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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [range]

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range

RANGE, v.t.

1. To set in a row or in rows; to place in a regular line, lines or ranks; to dispose in the proper order; as, to range troops in a body; to range men or ships in the order of battle.

2. To dispose in proper classes, orders or divisions; as, to range plants and animals in genera and species.

3. To dispose in a proper manner; to place in regular method; in a general sense. Range and arrange are used indifferently in the same sense.

4. To rove over; to pass over.

Teach him to range the ditch and force the brake.

[This use is elliptical, over being omitted.]

5. To sail or pass in a direction parallel to or near; as, to range the coast, that is, along the coast.

RANGE, v.i.

1. To rove at large; to wander without restraint or direction.

As a roaring lion and a ranging bear. Prov. 28.

2. To be placed in order; to be ranked.

'Tis better to be lowly born, and range with humble livers in content -

[In this sense, rank is now used.]

3. To lie in a particular direction.

Which way thy forests range -

We say, the front of a house ranges with the line of the street.

4. To sail or pass near or in the direction of; as, to range along the coast.

RANGE, n. [See Rank.]

1. A row; a rank; things in a line; as a range of buildings; a range of mountains; ranges of colors.

2. A class; an order.

The next range of beings above him are the immaterial intelligences -

3. A wandering or roving; excursion.

He may take a range all the world over.

4. Space or room for excursion.

A man has not enough range of thought -

5. Compass or extent of excursion; space taken in by any thing extended or ranked in order; as the range of Newton's thought. No philosopher has embraced a wider range.

Far as creation's ample range extends.

6. The step of a ladder. [Corrupted in popular language to rung.]

7. A kitchen grate.

8. A bolting sieve to sift meal.

9. In gunnery, the path of a bullet or bomb, or the line it describes from the mouth of the piece to the point where it lodges; or the whole distance which it passes. When a cannon lies horizontally, it is called the right level, or point blank range; when the muzzle is elevated to 45 degrees, it is called the utmost range. To this may be added the ricochet, the rolling or bounding shot, with the piece elevated from three to six degrees.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [range]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

RANGE, v.t.

1. To set in a row or in rows; to place in a regular line, lines or ranks; to dispose in the proper order; as, to range troops in a body; to range men or ships in the order of battle.

2. To dispose in proper classes, orders or divisions; as, to range plants and animals in genera and species.

3. To dispose in a proper manner; to place in regular method; in a general sense. Range and arrange are used indifferently in the same sense.

4. To rove over; to pass over.

Teach him to range the ditch and force the brake.

[This use is elliptical, over being omitted.]

5. To sail or pass in a direction parallel to or near; as, to range the coast, that is, along the coast.

RANGE, v.i.

1. To rove at large; to wander without restraint or direction.

As a roaring lion and a ranging bear. Prov. 28.

2. To be placed in order; to be ranked.

'Tis better to be lowly born, and range with humble livers in content -

[In this sense, rank is now used.]

3. To lie in a particular direction.

Which way thy forests range -

We say, the front of a house ranges with the line of the street.

4. To sail or pass near or in the direction of; as, to range along the coast.

RANGE, n. [See Rank.]

1. A row; a rank; things in a line; as a range of buildings; a range of mountains; ranges of colors.

2. A class; an order.

The next range of beings above him are the immaterial intelligences -

3. A wandering or roving; excursion.

He may take a range all the world over.

4. Space or room for excursion.

A man has not enough range of thought -

5. Compass or extent of excursion; space taken in by any thing extended or ranked in order; as the range of Newton's thought. No philosopher has embraced a wider range.

Far as creation's ample range extends.

6. The step of a ladder. [Corrupted in popular language to rung.]

7. A kitchen grate.

8. A bolting sieve to sift meal.

9. In gunnery, the path of a bullet or bomb, or the line it describes from the mouth of the piece to the point where it lodges; or the whole distance which it passes. When a cannon lies horizontally, it is called the right level, or point blank range; when the muzzle is elevated to 45 degrees, it is called the utmost range. To this may be added the ricochet, the rolling or bounding shot, with the piece elevated from three to six degrees.

RANGE, n. [Fr. rangée. See Rank.]

