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Tuesday - January 21, 2020

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [rudder]

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rudder

RUD'DER, n. [See Row. The oar was the first rudder used by man, and is still the instrument of steering certain boats.]

1. In navigation, the instrument by which a ship is steered; that part of the helm which consists of a piece of timber, broad at the bottom, which enters the water and is attached to the stern-post by hinges, on which it turns. This timber is managed by means of the tiller or wheel.

2. That which guides or governs the course.

For rhyme the rudder is of verses.

3. A sieve. [Local. See Riddle.]

Rudder perch, a small fish with the upper part of the body brown, varied with large round spots of yellow, the belly and sides streaked with lines of white and yellow. This fish is said to follow the rudders of ships in the warm parts of the Atlantic.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [rudder]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

RUD'DER, n. [See Row. The oar was the first rudder used by man, and is still the instrument of steering certain boats.]

1. In navigation, the instrument by which a ship is steered; that part of the helm which consists of a piece of timber, broad at the bottom, which enters the water and is attached to the stern-post by hinges, on which it turns. This timber is managed by means of the tiller or wheel.

2. That which guides or governs the course.

For rhyme the rudder is of verses.

3. A sieve. [Local. See Riddle.]

Rudder perch, a small fish with the upper part of the body brown, varied with large round spots of yellow, the belly and sides streaked with lines of white and yellow. This fish is said to follow the rudders of ships in the warm parts of the Atlantic.

RUD'DER, n. [G. ruder, an oar and a rudder; Sax. rother, an oar; D. roer, for roeder; Sw. roder; Dan. roer. See ROW. The oar was the first rudder used by man, and is still the instrument of steering certain boats.]

  1. In navigation, the instrument by which a ship is steered; that part of the helm which consists of a piece of timber, broad at the bottom, which enters the water and is attached to the stern-post by hinges, on which it turns. This timber is managed by means of the tiller or wheel. Mar. Dict.
  2. That which guides or governs the course. For rhyme the rudder is of verses. – Hudibras.
  3. A sieve. [Local. See Riddle.] Rudder perch, a small fish with the upper part of the body brown, varied with large round spots of yellow, the belly and sides streaked with lines of white and yellow. This fish is said to follow the rudders of ships in the warm parts of the Atlantic. Catesby. Pennant.

Rud"der
  1. A riddle or sieve.

    [Prov. Eng.]

  2. The mechanical appliance by means of which a vessel is guided or steered when in motion. It is a broad and flat blade made of wood or iron, with a long shank, and is fastened in an upright position, usually by one edge, to the sternpost of the vessel in such a way that it can be turned from side to side in the water by means of a tiller, wheel, or other attachment.
  3. In an aircraft, a surface the function of which is to exert a turning moment about an axis of the craft.
  4. Fig.: That which resembles a rudder as a guide or governor; that which guides or governs the course.

    For rhyme the rudder is of verses. Hudibras.

    Balance rudder (Naut.), a rudder pivoted near the middle instead of at the edge, -- common on sharpies. -- Drop rudder (Naut.), a rudder extending below the keel so as to be more effective in steering. -- Rudder chain (Naut.), one of the loose chains or ropes which fasten the rudder to the quarters to prevent its loss in case it gets unshipped, and for operating it in case the tiller or the wheel is broken. -- Rudder coat (Naut.), a covering of tarred canvas used to prevent water from entering the rudderhole. -- Rudder fish. (Zoöl.) (a) The pilot fish. (b) The amber fish (Seriola zonata), which is bluish having six broad black bands. (c) A plain greenish black American fish (Leirus perciformis); -- called also black rudder fish, logfish, and barrel fish. The name is also applied to other fishes which follow vessels. -- Rudder pendants (Naut.), ropes connected with the rudder chains.

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Rudder

RUD'DER, noun [See Row. The oar was the first rudder used by man, and is still the instrument of steering certain boats.]

1. In navigation, the instrument by which a ship is steered; that part of the helm which consists of a piece of timber, broad at the bottom, which enters the water and is attached to the stern-post by hinges, on which it turns. This timber is managed by means of the tiller or wheel.

2. That which guides or governs the course.

For rhyme the rudder is of verses.

3. A sieve. [Local. See Riddle.]

Rudder perch, a small fish with the upper part of the body brown, varied with large round spots of yellow, the belly and sides streaked with lines of white and yellow. This fish is said to follow the rudders of ships in the warm parts of the Atlantic.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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vermil

VER'MIL,'

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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