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Saturday - December 15, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [recover]

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recover

RECOVER, v.t. [L. recupero; re and capio, to take.]

1. To regain; to get or obtain that which was lost; as, to recover stolen goods; to recover a town or territory which an enemy had taken; to recover sight or senses; to recover health or strength after sickness.

David recovered all that the Amalekites had carried away. 1Sam. 30.

2. To restore from sickness; as, to recover one from leprosy. 2Kings 5.

3. To revive from apparent death; as, to recover a drowned man.

4. To regain by reparation; to repair the loss of, or to repair an injury done by neglect; as, to recover lost time.

Good men have lapses and failings to lament and recover.

5. To regain a former state by liberation from capture or possession.

That they may recover themselves out of the snare of the devil. 2Tim. 2.

6. To gain as a compensation; to obtain in return for injury or debt; as, to recover damages in trespass; to recover debt and cost in a suit at law.

7. To reach; to come to.

The forest is not three leagues off; if we recover that, we're sure enough.

8. To obtain title to by judgment in a court of law; as, to recover lands in ejectment or common recovery.

RECOVER, v.i.

1. To regain health after sickness; to grow well; followed by of or from.

Go, inquire of Beelzebub, the god of Ekron, whether I shall recover of this disease. 2Kings 1.

2. To regain a former state or condition after misfortune; as, to recover from a state of poverty or depression.

3. To obtain a judgment in law; to succeed in a lawsuit. The plaintiff has recovered in his suit.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [recover]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

RECOVER, v.t. [L. recupero; re and capio, to take.]

1. To regain; to get or obtain that which was lost; as, to recover stolen goods; to recover a town or territory which an enemy had taken; to recover sight or senses; to recover health or strength after sickness.

David recovered all that the Amalekites had carried away. 1Sam. 30.

2. To restore from sickness; as, to recover one from leprosy. 2Kings 5.

3. To revive from apparent death; as, to recover a drowned man.

4. To regain by reparation; to repair the loss of, or to repair an injury done by neglect; as, to recover lost time.

Good men have lapses and failings to lament and recover.

5. To regain a former state by liberation from capture or possession.

That they may recover themselves out of the snare of the devil. 2Tim. 2.

6. To gain as a compensation; to obtain in return for injury or debt; as, to recover damages in trespass; to recover debt and cost in a suit at law.

7. To reach; to come to.

The forest is not three leagues off; if we recover that, we're sure enough.

8. To obtain title to by judgment in a court of law; as, to recover lands in ejectment or common recovery.

RECOVER, v.i.

1. To regain health after sickness; to grow well; followed by of or from.

Go, inquire of Beelzebub, the god of Ekron, whether I shall recover of this disease. 2Kings 1.

2. To regain a former state or condition after misfortune; as, to recover from a state of poverty or depression.

3. To obtain a judgment in law; to succeed in a lawsuit. The plaintiff has recovered in his suit.

RE-COV-ER, v.i.

  1. To regain health after sickness; to grew well; followed by of or from. Go, inquire of Beelzebub, the god of Ekron, whether I shall recover of this disease. – 2 Kings i.
  2. To regain a former state or condition after misfortune; as, to recover from a state of poverty or depression.
  3. To obtain a judgment in law; to succeed in a lawsuit. The plaintif has recovered in his suit.

RE-COV-ER, v.t. [Fr. recouvrer; It. ricoverare or ricuperare; Sp. and Port. recobrar; L. recupero; re and capio, to take.]

  1. To regain; to get or obtain that which was lost; as, to recover stolen goods; to recover a town or territory which an enemy had taken; to recover sight or senses; to recover health or strength after sickness. David recovered all that the Amalekites had carried away. – 1 Sam. xxx.
  2. To restore from sickness; as, to recover one from leprosy. – 2 Kings v.
  3. To revive from apparent death; as, to recover a drowned man.
  4. To gain by reparation; to repair the loss of, or to repair an injury done by neglect; as, to recover lost time. Good men have lapses and failings to lament and recover. – Rogers.
  5. To regain a former state by liberation from capture or possession. That they may recover themselves out of the snare of the devil. – 2 Tim. ii.
  6. To gain as a compensation; to obtain in return for injury or debt; as, to recover damages in trespass; to recover debt and cost in a suit at law.
  7. To reach; to come to. The forest is not three leagues off; / If we recover that, we're sure enough. – Shak.
  8. To obtain title to by judgment in a court of law; as, to recover lands in ejectment or common recovery.

Re*cov"er
  1. To cover again.

    Sir W. Scott.
  2. To get or obtain again; to get renewed possession of; to win back; to regain.

    David recovered all that the Amalekites had carried away. 1. Sam. xxx. 18.

  3. To regain health after sickness; to grow well; to be restored or cured; hence, to regain a former state or condition after misfortune, alarm, etc.; -- often followed by of or from; as, to recover from a state of poverty; to recover from fright.

    Go, inquire of Baal-zebub, the god of Ekron, whether I shall recover of this disease. 2 Kings i. 2.

  4. Recovery.

    Sir T. Malory.
  5. To make good by reparation; to make up for; to retrieve; to repair the loss or injury of; as, to recover lost time.

