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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [ride]

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ride

RIDE, v.i. pret. rode or rid; pp. rid, ridden. [L rheda, a chariot or vehicle.]

1. To be carried on horseback, or on any beast, or in any vehicle. We ride on a horse, on a camel, in a coach, chariot, wagon, &c.

2. To be borne on or in a fluid. A ship rides at anchor; the ark rode on the flood; a balloon rides in the air.

He rode on a cherub and did fly; yea, he did fly on the wings of the wind. Ps. 18.

3. To be supported in motion.

Strong as the axle-tree on which heaven rides.

4. To practice riding. He rides often for his health.

5. To manage a horse well.

He rode, he fenc'd, he mov'd with graceful ease.

6. To be supported by something subservient; to sit.

On whose foolish honesty my practices rid easy.

To ride easy, in seaman's language, is when a ship does not labor or feel a great strain on her cables.

To ride hard, is when a ship pitches violently, so as to strain her cables, masts and hull.

To ride out, as a gale, signifies that a ship does not drive during a storm.

RIDE, v.t.

1. To sit on, so as to be carried; as, to ride a horse.

They ride the air in whirlwind.

2. To manage insolently at will; as in priestridden.

The nobility could no longer endure to be ridden by bakers, cobblers and brewers.

3. To carry. [Local.]

RIDE, n.

1. An excursion on horseback or in a vehicle.

2. A saddle horse. [Local.]

3. A road cut in a wood or through a ground for the amusement of riding; a riding.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [ride]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

RIDE, v.i. pret. rode or rid; pp. rid, ridden. [L rheda, a chariot or vehicle.]

1. To be carried on horseback, or on any beast, or in any vehicle. We ride on a horse, on a camel, in a coach, chariot, wagon, &c.

2. To be borne on or in a fluid. A ship rides at anchor; the ark rode on the flood; a balloon rides in the air.

He rode on a cherub and did fly; yea, he did fly on the wings of the wind. Ps. 18.

3. To be supported in motion.

Strong as the axle-tree on which heaven rides.

4. To practice riding. He rides often for his health.

5. To manage a horse well.

He rode, he fenc'd, he mov'd with graceful ease.

6. To be supported by something subservient; to sit.

On whose foolish honesty my practices rid easy.

To ride easy, in seaman's language, is when a ship does not labor or feel a great strain on her cables.

To ride hard, is when a ship pitches violently, so as to strain her cables, masts and hull.

To ride out, as a gale, signifies that a ship does not drive during a storm.

RIDE, v.t.

1. To sit on, so as to be carried; as, to ride a horse.

They ride the air in whirlwind.

2. To manage insolently at will; as in priestridden.

The nobility could no longer endure to be ridden by bakers, cobblers and brewers.

3. To carry. [Local.]

RIDE, n.

1. An excursion on horseback or in a vehicle.

2. A saddle horse. [Local.]

3. A road cut in a wood or through a ground for the amusement of riding; a riding.


RIDE, n.

  1. An excursion on horseback or in a vehicle.
  2. A saddle horse. [Local.] – Grose.
  3. A road cut in a wood or through a ground, for the amusement of riding; a riding.

RIDE, v.i. [pret. rode or rid; pp. rid, ridden. Sax. ridan; G. reiten; D. ryden; Sw. rida; Dan. rider; W. rhedu, to run; L. rheda, a chariot or vehicle; Hindoo, ratha, id.; Sax. rad, a riding or a road; Ir. ratha, riadh, a running; reatham, to run; ridire, a knight; allied to ready, G. bereit; beriten, to ride, and to get ready. See Ready. Class Rd, No. 5, 9.]

  1. To be carried on horseback, or on any beast, or in any beast, or in any vehicle. We ride on a horse, on a camel, in a coach, chariot, wagon, &c.
  2. To be borne on or in a fluid. A ship rides at anchor; the ark rode on a flood; a balloon rides in the air. He rode on a cherub and did fly; yea, he did fly on the wings of the wind. – Ps xviii.
  3. To be supported in motion. Strong as the axle-tree / On which heaven rides. – Shak.
  4. To practice riding. He rides often for his health.
  5. To manage a horse well. He rode, he fenc'd, he mov'd with graceful ease. – Dryden.
  6. To be supported by something subservient; to sit. On whose foolish honesty / My practices rid easy. – Shak. To ride easy, in seamen's language, is when a ship does not labor or feel a great strain on her cables. To ride hard, is when a ship pitches violently, so as to strain her cables, masts, and hull. To ride out, as a gale, signifies that a ship does not drive during a storm.

RIDE, v.t.

  1. To sit on, so as to be carried; as, to ride a horse. They ride the air in whirlwind. – Milton.
  2. To manage insolently at will; as in priest-ridden. The nobility could no longer endure to be ridden by bakers, cobblers, and brewers. – Swift.
  3. To carry. [Local.]

Ride
  1. To be carried on the back of an animal, as a horse.

    To-morrow, when ye riden by the way. Chaucer.

