HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Monday - December 10, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [rack]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

rack

RACK, n. [Eng. to reach. See Reach and Break.]

1. An engine of torture, used for extorting confessions from criminals or suspected persons. The rack is entirely unknown in free countries.

2. Torture; extreme pain; anguish.

A fit of the stone puts a king to the rack and makes him as miserable as it does the meanest subject.

3. Any instrument for stretching or extending any thing; as a rack for bending a bow.

4. A grate on which bacon is laid.

5. A wooden frame of open work in which hay is laid for horses and cattle for feeding.

6. The frame of bones of an animal; a skeleton. We say, a rack of bones.

7. A frame of timber on a ship's bowsprit.

RACK, n. [Eng. crag.]

The neck and spine of a fore quarter of veal or mutton.

[The two foregoing words are doubtless from one original.]

RACK, n. [See Reek.]

Properly, vapor; hence, thin flying broken clouds, or any portion of floating vapor in the sky.

The winds in the upper region, which move the clouds above, which we call the rack -

The great globe itself, yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve, and, like this unsubstantial pageant, faded, leave not a rack behind.

It is disputed however, whether rack in this passage should not be wreck.

RACK, n. [for arrack. See Arrack.] Among the Tartars, a spirituous liquor made of mare's milk which has become sour and is then distilled.

RACK, v.i. [See the noun.]

1. Properly, to steam; to rise, as vapor.

[See Reek, which is the word used.]

2. To fly, as vapor or broken clouds.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [rack]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

RACK, n. [Eng. to reach. See Reach and Break.]

1. An engine of torture, used for extorting confessions from criminals or suspected persons. The rack is entirely unknown in free countries.

2. Torture; extreme pain; anguish.

A fit of the stone puts a king to the rack and makes him as miserable as it does the meanest subject.

3. Any instrument for stretching or extending any thing; as a rack for bending a bow.

4. A grate on which bacon is laid.

5. A wooden frame of open work in which hay is laid for horses and cattle for feeding.

6. The frame of bones of an animal; a skeleton. We say, a rack of bones.

7. A frame of timber on a ship's bowsprit.

RACK, n. [Eng. crag.]

The neck and spine of a fore quarter of veal or mutton.

[The two foregoing words are doubtless from one original.]

RACK, n. [See Reek.]

Properly, vapor; hence, thin flying broken clouds, or any portion of floating vapor in the sky.

The winds in the upper region, which move the clouds above, which we call the rack -

The great globe itself, yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve, and, like this unsubstantial pageant, faded, leave not a rack behind.

It is disputed however, whether rack in this passage should not be wreck.

RACK, n. [for arrack. See Arrack.] Among the Tartars, a spirituous liquor made of mare's milk which has become sour and is then distilled.

RACK, v.i. [See the noun.]

1. Properly, to steam; to rise, as vapor.

[See Reek, which is the word used.]

2. To fly, as vapor or broken clouds.

RACK, n.1 [D. rek, rack, stretch; rekker, to stretch; Sax. racan, ræcan, Eng. to reach; G. recken, to stretch; reckbank, a rack. See Reach and Break. Class Rg, No. 18, 21, 33.]

  1. An engine of torture, used for extorting confessions from criminals or suspected persons. The rack is entirely unknown in free countries.
  2. Torture; extreme pain; anguish. A fit of the stone puts king to the rack and makes him as miserable as it does the meanest subject. – Temple.
  3. Any instrument for stretching or extending any thing; as, a rack for bending a bow. – Temple.
  4. A grate on which bacon is laid.
  5. A wooden frame of open work in which hay is laid for horses and cattle for feeding.
  6. The frame of bones of an animal; a skeleton. We say, a rack of bones.
  7. A frame of timber on a ship's bowsprit. – Mar. Dict.

RACK, n.2 [Sax. hracca, the neck; Gr. ῥαχις, the spine; W. rhac; D. kraag, G. kragen, Sw. and Dan. krage, a collar; Old Eng. crag.]

The neck and spine of a fore quarter of veal or mutton. [The two foregoing words are doubtless from one original.]


RACK, n.3 [Sax. rec, steam; recan, to exhale; D. rook, rooken; G. rauch, rauchen; Sw. rök, röka; Dan, rog, roger. See Reek.]

Properly, vapor; hence, thin flying broken clouds, or portion of floating vapor in the sky. The winds in the upper region, which move the clouds above, which we call the rack. – Bacon. The great globe itself, / Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve, / And, like this unsubstantial pageant, faded, / Leave not a rack behind. – Shak. It is disputed, however, whether rack in this passage should not be wreck.


RACK, n.4 [for arrack. See Arrack.]