    "Loss of catel may recovered be." Chaucer.

    Even good men have many failings and lapses to lament and recover. Rogers.

  6. To make one's way; to come; to arrive.

    [Obs.]

    With much ado the Christians recovered to Antioch. Fuller.

  7. To restore from sickness, faintness, or the like; to bring back to life or health; to cure; to heal.

    The wine in my bottle will recover him. Shak.

  8. To obtain a judgement; to succeed in a lawsuit; as, the plaintiff has recovered in his suit.
  9. To overcome; to get the better of, -- as a state of mind or body.

    I do hope to recover my late hurt. Cowley.

    When I had recovered a little my first surprise. De Foe.

  10. To rescue; to deliver.

    That they may recover themselves out of the snare of the devil, who are taken captive by him. 2. Tim. ii. 26.

  11. To gain by motion or effort; to obtain; to reach; to come to.

    [Archaic]

    The forest is not three leagues off;
    If we recover that, we're sure enough.
    Shak.

    Except he could recover one of the Cities of Refuge he was to die. Hales.

  12. To gain as a compensation; to obtain in return for injury or debt; as, to recover damages in trespass; to recover debt and costs in a suit at law; to obtain title to by judgement in a court of law; as, to recover lands in ejectment or common recovery; to gain by legal process; as, to recover judgement against a defendant.

    Recover arms (Mil. Drill), a command whereby the piece is brought from the position of "aim" to that of "ready."

    Syn. -- To regain; repossess; resume; retrieve; recruit; heal; cure.

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Recover

RECOVER, verb transitive [Latin recupero; re and capio, to take.]

1. To regain; to get or obtain that which was lost; as, to recover stolen goods; to recover a town or territory which an enemy had taken; to recover sight or senses; to recover health or strength after sickness.

David recovered all that the Amalekites had carried away. 1 Samuel 30:8.

2. To restore from sickness; as, to recover one from leprosy. 2 Kings 5:3.

3. To revive from apparent death; as, to recover a drowned man.

4. To regain by reparation; to repair the loss of, or to repair an injury done by neglect; as, to recover lost time.

Good men have lapses and failings to lament and recover

5. To regain a former state by liberation from capture or possession.

That they may recover themselves out of the snare of the devil. 2 Timothy 2:26.

6. To gain as a compensation; to obtain in return for injury or debt; as, to recover damages in trespass; to recover debt and cost in a suit at law.

7. To reach; to come to.

The forest is not three leagues off; if we recover that, we're sure enough.

8. To obtain title to by judgment in a court of law; as, to recover lands in ejectment or common recovery.

RECOVER, verb intransitive

1. To regain health after sickness; to grow well; followed by of or from.

Go, inquire of Beelzebub, the god of Ekron, whether I shall recover of this disease. 2 Kings 1:2.

2. To regain a former state or condition after misfortune; as, to recover from a state of poverty or depression.

3. To obtain a judgment in law; to succeed in a lawsuit. The plaintiff has recovered in his suit.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

post

POST, a. Suborned; hired to do what is wrong. [Not in use.]

POST, n. [L. postis, from positus, the given participle of pono, to place.]

1. A piece of timber set upright, usually larger than a stake, and intended to support something else; as the posts of a house; the posts of a door; the posts of a gate; the posts of a fence.

2. A military station; the place where a single soldier or a body of troops is stationed. The sentinel must not desert his post. The troops are ordered to defend the post. Hence,

3. The troops stationed in a particular place, or the ground they occupy.

4. A public office or employment, that is, a fixed place or station.

When vice prevails and impious men bear sway,

The post of honor is a private station.

5. A messenger or a carrier of letters and papers; one that goes at stated times to convey the mail or dispatches. This sense also denotes fixedness, either from the practice of using relays of horses stationed at particular places, or of stationing men for carrying dispatches, or from the fixed stages where they were to be supplied with refreshment. [See Stage.] Xenophon informs us the Cyrus, king of Persia, established such stations or houses.

6. A seat or situation.

7. A sort of writing paper, such as is used for letters; letter paper.

8. An old game at cards.

To ride post, to be employed to carry dispatches and papers, and as such carriers rode in haste, hence the phrase signifies to ride in haste, to pass with expedition. Post is used also adverbially, for swiftly, expeditiously, or expressly.

Sent from Media post to Egypt.

Hence, to travel post, is to travel expeditiously by the use of fresh horses taken at certain stations.

Knight of the post, a fellow suborned or hired to do a bad action.

POST, v.i. To travel with speed.

And post o'er land and ocean without rest.

POST, v.t. To fix to a post; as, to post a notification.

1. To expose to public reproach by fixing the name to a post; to expose to opprobrium by some public action; as, to post a coward.

2. To advertise on a post or in a public place; as, to post a stray horse.

3. To set; to place; to station; as, to post troops on a hill, or in front or on the flank of an army.

4. In book-keeping, to carry accounts from the waste-book or journal to the ledger.

To post off, to put off; to delay. [Not used.]

POST, a Latin preposition, signifying after. It is used in this sense in composition in many English words.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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