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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [say]

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say

SAY, v.t. pret. and pp. said, contracted from sayed.

1. To speak; to utter in words; as, he said nothing; he said many things; he says not a word. Say a good word for me.

It is observable that although this word is radically synonymous with speak and tell, yet the uses are applications of these words are different. Thus we say, to speak an oration, to tell a story; but in these phrases, say cannot be used. Yet to say a lesson is good English, though not very elegant. We never use the phrases to say a sermon or discourse, to say an argument, to say a speech, to say testimony.

A very general use of say is to introduce a relation, narration or recital, either of the speaker himself or of something said or done or to be done by another. Thus Adam said, this is bone of my bone; Noah said, blessed be the Lord God of Shem. If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves. Say to the cities of Judah, behold your God. I cannot say what I should do in a similar case. Say thus precedes a sentence. But it is perhaps impracticable to reduce the peculiar and appropriate uses of say, speak and tell, to general rules. They can be learned only by observation.

2. To declare. Gen. 38.

3. To utter; to pronounce.

Say now Shibboleth. Judges 12.

4. To utter, as a command.

God said, let there be light. Gen. 1.

5. To utter, as a promise. Luke 23.

6. To utter, as a question or answer. Mark 11.

7. To affirm; to teach. Matt. 17.

8. To confess. Luke 17.

9. To testify. Acts 26.

10. To argue; to allege by way of argument.

After all that can be said against a thing -

11. To repeat; to rehearse; to recite; as, to say a lesson.

12. To pronounce; to recite without singing. Then shall be said or sung as follows.

13. To report; as in the phrases, it is said, they say.

14. To answer; to utter by way of reply; to tell.

Say, Stella, feel you no content, reflecting on a life well spent?

[Note - This verb is not properly intransitive. In the phrase, "as when we say, Plato is no fool," the last clause is the object after the verb; that is, "we say what follows." If this verb is properly intransitive in any case, it is in the phrase, "that is to say," but in such cases, the subsequent clause is the object of the verb, being that which is said, uttered or related.]

SAY, n. A speech; something said. [In popular use, but not elegant.]

SAY, n. [for assay.]

1. A sample. Obs.

2. Trial by sample. Obs.

SAY, n. A thin silk. Obs.

SAY,




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [say]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

SAY, v.t. pret. and pp. said, contracted from sayed.

1. To speak; to utter in words; as, he said nothing; he said many things; he says not a word. Say a good word for me.

It is observable that although this word is radically synonymous with speak and tell, yet the uses are applications of these words are different. Thus we say, to speak an oration, to tell a story; but in these phrases, say cannot be used. Yet to say a lesson is good English, though not very elegant. We never use the phrases to say a sermon or discourse, to say an argument, to say a speech, to say testimony.

A very general use of say is to introduce a relation, narration or recital, either of the speaker himself or of something said or done or to be done by another. Thus Adam said, this is bone of my bone; Noah said, blessed be the Lord God of Shem. If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves. Say to the cities of Judah, behold your God. I cannot say what I should do in a similar case. Say thus precedes a sentence. But it is perhaps impracticable to reduce the peculiar and appropriate uses of say, speak and tell, to general rules. They can be learned only by observation.

2. To declare. Gen. 38.

3. To utter; to pronounce.

Say now Shibboleth. Judges 12.

4. To utter, as a command.

God said, let there be light. Gen. 1.

5. To utter, as a promise. Luke 23.

6. To utter, as a question or answer. Mark 11.

7. To affirm; to teach. Matt. 17.

8. To confess. Luke 17.

9. To testify. Acts 26.

10. To argue; to allege by way of argument.

After all that can be said against a thing -

11. To repeat; to rehearse; to recite; as, to say a lesson.

12. To pronounce; to recite without singing. Then shall be said or sung as follows.

13. To report; as in the phrases, it is said, they say.

14. To answer; to utter by way of reply; to tell.

Say, Stella, feel you no content, reflecting on a life well spent?