  1. A row; a rank; things in a line; as, a row of buildings; a range of mountains; ranges of colors. – Newton.
  2. A class; an order. The next range of beings above him are the immaterial intelligences. – Hale.
  3. A wandering or roving; excursion. He may take a range all the world over. – South.
  4. Space or room for excursion. A man has not enough range of thought. – Addison.
  5. Compass or extent of excursion; space taken in by any thing extended or ranked in order; as, the range of Newton's thought. No philosopher has embraced a wider range. Far as creation's ample range extends. – Pope.
  6. The step of a ladder. – Clarendon. [Corrupted in popular language to rung.]
  7. A kitchen grate. – Bacon. Wotton.
  8. A bolting sieve to sift meal.
  9. In gunnery, the path of a bullet or bomb, or the line it describes from the mouth of the piece to the point where it lodges; or the whole distance which it passes. When a cannon lies horizontally, it is called the right level, or point blank range; when the muzzle is elevated to 45 degrees, it is called the utmost range. To this may be added the ricochet, the rolling or bounding shot, with the piece elevated from three to six degrees. – Encyc. Mar. Dict.

RANGE, v.i.

  1. To rove at large; to wander without restraint or direction. As a roaring lion and ranging bear. – Prov. xxviii.
  2. To be placed in order; to be ranked. 'Tis better to be lowly born, / And range with humble livers in content. – Shak. [In this sense, rank is now used.]
  3. To lie in a particular direction. Which way thy forests range. – Dryden. We say, the front of a house ranges with the line of the street.
  4. To sail or pass near or in the direction of; as, to range along the coast.

RANGE, v.t. [Fr. ranger; Arm. rencqa, ranqein; W. rhenciaw, from rhenc, reng, rank, – which see.]

  1. To set in a row or in rows; to place in a regular line, lines, or ranks; to dispose in the proper order; as, to range troops in a body; to range men or ships in the order of battle.
  2. To dispose in proper classes, orders or divisions; as, to range plants and animals in genera and species.
  3. To dispose in a proper manner; to place in regular method; in a general sense. Range and Arrange are used indifferently in the same sense.
  4. To rove over; to pass over. Teach him to range the ditch and force the brake. – Gay. [This use is elliptical, over being omitted.]
  5. To sail or pass in a direction parallel to or near; as, to range the coast, that is, along the coast.

Range
  1. To set in a row, or in rows; to place in a regular line or lines, or in ranks; to dispose in the proper order; to rank; as, to range soldiers in line.

    Maccabeus ranged his army by bands. 2 Macc. xii. 20.

  2. To rove at large; to wander without restraint or direction; to roam.

    Like a ranging spaniel that barks at every bird he sees. Burton.

  3. A series of things in a line; a row; a rank; as, a range of buildings; a range of mountains.
  4. To place (as a single individual) among others in a line, row, or order, as in the ranks of an army; -- usually, reflexively and figuratively, (in the sense) to espouse a cause, to join a party, etc.

    It would be absurd in me to range myself on the side of the Duke of Bedford and the corresponding society. Burke.

  5. To have range; to change or differ within limits; to be capable of projecting, or to admit of being projected, especially as to horizontal distance; as, the temperature ranged through seventy degrees Fahrenheit; the gun ranges three miles; the shot ranged four miles.
  6. An aggregate of individuals in one rank or degree; an order; a class.

    The next range of beings above him are the immaterial intelligences. Sir M. Hale.

  7. To separate into parts; to sift.

    [Obs.] Holland.
  8. To be placed in order; to be ranked; to admit of arrangement or classification; to rank.

    And range with humble livers in content. Shak.

  9. The step of a ladder; a rung.

    Clarendon.
  10. To dispose in a classified or in systematic order; to arrange regularly; as, to range plants and animals in genera and species.
  11. To have a certain direction; to correspond in direction; to be or keep in a corresponding line; to trend or run; -- often followed by with; as, the front of a house ranges with the street; to range along the coast.

    Which way the forests range. Dryden.

  12. A kitchen grate.

    [Obs.]

    He was bid at his first coming to take off the range, and let down the cinders. L'Estrange.

  13. To rove over or through; as, to range the fields.

    Teach him to range the ditch, and force the brake. Gay.

  14. To be native to, or live in, a certain district or region; as, the peba ranges from Texas to Paraguay.

    Syn. -- To rove; roam; ramble; wander; stroll.

