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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [ring]

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ring

RING, n.

1. A circle, or a circular line, or any thing in the form of a circular line or hoop. Thus we say of men, they formed themselves into a ring, to see a wrestling match. Rings of gold were made for the ark. Ex. 25. Rings of gold or other material are worn on the fingers and sometimes in the ears, as ornaments.

2. A circular course.

Place me, O place me in the dusty ring, where youthful charioteers contend for glory.

RING, n. [from the verb.]

1. A sound; particularly, the sound of metals; as the ring of a bell.

2. Any loud sound, or the sounds of numerous voices; or sound continued, repeated or reverberated; as the ring of acclamations.

3. A chime, or set of bells harmonically tuned.

RING, v.t. pret. and pp. rung.

To cause to sound, particularly by striking a metallic body; as, to ring a bell. This word expresses appropriately the sounding of metals.

RING, v.t. [from the noun.

1. To encircle.

2. To fit with rings, as the fingers, or as a swine's snout. Farmers ring swine to prevent their rooting.

And ring these fingers with thy household worms.

RING, v.i.

1. To sound, as a bell or other sonorous body, particularly a metallic one.

2. To practice the art of making music with bells.

3. To sound; to resound.

With sweeter notes each rising temple rung.

4. To utter, as a bell; to sound.

The shardborn beetle with his drowsy hums, hath rung night's yawning peal.

5. To tinkle; to have the sensation of sound continued.

My ears still ring with noise.

6. To be filled with report or talk. The whole town rings with his fame.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [ring]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

RING, n.

1. A circle, or a circular line, or any thing in the form of a circular line or hoop. Thus we say of men, they formed themselves into a ring, to see a wrestling match. Rings of gold were made for the ark. Ex. 25. Rings of gold or other material are worn on the fingers and sometimes in the ears, as ornaments.

2. A circular course.

Place me, O place me in the dusty ring, where youthful charioteers contend for glory.

RING, n. [from the verb.]

1. A sound; particularly, the sound of metals; as the ring of a bell.

2. Any loud sound, or the sounds of numerous voices; or sound continued, repeated or reverberated; as the ring of acclamations.

3. A chime, or set of bells harmonically tuned.

RING, v.t. pret. and pp. rung.

To cause to sound, particularly by striking a metallic body; as, to ring a bell. This word expresses appropriately the sounding of metals.

RING, v.t. [from the noun.

1. To encircle.

2. To fit with rings, as the fingers, or as a swine's snout. Farmers ring swine to prevent their rooting.

And ring these fingers with thy household worms.

RING, v.i.

1. To sound, as a bell or other sonorous body, particularly a metallic one.

2. To practice the art of making music with bells.

3. To sound; to resound.

With sweeter notes each rising temple rung.

4. To utter, as a bell; to sound.

The shardborn beetle with his drowsy hums, hath rung night's yawning peal.

5. To tinkle; to have the sensation of sound continued.

My ears still ring with noise.

6. To be filled with report or talk. The whole town rings with his fame.

RING, n.1 [Sax. ring or hring; D. ring or kring; G. D. and Sw. ring, a circle; Sw. kring, about, around. This coincides with ring, to sound, and with wring, to twist; G. ringen, to ring or sound, and to wrestle. The sense is to strain or stretch, and n is probably not radical. The root then belongs to Class Rg.]

  1. A circle, or a circular line, or any thing in the form of a circular line or hoop. Thus we say of men, they formed themselves into a ring, to see a wrestling match. Rings of gold were made for the ark. Exod. xxv. Rings of gold or other material are worn on the fingers and sometimes in the ears, as ornaments.
  2. A circular course. Place me, O place me in the dusty ring, / Where youthful charioteers contend for glory. – Smith.

RING, n.2 [from the verb.]