[Note - This verb is not properly intransitive. In the phrase, "as when we say, Plato is no fool," the last clause is the object after the verb; that is, "we say what follows." If this verb is properly intransitive in any case, it is in the phrase, "that is to say," but in such cases, the subsequent clause is the object of the verb, being that which is said, uttered or related.]

SAY, n. A speech; something said. [In popular use, but not elegant.]

SAY, n. [for assay.]

1. A sample. Obs.

2. Trial by sample. Obs.

SAY, n. A thin silk. Obs.

SAY,


SAY, n.1 [Sax. saga, sagu.]

A speech; something said. [In popular use, but not elegant.]


SAY, n.2 [for assay.]

  1. A sample. [Obs.] – Sidney.
  2. Trial by sample. [Obs.] – Boyle.

SAY, n.3 [Fr. soie.]

A thin silk. [Obs.]


SAY, v.t. [pret. and pp. said, contracted from sayed. Sax. sægan, sacgan; G. sagen; D. zeggen; Sw. säga; Dan. siger; Ch. סוח or סח, to speak or say. The same verb in Arabic, سَاخَ sauga, signifies to sink, Goth. sigcan. The sense of the root is to throw or thrust. Class Sg, No. 28. Pers. sachan, a word, speech.]

  1. To speak; to utter in words; as, he said nothing; he said many things; he says not a word. Say a good word for me. It is observable that although this word is radically synonymous with speak and tell, yet the uses or applications of these words are different. Thus we say, to speak an oration, to tell a story; but in these phrases, say can not be used. Yet to say a lesson is good English, though not very elegant. We never use the phrases, to say a sermon or discourse, to say an argument, to say a speech, to say testimony. A very general use of say is to introduce a relation, narration or recital, either of the speaker himself or of something said or done or to be done by another. Thus Adam said, this is bone of my bone; Noah said, blessed be the Lord God of Shem. If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves. Say to the cities of Judah, behold your God. I can not say what I should do in a similar case. Say thus precedes a sentence. But it is perhaps impracticable to reduce the peculiar and appropriate uses of say, speak and tell to general rules. They can be learnt only by observation.
  2. To declare. – Gen. xxxvii.
  3. To utter; to pronounce. Say now Shibboleth. – Judg. xii.
  4. To utter, as a command. God said, let there be light. – Gen. i.
  5. To utter, as a promise. – Luke xxiii.
  6. To utter, as a question or answer. Mark xi.
  7. To affirm; to teach. – Matth. xvii.
  8. To confess. – Luke xvii.
  9. To testify. – Acts xxiv.
  10. To argue; to alledge by way of argument. After all that can be said against a thing. – Tillotson.
  11. To repeat; to rehearse; to recite; as, to say a lesson.
  12. To pronounce; to recite without singing. Then shall be said or sung as follows.
  13. To report; as, in the phrases, it is said, they say.
  14. To answer; to utter by way of reply; to tell. Say, Stella, feel you no content, Reflecting on a life well spent? – Swift. Note. This verb is not properly intransitive. In the phrase, “as when we say, Plato is no fool,” the last clause is the object after the verb; that is, “we say what follows.” If this verb is properly intransitive in any case, it is in the phrase, “that is to say,” but in such cases, the subsequent clause is the object of the verb, being that which is said, uttered or related.

Say
  1. Saw.

    Chaucer.
  2. Trial by sample; assay; sample; specimen; smack.

    [Obs.]

    If those principal works of God . . . be but certain tastes and says, as it were, of that final benefit. Hooker.

    Thy tongue some say of breeding breathes. Shak.

  3. To try; to assay.

    [Obs.] B. Jonson.
  4. A kind of silk or satin.

    [Obs.]

    Thou say, thou serge, nay, thou buckram lord! Shak.

  5. To utter or express in words; to tell; to speak; to declare; as, he said many wise things.

    Arise, and say how thou camest here. Shak.

  6. To speak; to express an opinion; to make answer; to reply.

    You have said; but whether wisely or no, let the forest judge. Shak.

    To this argument we shall soon have said; for what concerns it us to hear a husband divulge his household privacies? Milton.

  7. A speech; something said; an expression of opinion; a current story; a maxim or proverb.

    [Archaic or Colloq.]