  15. An extended cooking apparatus of cast iron, set in brickwork, and affording conveniences for various ways of cooking; also, a kind of cooking stove.
  16. To sail or pass in a direction parallel to or near; as, to range the coast.

    * Compare the last two senses (5 and 6) with the French ranger une côte.

  17. A bolting sieve to sift meal.

    [Obs. or Prov. Eng.]
  18. To be native to, or to live in; to frequent.
  19. A wandering or roving; a going to and fro; an excursion; a ramble; an expedition.

    He may take a range all the world over. South.

  20. That which may be ranged over; place or room for excursion; especially, a region of country in which cattle or sheep may wander and pasture.
  21. Extent or space taken in by anything excursive; compass or extent of excursion; reach; scope; discursive power; as, the range of one's voice, or authority.

    Far as creation's ample range extends. Pope.

    The range and compass of Hammond's knowledge filled the whole circle of the arts. Bp. Fell.

    A man has not enough range of thought. Addison.

  22. The region within which a plant or animal naturally lives.
  23. The horizontal distance to which a shot or other projectile is carried.

    (b)
  24. In the public land system of the United States, a row or line of townships lying between two successive meridian lines six miles apart.

    * The meridians included in each great survey are numbered in order east and west from the "principal meridian" of that survey, and the townships in the range are numbered north and south from the "base line," which runs east and west; as, township No. 6, N., range 7, W., from the fifth principal meridian.

  25. See Range of cable, below.

    Range of accommodation (Optics), the distance between the near point and the far point of distinct vision, -- usually measured and designated by the strength of the lens which if added to the refracting media of the eye would cause the rays from the near point to appear as if they came from the far point. -- Range finder (Gunnery), an instrument, or apparatus, variously constructed, for ascertaining the distance of an inaccessible object, -- used to determine what elevation must be given to a gun in order to hit the object; a position finder. -- Range of cable (Naut.), a certain length of slack cable ranged along the deck preparatory to letting go the anchor. -- Range work (Masonry), masonry of squared stones laid in courses each of which is of even height throughout the length of the wall; -- distinguished from broken range work, which consists of squared stones laid in courses not continuously of even height. -- To get the range of (an object) (Gun.), to find the angle at which the piece must be raised to reach (the object) without carrying beyond.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Range

RANGE, verb transitive

1. To set in a row or in rows; to place in a regular line, lines or ranks; to dispose in the proper order; as, to range troops in a body; to range men or ships in the order of battle.

2. To dispose in proper classes, orders or divisions; as, to range plants and animals in genera and species.

3. To dispose in a proper manner; to place in regular method; in a general sense. range and arrange are used indifferently in the same sense.

4. To rove over; to pass over.

Teach him to range the ditch and force the brake.

[This use is elliptical, over being omitted.]

5. To sail or pass in a direction parallel to or near; as, to range the coast, that is, along the coast.

RANGE, verb intransitive

1. To rove at large; to wander without restraint or direction.

As a roaring lion and a ranging bear. Proverbs 28:1.

2. To be placed in order; to be ranked.

'Tis better to be lowly born, and range with humble livers in content -

[In this sense, rank is now used.]

3. To lie in a particular direction.

Which way thy forests range -

We say, the front of a house ranges with the line of the street.

4. To sail or pass near or in the direction of; as, to range along the coast.

RANGE, noun [See Rank.]

1. A row; a rank; things in a line; as a range of buildings; a range of mountains; ranges of colors.

2. A class; an order.

The next range of beings above him are the immaterial intelligences -

3. A wandering or roving; excursion.

He may take a range all the world over.

4. Space or room for excursion.

A man has not enough range of thought -

5. Compass or extent of excursion; space taken in by any thing extended or ranked in order; as the range of Newton's thought. No philosopher has embraced a wider range

Far as creation's ample range extends.

6. The step of a ladder. [Corrupted in popular language to rung.]

7. A kitchen grate.

8. A bolting sieve to sift meal.

9. In gunnery, the path of a bullet or bomb, or the line it describes from the mouth of the piece to the point where it lodges; or the whole distance which it passes. When a cannon lies horizontally, it is called the right level, or point blank range; when the muzzle is elevated to 45 degrees, it is called the utmost range To this may be added the ricochet, the rolling or bounding shot, with the piece elevated from three to six degrees.

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IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

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He believes himself a man of importance.

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