    Let your master ride on before, and do you gallop after him. Swift.

  2. To sit on, so as to be carried; as, to ride a horse; to ride a bicycle.

    [They] rend up both rocks and hills, and ride the air
    In whirlwind.
    Milton.

  3. The act of riding; an excursion on horseback or in a vehicle.
  4. To be borne in a carriage; as, to ride in a coach, in a car, and the like. See Synonym, below.

    The richest inhabitants exhibited their wealth, not by riding in gilden carriages, but by walking the streets with trains of servants. Macaulay.

  5. To manage insolently at will; to domineer over.

    The nobility could no longer endure to be ridden by bakers, cobblers, and brewers. Swift.

  6. A saddle horse.

    [Prov. Eng.] Wright.
  7. To be borne or in a fluid; to float; to lie.

    Men once walked where ships at anchor ride. Dryden.

  8. To convey, as by riding; to make or do by riding.

    Tue only men that safe can ride
    Mine errands on the Scottish side.
    Sir W. Scott.

  9. A road or avenue cut in a wood, or through grounds, to be used as a place for riding; a riding.
  10. To be supported in motion; to rest.

    Strong as the exletree
    On which heaven rides.
    Shak.

    On whose foolish honesty
    My practices ride easy!
    Shak.

  11. To overlap (each other); -- said of bones or fractured fragments.

    To ride a hobby, to have some favorite occupation or subject of talk. -- To ride and tie, to take turn with another in labor and rest; -- from the expedient adopted by two persons with one horse, one of whom rides the animal a certain distance, and then ties him for the use of the other, who is coming up on foot. Fielding. -- To ride down. (a) To ride over; to trample down in riding; to overthrow by riding against; as, to ride down an enemy. (b) (Naut.) To bear down, as on a halyard when hoisting a sail. -- To ride out (Naut.), to keep safe afloat during (a storm) while riding at anchor or when hove to on the open sea; as, to ride out the gale.

  12. To manage a horse, as an equestrian.

    He rode, he fenced, he moved with graceful ease. Dryden.

  13. To support a rider, as a horse; to move under the saddle; as, a horse rides easy or hard, slow or fast.

    To ride easy (Naut.), to lie at anchor without violent pitching or straining at the cables. -- To ride hard (Naut.), to pitch violently. -- To ride out. (a) To go upon a military expedition. [Obs.] Chaucer. (b) To ride in the open air. [Colloq.] -- To ride to hounds, to ride behind, and near to, the hounds in hunting.

    Syn. -- Drive. -- Ride, Drive. Ride originally meant (and is so used throughout the English Bible) to be carried on horseback or in a vehicle of any kind. At present in England, drive is the word applied in most cases to progress in a carriage; as, a drive around the park, etc.; while ride is appropriated to progress on a horse. Johnson seems to sanction this distinction by giving "to travel on horseback" as the leading sense of ride; though he adds "to travel in a vehicle" as a secondary sense. This latter use of the word still occurs to some extent; as, the queen rides to Parliament in her coach of state; to ride in an omnibus.

    "Will you ride over or drive?" said Lord Willowby to his quest, after breakfast that morning. W. Black.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Ride

RIDE, verb intransitive preterit tense rode or rid; participle passive rid, ridden. [L rheda, a chariot or vehicle.]

1. To be carried on horseback, or on any beast, or in any vehicle. We ride on a horse, on a camel, in a coach, chariot, wagon, etc.

2. To be borne on or in a fluid. A ship rides at anchor; the ark rode on the flood; a balloon rides in the air.

He rode on a cherub and did fly; yea, he did fly on the wings of the wind. Psalms 18:1.

3. To be supported in motion.

Strong as the axle-tree on which heaven rides.

4. To practice riding. He rides often for his health.

5. To manage a horse well.

He rode, he fenc'd, he mov'd with graceful ease.

6. To be supported by something subservient; to sit.

On whose foolish honesty my practices rid easy.

To ride easy, in seaman's language, is when a ship does not labor or feel a great strain on her cables.

To ride hard, is when a ship pitches violently, so as to strain her cables, masts and hull.

To ride out, as a gale, signifies that a ship does not drive during a storm.

RIDE, verb transitive

1. To sit on, so as to be carried; as, to ride a horse.

They ride the air in whirlwind.

2. To manage insolently at will; as in priestridden.

The nobility could no longer endure to be ridden by bakers, cobblers and brewers.

3. To carry. [Local.]

RIDE, noun

1. An excursion on horseback or in a vehicle.

2. A saddle horse. [Local.]

3. A road cut in a wood or through a ground for the amusement of riding; a riding.

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thoughts from purer minds at time of greater purity than the minds of our people are beleagued with today G. Michael Stinson

— Mike (Kingfisher, OK)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

batable

BA'TABLE, a. [See Bate and Debate.] Disputable. The land between England and Scotland, which, when the kingdoms were distinct, was

57

a subject of contention, was called batable ground.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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