    He no sooner said out his say, but up rises a cunning snap. L'Estrange.

    That strange palmer's boding say,
    That fell so ominous and drear
    Full on the object of his fear.
    Sir W. Scott.

  8. Tried quality; temper; proof.

    [Obs.]

    He found a sword of better say. Spenser.

  9. A delicate kind of serge, or woolen cloth.

    [Obs.]

    His garment neither was of silk nor say. Spenser.

  10. To repeat; to rehearse; to recite; to pronounce; as, to say a lesson.

    Of my instruction hast thou nothing bated
    In what thou hadst to say?
    Shak.

    After which shall be said or sung the following hymn. Bk. of Com. Prayer.

  11. Essay; trial; attempt.

    [Obs.]

    To give a say at, to attempt. B. Jonson.

  12. To announce as a decision or opinion; to state positively; to assert; hence, to form an opinion upon; to be sure about; to be determined in mind as to.

    But what it is, hard is to say. Milton.

  13. To mention or suggest as an estimate, hypothesis, or approximation; hence, to suppose; -- in the imperative, followed sometimes by the subjunctive; as, he had, say fifty thousand dollars; the fox had run, say ten miles.

    Say, for nonpayment that the debt should double,
    Is twenty hundred kisses such a trouble?
    Shak.

    It is said, or They say, it is commonly reported; it is rumored; people assert or maintain. - - That is to say, that is; in other words; otherwise.

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Say

SAY, verb transitive preterit tense and participle passive said, contracted from sayed.

1. To speak; to utter in words; as, he said nothing; he said many things; he says not a word. say a good word for me.

It is observable that although this word is radically synonymous with speak and tell, yet the uses are applications of these words are different. Thus we say to speak an oration, to tell a story; but in these phrases, say cannot be used. Yet to say a lesson is good English, though not very elegant. We never use the phrases to say a sermon or discourse, to say an argument, to say a speech, to say testimony.

A very general use of say is to introduce a relation, narration or recital, either of the speaker himself or of something said or done or to be done by another. Thus Adam said, this is bone of my bone; Noah said, blessed be the Lord God of Shem. If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves. say to the cities of Judah, behold your God. I cannot say what I should do in a similar case. say thus precedes a sentence. But it is perhaps impracticable to reduce the peculiar and appropriate uses of say speak and tell, to general rules. They can be learned only by observation.

2. To declare. Genesis 38:1.

3. To utter; to pronounce.

SAY now Shibboleth. Judges 12:6.

4. To utter, as a command.

God said, let there be light. Genesis 1:3.

5. To utter, as a promise. Luke 23:29.

6. To utter, as a question or answer. Mark 11:3.

7. To affirm; to teach. Matthew 17:10.

8. To confess. Luke 17:6.

9. To testify. Acts 26:22.

10. To argue; to allege by way of argument.

After all that can be said against a thing -

11. To repeat; to rehearse; to recite; as, to say a lesson.

12. To pronounce; to recite without singing. Then shall be said or sung as follows.

13. To report; as in the phrases, it is said, they say

14. To answer; to utter by way of reply; to tell.

SAY, Stella, feel you no content, reflecting on a life well spent?

[Note - This verb is not properly intransitive. In the phrase, 'as when we say Plato is no fool, ' the last clause is the object after the verb; that is, 'we say what follows.' If this verb is properly intransitive in any case, it is in the phrase, 'that is to say ' but in such cases, the subsequent clause is the object of the verb, being that which is said, uttered or related.]

SAY, noun A speech; something said. [In popular use, but not elegant.]

SAY, noun [for assay.]

1. A sample. obsolete

2. Trial by sample. obsolete

SAY, noun A thin silk. obsolete

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

calamine

CALAMINE, or CALAMIN, n. Lapis calaminaris, or cadmia fossilis; an ore of zink, much used in the composition of brass. This term is applied both to the siliceous oxyd and the native carbonate of zink. They an scarcely be distinguished by their external characters. They are generally compact, often stalactitic, and sometimes crystalized. Most of the calamines of England and Scotland are said to be carbonates.

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