. The crucifixion of our Saviour was the most solemn scene ever presented to the view of man.

We say also, a scene of sorrow or of rejoicing, a noble scene, a sylvan scene.

A charming scene of nature is display'd.

3. A part of a play; a division of an act. A play is divided into acts, and acts are divided into scenes.

4. So much of an act of a play as represents what passes between the same persons in the same place.

5. The place represented by the sate. The scene was laid in the king's palace.

6. The curtain or hanging of a theater adapted to the play.

7. The place where any thing is exhibited.

The world is a vast scene of strife.

8. Any remarkable exhibition.

The shepherds, while watching their flocks upon the plains of Bethehem, were suddenly interrupted by one of the most sublime and surprising scenes which have ever been exhibited on earth.

SCENE, n. [Fr. id.; L. scena; Gr. σκηνη, Heb. שבן, to dwell; Ch. to subside, to settle; Syr. to come or fall on; Ar. سَكَنَ sakana, to be firm, stable, quiet, to set or establish, to quiet or cause to rest. Class Gn, No. 43, 44. The Gr. word signifies a tent, hut or cottage. In L. it is an arbor or stage. The primary sense is to set or throw down.]

  1. A stage; the theater or place where dramatic pieces and other shows are exhibited. It does not appear that the ancients changed the scenes in different parts of the play. Indeed the original scene for acting was an open plat of ground, shaded or slightly covered. – Encyc.
  2. The whole series of actions and events connected and exhibited; or the whole assemblage of objects displayed at one view. Thus we say, the execution of a malefactor is a melancholy scene. The crucifixion of our Saviour was the most solemn scene ever presented to the view of man. We say also, a scene of sorrow or of rejoicing, a noble scene, a sylvan scene. A charming scene of nature is display'd. – Dryden.
  3. A part of a play; a division of an act. A play is divided into acts, and acts are divided into scenes.
  4. So much of an act of a play as represents what passes between the same persons in the same place. – Dryden.
  5. The place represented by the stage. The scene was laid in the king's palace.
  6. The curtain or hanging of a theater adapted to the play.
  7. The place where any thing is exhibited. The world is a vast scene of strife. – J. M. Mason.
  8. Any remarkable exhibition. The shepherds, while watching their flocks upon the plain of Bethlehem, were suddenly interrupted by one of the most sublime and surprising scenes which have ever been exhibited on earth. – W. D. Sprague.

Scene
  1. The structure on which a spectacle or play is exhibited; the part of a theater in which the acting is done, with its adjuncts and decorations; the stage.
  2. To exhibit as a scene; to make a scene of; to display.

    [Obs.] Abp. Sancroft.
  3. The decorations and fittings of a stage, representing the place in which the action is supposed to go on; one of the slides, or other devices, used to give an appearance of reality to the action of a play; as, to paint scenes; to shift the scenes; to go behind the scenes.
  4. So much of a play as passes without change of locality or time, or important change of character; hence, a subdivision of an act; a separate portion of a play, subordinate to the act, but differently determined in different plays; as, an act of four scenes.

    My dismal scene I needs must act alone. Shak.

  5. The place, time, circumstance, etc., in which anything occurs, or in which the action of a story, play, or the like, is laid; surroundings amid which anything is set before the imagination; place of occurrence, exhibition, or action.

    "In Troy, there lies the scene." Shak.

    The world is a vast scene of strife. J. M. Mason.

  6. An assemblage of objects presented to the view at once; a series of actions and events exhibited in their connection; a spectacle; a show; an exhibition; a view.

    Through what new scenes and changes must we pass! Addison.

  7. A landscape, or part of a landscape; scenery.

    A sylvan scene with various greens was drawn,
    Shades on the sides, and in the midst a lawn.
    Dryden.

  8. An exhibition of passionate or strong feeling before others; often, an artifical or affected action, or course of action, done for effect; a theatrical display.

    Probably no lover of scenes would have had very long to wait for some explosions between parties, both equally ready to take offense, and careless of giving it. De Quincey.

    Behind the scenes, behind the scenery of a theater; out of the view of the audience, but in sight of the actors, machinery, etc.; hence, conversant with the hidden motives and agencies of what appears to public view.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Scene

SCENE, noun [Latin scena; Gr. Heb. The Greek word signifies a tent, hut or cottage. In Latin it is an arbor or stage. The primary sense is to set or throw down.]

1. A stage; the theater or place where dramatic pieces and other shows are exhibited. It does not appear that the ancients changed the scenes in different parts of the play. Indeed the original scene for acting was an open plat of ground, shaded or slightly covered.

2. The whole series of actions and events connected and exhibited; or the whole assemblage of objects displayed at one view. Thus we say, the execution of a malefactor is a melancholy scene The crucifixion of our Saviour was the most solemn scene ever presented to the view of man.

We say also, a scene of sorrow or of rejoicing, a noble scene a sylvan scene

A charming scene of nature is display'd.

3. A part of a play; a division of an act. A play is divided into acts, and acts are divided into scenes.

4. So much of an act of a play as represents what passes between the same persons in the same place.

5. The place represented by the sate. The scene was laid in the king's palace.

6. The curtain or hanging of a theater adapted to the play.

7. The place where any thing is exhibited.

The world is a vast scene of strife.

8. Any remarkable exhibition.

The shepherds, while watching their flocks upon the plains of Bethehem, were suddenly interrupted by one of the most sublime and surprising scenes which have ever been exhibited on earth.

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I USE IT WHEN PREPARING FOR BIBLE STUDY.

— Charles (Mobile, AL)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

winch

WINCH, n. A windlass; or an instrument with which to turn or strain something forcibly; as a winch to strain the cord of a bedstead, or to turn a wheel.

WINCH, v.i. To wince; to shrink; to kick with impatience or uneasiness. [This is a more correct orthography than wince.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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