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Monday - December 9, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [ridicule]

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ridicule

RID'ICULE, n. [L. ridiculum, from rideo, to laugh or laugh at.]

1. Contemptuous laughter; laughter with some degree of contempt; derision. It expresses less than scorn. Ridicule is aimed at what is not only laughable, but improper, absurd or despicable. Sacred subjects should never be treated with ridicule. [See Ludicrous.]

Ridicule is too rough an entertainment for the polished and refined. It is banished from France, and is losing ground in England.

2. That species of writing which excites contempt with laughter. It differs from burlesque, which may excite laughter without contempt, or it may provoke derision.

Ridicule and derision are not exactly the same, as derision is applied to persons only, and ridicule to persons or things. We deride the man, but ridicule the man or his performances.

RID'ICULE, v.t.

1. To laugh at with expressions of contempt; to deride.

2. To treat with contemptuous merriment; to expose to contempt or derision by writing.

RID'ICULE, a. Ridiculous. [Not in use.]




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [ridicule]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

RID'ICULE, n. [L. ridiculum, from rideo, to laugh or laugh at.]

1. Contemptuous laughter; laughter with some degree of contempt; derision. It expresses less than scorn. Ridicule is aimed at what is not only laughable, but improper, absurd or despicable. Sacred subjects should never be treated with ridicule. [See Ludicrous.]

Ridicule is too rough an entertainment for the polished and refined. It is banished from France, and is losing ground in England.

2. That species of writing which excites contempt with laughter. It differs from burlesque, which may excite laughter without contempt, or it may provoke derision.

Ridicule and derision are not exactly the same, as derision is applied to persons only, and ridicule to persons or things. We deride the man, but ridicule the man or his performances.

RID'ICULE, v.t.

1. To laugh at with expressions of contempt; to deride.

2. To treat with contemptuous merriment; to expose to contempt or derision by writing.

RID'ICULE, a. Ridiculous. [Not in use.]


RID'I-CULE, a.

Ridiculous. [Not in use.]


RID'I-CULE, n. [Fr. from L. ridiculum, from rideo, to laugh or laugh at; Fr. rider, to wrinkle, to bend the brow; Arm. redenna.]

  1. Contemptuous laughter; laughter with some degree of contempt; derision. It expresses less than scorn. Ridicule is aimed at what is not only laughable, but improper, absurd or despicable. Sacred subjects should never be treated with ridicule. [See Ludicrous.] Ridicule is too rough an entertainment for the polished and refined. It is banished from France, and is losing ground in England. – Kames.
  2. That species of writing which excites contempt with laughter. It differs from burlesque, which may excite laughter without contempt, or it may provoke derision. – Ibid. Ridicule and derision are not exactly the same, as derision is applied to persons only, and ridicule to persons or things. We deride the man, but ridicule the man or his performances.

RID'I-CULE, v.t.

  1. To laugh at with expressions of contempt; to deride.
  2. To treat with contemptuous merriment; to expose to contempt or derision by writing.

Rid"i*cule
  1. An object of sport or laughter; a laughingstock; a laughing matter.

    [Marlborough] was so miserably ignorant, that his deficiencies made him the ridicule of his contemporaries. Buckle.

    To the people . . . but a trifle, to the king but a ridicule. Foxe.

  2. To laugh at mockingly or disparagingly] to awaken ridicule toward or respecting.

    I 've known the young, who ridiculed his rage. Goldsmith.

    Syn. -- To deride; banter; rally; burlesque; mock; satirize; lampoon. See Deride.

  3. Ridiculous.

    [Obs.]

    This action . . . became so ridicule. Aubrey.

  4. Remarks concerning a subject or a person designed to excite laughter with a degree of contempt; wit of that species which provokes contemptuous laughter; disparagement by making a person an object of laughter; banter; -- a term lighter than derision.

    We have in great measure restricted the meaning of ridicule, which would properly extend over whole region of the ridiculous, -- the laughable, -- and we have narrowed it so that in common usage it mostly corresponds to "derision", which does indeed involve personal and offensive feelings. Hare.

    Safe from the bar, the pulpit, and the throne,
    Yet touched and shamed by ridicule alone.
    Pope.

  5. Quality of being ridiculous; ridiculousness.

    [Obs.]

    To see the ridicule of this practice. Addison.

    Syn. -- Derision; banter; raillery; burlesque; mockery; irony; satire; sarcasm; gibe; jeer; sneer. -- Ridicule, Derision, Both words imply disapprobation; but ridicule usually signifies good-natured, fun-loving opposition without manifest malice, while derision is commonly bitter and scornful, and sometimes malignant.

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Ridicule

RID'ICULE, noun [Latin ridiculum, from rideo, to laugh or laugh at.]

1. Contemptuous laughter; laughter with some degree of contempt; derision. It expresses less than scorn. ridicule is aimed at what is not only laughable, but improper, absurd or despicable. Sacred subjects should never be treated with ridicule [See Ludicrous.]

Ridicule is too rough an entertainment for the polished and refined. It is banished from France, and is losing ground in England.

2. That species of writing which excites contempt with laughter. It differs from burlesque, which may excite laughter without contempt, or it may provoke derision.

Ridicule and derision are not exactly the same, as derision is applied to persons only, and ridicule to persons or things. We deride the man, but ridicule the man or his performances.

RID'ICULE, verb transitive

1. To laugh at with expressions of contempt; to deride.

2. To treat with contemptuous merriment; to expose to contempt or derision by writing.

RID'ICULE, adjective Ridiculous. [Not in use.]

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Definitions of words in the KJV of the Bible.

— Rod (Spokane, WA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

rough

ROUGH, a. [L. raucus. Eng. rye, that is rough. L. ruga, a wrinkle. Gr. to snore. L. ruga, a wrinkle, a ridge. See Ridge. The primary sense is to stretch or strain; but applied to roughness or wrinkling, it is to draw or contract, a straining together.]

1. Having inequalities, small ridges or points on the surface; not smooth or plane; as a rough board, a rough stone; rough cloth.

2. Stony; abounding with stones and stumps; as rough land; or simply with stones; as a rough road.

3. Not wrought or polished; as a rough diamond.

4. Thrown into huge waves; violently agitated; as a rough sea.

5. Tempestuous; stormy; boisterous; as rough weather.

6. Austere to the taste; harsh; as rough wine.

7. Harsh to the ear; grating; jarring; unharmonious; as rough sounds; rough numbers.

8. Rugged of temper; severe; austere; rude; not mild or courteous.

A fiend, a fury, pitiless and rough.

9. Coarse in manners; rude.

A surly boatman, rough as seas and wind.

10. Harsh; violent; not easy; as a rough remedy.

11. Hard featured; not delicate; as a rough visage.

12. Harsh; severe; uncivil; as rough usage.

13. Terrible; dreadful.

On the rough edge of battle, ere it join'd, Satan advanc'd.

14. Rugged; disordered in appearance; coarse.

Rough from the tossing surge Ulysses moves.

15. Hairy; shaggy; covered with hairs, bristles and the like.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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