  1. A sound; particularly, the sound of metals; as, the ring of a bell.
  2. Any loud sound, or the sounds of numerous voices; or sound continued, repeated or reverberated; as, the ring of acclamations. – Bacon.
  3. A chime, or set of bells harmonically tuned. – Prior.

RING, v.i.

  1. To sound, as a bell or other sonorous body, particularly a metallic one. – Dryden.
  2. To practice the art of making music with bells. – Holder.
  3. To sound; to resound. With sweeter notes each rising temple rung. – Pope.
  4. To utter, as a bell; to sound. The shardborn beetle with his drowsy hums, / Hath rung night's yawning peal. – Shak.
  5. To tinkle; to have the sensation of sound continued. My ears shall ring with noise. – Dryden.
  6. To be filled with report or talk. The whole town rings with his fame.

RING, v.t.1 [pret. and pp. rung. Sax. ringan, hringan; G. and D. ringen; Sw. ringa; Dan. ringer.]

To cause to sound, particularly by striking a metallic body; as, to ring a bell. This word expresses appropriately the sanding of metals.


RING, v.t.2 [from the noun.]

  1. To encircle. Shak.
  2. To fit with rings, as the fingers, or as a swine's snout. Farmers ring swine to prevent their rooting. And ring these fingers with thy household worms. – Shak.

Ring
  1. To cause to sound, especially by striking, as a metallic body; as, to ring a bell.
  2. To sound, as a bell or other sonorous body, particularly a metallic one.

    Now ringen trompes loud and clarion. Chaucer.

    Why ring not out the bells? Shak.

  3. A sound; especially, the sound of vibrating metals; as, the ring of a bell.
  4. Specifically, a circular ornament of gold or other precious material worn on the finger, or attached to the ear, the nose, or some other part of the person; as, a wedding ring.

    Upon his thumb he had of gold a ring. Chaucer.

    The dearest ring in Venice will I give you. Shak.

  5. To surround with a ring, or as with a ring] to encircle.

    "Ring these fingers." Shak.
  6. To rise in the air spirally.
  7. To make (a sound), as by ringing a bell; to sound.

    The shard-borne beetle, with his drowsy hums,
    Hath rung night's yawning peal.
    Shak.

  8. To practice making music with bells.

    Holder.
  9. Any loud sound; the sound of numerous voices; a sound continued, repeated, or reverberated.

    The ring of acclamations fresh in his ears. Bacon

  10. A circular area in which races are or run or other sports are performed; an arena.

    Place me, O, place me in the dusty ring,
    Where youthful charioteers contend for glory.
    E. Smith.

  11. To make a ring around by cutting away the bark; to girdle; as, to ring branches or roots.
  12. To repeat often, loudly, or earnestly.

    To ring a peal, to ring a set of changes on a chime of bells. -- To ring the changes upon. See under Change. -- To ring in or out, to usher, attend on, or celebrate, by the ringing of bells; as, to ring out the old year and ring in the new. Tennyson. -- To ring the bells backward, to sound the chimes, reversing the common order; -- formerly done as a signal of alarm or danger. Sir W. Scott.

  13. To sound loud; to resound; to be filled with a ringing or reverberating sound.

    With sweeter notes each rising temple rung. Pope.

    The hall with harp and carol rang. Tennyson.

    My ears still ring with noise. Dryden.

  14. A chime, or set of bells harmonically tuned.

    As great and tunable a ring of bells as any in the world. Fuller.

  15. An inclosed space in which pugilists fight; hence, figuratively, prize fighting.

    "The road was an institution, the ring was an institution." Thackeray.
  16. To fit with a ring or with rings, as the fingers, or a swine's snout.
  17. To continue to sound or vibrate; to resound.

    The assertion is still ringing in our ears. Burke.

  18. A circular group of persons.

    And hears the Muses in a ring
    Aye round about Jove's alter sing.
    Milton.

  19. To be filled with report or talk; as, the whole town rings with his fame.
  20. The plane figure included between the circumferences of two concentric circles.

