HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Saturday - April 20, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [scandal]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

scandal

SCAN'DAL, n. [L. scandalum; Gr. In Greek, this word signifies a stumbling block, something against which a person impinges, or which causes him to fall.]

1. Offense given by the faults of another.

His lustful orgies he enlarg'd even to the hill of scandal.

[In this sense, we now generally use offense.]

2. Reproachful aspersion; opprobrious censure; defamatory speech or report; something uttered which is false and injurious to reputation.

My known virtue is from scandal free.

3. Shame; reproach; disgrace. Such is the perverted state of the human mind that some of the most heinous crimes bring little scandal upon the offender.

SCAN'DAL, v.t.

1. To treat opprobriously; to defame; to asperse; to traduce; to blacken character.

I do fawn on men, and hug them hard, and after scandal them. [Little used.]

2. To scandalize; to offend. [Not used.]



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [scandal]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SCAN'DAL, n. [L. scandalum; Gr. In Greek, this word signifies a stumbling block, something against which a person impinges, or which causes him to fall.]

1. Offense given by the faults of another.

His lustful orgies he enlarg'd even to the hill of scandal.

[In this sense, we now generally use offense.]

2. Reproachful aspersion; opprobrious censure; defamatory speech or report; something uttered which is false and injurious to reputation.

My known virtue is from scandal free.

3. Shame; reproach; disgrace. Such is the perverted state of the human mind that some of the most heinous crimes bring little scandal upon the offender.

SCAN'DAL, v.t.

1. To treat opprobriously; to defame; to asperse; to traduce; to blacken character.

I do fawn on men, and hug them hard, and after scandal them. [Little used.]

2. To scandalize; to offend. [Not used.]

SCAN'DAL, n. [Fr. scandale; It. scandalo; Sp. escandalo; L. scandalum; Gr. σκανδαλον; Ir. scannail, slander. In Greek, this word signifies a stumbling-block, something against which a person impinges, or which causes him to fall. In Sax. scande, sconde, signifies shame, confusion, dishonor, infamy; D. schande, id.; schandaal, reproach, scandal; G. schande, shame; schänden, to mar, disfigure, spoil, violate; Dan. skiender, to abuse, defame, &c.; Sans. schiande or ishianda, scandal. In Arm. scandal is a quarrel. The primary sense of the root must be to drive, to thrust, or to strike or east down.]

  1. Offense given by the faults of another. His lustful orgies he enlarg'd / Even to the hill of scandal. – Milton. [In this sense we now generally use offense.]
  2. Reproachful aspersion: opprobrious censure; defamatory speech or report; something uttered which is false and injurious to reputation. My known virtue is from scandal free. – Dryden.
  3. Shame; reproach; disgrace. Such is the perverted state of the human mind that some of the most hainous crimes bring little scandal upon the offender.

SCAN'DAL, v.t.

  1. To treat opprobriously; to defame; to asperse; to traduce; to blacken character. I do fawn on men, and hug them hard, / And after scandal them. [Little used.] – Shak.
  2. To scandalize; to offend. [Not used.] – Bp. Story.

Scan"dal
  1. Offense caused or experienced; reproach or reprobation called forth by what is regarded as wrong, criminal, heinous, or flagrant: opprobrium or disgrace.

    O, what a scandal is it to our crown,
    That two such noble peers as ye should jar!
    Shak.

    [I] have brought scandal
    To Israel, diffidence of God, and doubt
    In feeble hearts.
    Milton.

  2. To treat opprobriously; to defame; to asperse; to traduce; to slander.

    [R.]

    I do fawn on men and hug them hard
    And after scandal them.
    Shak.

  3. Reproachful aspersion; opprobrious censure; defamatory talk, uttered heedlessly or maliciously.

    You must not put another scandal on him. Shak.

    My known virtue is from scandal free. Dryden.

  4. To scandalize; to offend.

    [Obs.] Bp. Story.

    Syn. -- To defame; traduce; reproach; slander; calumniate; asperse; vilify; disgrace.

  5. Anything alleged in pleading which is impertinent, and is reproachful to any person, or which derogates from the dignity of the court, or is contrary to good manners.

    Daniell.

    Syn. -- Defamation; detraction; slander; calumny; opprobrium; reproach; shame; disgrace.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

84

609

66

661

96

651
Scandal

SCAN'DAL, noun [Latin scandalum; Gr. In Greek, this word signifies a stumbling block, something against which a person impinges, or which causes him to fall.]

1. Offense given by the faults of another.

His lustful orgies he enlarg'd even to the hill of scandal

[In this sense, we now generally use offense.]

2. Reproachful aspersion; opprobrious censure; defamatory speech or report; something uttered which is false and injurious to reputation.

My known virtue is from scandal free.

3. Shame; reproach; disgrace. Such is the perverted state of the human mind that some of the most heinous crimes bring little scandal upon the offender.

SCAN'DAL, verb transitive

1. To treat opprobriously; to defame; to asperse; to traduce; to blacken character.

I do fawn on men, and hug them hard, and after scandal them. [Little used.]

2. To scandalize; to offend. [Not used.]

Why 1828?

1
0
 


As an aspiring lexicographer, its necessary to be familiar with those monolithic edifices already firmly establishing the foundation.

— Chad (Bremerton, WA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

welcome

WELCOME, a.

1. Received with gladness; admitted willingly to the house, entertainment and company; as a welcome guest.

2. Grateful; pleasing; as a welcome present; welcome news.

3. Free to have or enjoy gratuitously. You are welcome to the use of my library.

To bid welcome, to receive with professions of kindness.

WELCOME, is used elliptically for you are welcome.

Welcome, great monarch, to your own.

Welcome to our house, an herb.

WELCOME, n.

1. Salutation of a new comer.

Welcome ever smiles--

2. Kind reception of a guest or new comer. We entered the house and found a ready welcome.

Truth finds an entrance and a welcome too.

WELCOME, v.t. To salute a new comer with kindness; or to receive and entertain hospitable, gratuitously and cheerfully.

Thus we salute thee with our early song, and welcome thee, and wish thee long.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

169

332

Compact Edition

133

113

CD-ROM

105

89

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.337 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top