    (b)
  21. An instrument, formerly used for taking the sun's altitude, consisting of a brass ring suspended by a swivel, with a hole at one side through which a solar ray entering indicated the altitude on the graduated inner surface opposite.
  22. An elastic band partly or wholly encircling the spore cases of ferns. See Illust. of Sporangium.
  23. A clique] an exclusive combination of persons for a selfish purpose, as to control the market, distribute offices, obtain contracts, etc.

    The ruling ring at Constantinople. E. A. Freeman.

    Ring armor, armor composed of rings of metal. See Ring mail, below, and Chain mail, under Chain. -- Ring blackbird (Zoöl.), the ring ousel. -- Ring canal (Zoöl.), the circular water tube which surrounds the esophagus of echinoderms. -- Ring dotterel, or Ringed dotterel. (Zoöl.) See Dotterel, and Illust. of Pressiroster. -- Ring dropper, a sharper who pretends to have found a ring (dropped by himself), and tries to induce another to buy it as valuable, it being worthless. -- Ring fence. See under Fence. -- Ring finger, the third finger of the left hand, or the next the little finger, on which the ring is placed in marriage. -- Ring formula (Chem.), a graphic formula in the shape of a closed ring, as in the case of benzene, pyridine, etc. See Illust. under Benzene. -- Ring mail, a kind of mail made of small steel rings sewed upon a garment of leather or of cloth. -- Ring micrometer. (Astron.) See Circular micrometer, under Micrometer. -- Saturn's rings. See Saturn. -- Ring ousel. (Zoöl.) See Ousel. -- Ring parrot (Zoöl.), any one of several species of Old World parrakeets having a red ring around the neck, especially Palæornis torquatus, common in India, and P. Alexandri of Java. -- Ring plover. (Zoöl.) (a) The ringed dotterel. (b) Any one of several small American plovers having a dark ring around the neck, as the semipalmated plover (Ægialitis semipalmata). -- Ring snake (Zoöl.), a small harmless American snake (Diadophis punctatus) having a white ring around the neck. The back is ash-colored, or sage green, the belly of an orange red. -- Ring stopper. (Naut.) See under Stopper. -- Ring thrush (Zoöl.), the ring ousel. -- The prize ring, the ring in which prize fighters contend; prize fighters, collectively. -- The ring. (a) The body of sporting men who bet on horse races. [Eng.] (b) The prize ring.

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Ring

RING, noun

1. A circle, or a circular line, or any thing in the form of a circular line or hoop. Thus we say of men, they formed themselves into a ring to see a wrestling match. Rings of gold were made for the ark. Exodus 25:12. Rings of gold or other material are worn on the fingers and sometimes in the ears, as ornaments.

2. A circular course.

Place me, O place me in the dusty ring where youthful charioteers contend for glory.

RING, noun [from the verb.]

1. A sound; particularly, the sound of metals; as the ring of a bell.

2. Any loud sound, or the sounds of numerous voices; or sound continued, repeated or reverberated; as the ring of acclamations.

3. A chime, or set of bells harmonically tuned.

RING, verb transitive preterit tense and participle passive rung.

To cause to sound, particularly by striking a metallic body; as, to ring a bell. This word expresses appropriately the sounding of metals.

RING, verb transitive [from the noun.

1. To encircle.

2. To fit with rings, as the fingers, or as a swine's snout. Farmers ring swine to prevent their rooting.

And ring these fingers with thy household worms.

RING, verb intransitive

1. To sound, as a bell or other sonorous body, particularly a metallic one.

2. To practice the art of making music with bells.

3. To sound; to resound.

With sweeter notes each rising temple rung.

4. To utter, as a bell; to sound.

The shardborn beetle with his drowsy hums, hath rung night's yawning peal.

5. To tinkle; to have the sensation of sound continued.

My ears still ring with noise.

6. To be filled with report or talk. The whole town rings with his fame.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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