Among the Tartars, a spirituous liquor made of mare's milk which has become sour and is then distilled. – Encyc.


RACK, n.5

In machinery, a rectilineal sliding piece, with teeth cut on its edge for working with a wheel.


RACK, v.i. [Sax. recan. See the Noun.]

  1. Properly, to steam; to rise, as vapor. [See Reek, which is the word used.]
  2. To fly, as vapor or broken clouds. – Shak.

RACK, v.t.1 [from the noun.]

  1. To torture; to stretch or strain on the rack or wheel; as, to rack a criminal or suspected person, to extort a confession of his guilt, or compel him to betray his accomplices. – Dryden.
  2. To torment; to torture; to affect with extreme pain or anguish; as, racked with deep despair. – Milton.
  3. To harass by exaction. The landlords there shamefully rack their tenants. – Spenser.
  4. To stretch; to strain vehemently; to wrest; as, to rack and stretch Scripture; to rack invention. Hooker. Waterland. The wisest among the heathens racked their wits. – Tillotson.
  5. To stretch; to extend. – Shak.

RACK, v.t.2 [Ar. رَاقَ rauka, to clear, to strain. Class Rg, No. 8.]

To draw off from the lees; to draw off, as pure liquor from its sediment; as, to rack cider or wine; to rack off liquor. – Bacon.


Rack
  1. Same as Arrack.
  2. The neck and spine of a fore quarter of veal or mutton.
  3. A wreck; destruction.

    [Obs., except in a few phrases.]

    Rack and ruin, destruction; utter ruin. [Colloq.] -- To go to rack, to perish; to be destroyed. [Colloq.] "All goes to rack." Pepys.

  4. Thin, flying, broken clouds, or any portion of floating vapor in the sky.

    Shak.

    The winds in the upper region, which move the clouds above, which we call the rack, . . . pass without noise. Bacon.

    And the night rack came rolling up. C. Kingsley.

  5. To fly, as vapor or broken clouds.
  6. To amble fast, causing a rocking or swaying motion of the body] to pace; -- said of a horse.

    Fuller.
  7. A fast amble.
  8. To draw off from the lees or sediment, as wine.

    It is in common practice to draw wine or beer from the lees (which we call racking), whereby it will clarify much the sooner. Bacon.

    Rack vintage, wine cleansed and drawn from the lees. Cowell.

  9. An instrument or frame used for stretching, extending, retaining, or displaying, something.

    Specifically: (a)
  10. To extend by the application of force; to stretch or strain; specifically, to stretch on the rack or wheel; to torture by an engine which strains the limbs and pulls the joints.

    He was racked and miserably tormented. Foxe.

  11. A bar with teeth on its face, or edge, to work with those of a wheel, pinion, or worm, which is to drive it or be driven by it.
  12. To torment; to torture; to affect with extreme pain or anguish.

    Vaunting aloud but racked with deep despair. Milton.

  13. That which is extorted; exaction.

    [Obs.] Sir E. Sandys.

    Mangle rack. (Mach.) See under Mangle, n. -- Rack block. (Naut.) See def. 1 (f), above. -- Rack lashing, a lashing or binding where the rope is tightened, and held tight by the use of a small stick of wood twisted around. -- Rack rail (Railroads), a toothed rack, laid as a rail, to afford a hold for teeth on the driving wheel of a locomotive for climbing steep gradients, as in ascending a mountain. -- Rack saw, a saw having wide teeth. -- Rack stick, the stick used in a rack lashing. -- To be on the rack, to suffer torture, physical or mental. -- To live at rack and manger, to live on the best at another's expense. [Colloq.] -- To put to the rack, to subject to torture; to torment.

    A fit of the stone puts a king to the rack, and makes him as miserable as it does the meanest subject. Sir W. Temple.

  14. To stretch or strain, in a figurative sense; hence, to harass, or oppress by extortion.

    The landlords there shamefully rack their tenants. Spenser.

    They [landlords] rack their rents an ace too high. Gascoigne.

    Grant that I may never rack a Scripture simile beyond the true intent thereof. Fuller.

    Try what my credit can in Venice do;
    That shall be racked even to the uttermost.
    Shak.

  15. To wash on a rack, as metals or ore.
  16. To bind together, as two ropes, with cross turns of yarn, marline, etc.

    To rack one's brains or wits, to exert them to the utmost for the purpose of accomplishing something.

    Syn. -- To torture; torment; rend; tear.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

73

573

64

620

87

608
Rack

RACK, noun [Eng. to reach. See Reach and Break.]

1. An engine of torture, used for extorting confessions from criminals or suspected persons. The rack is entirely unknown in free countries.

2. Torture; extreme pain; anguish.

A fit of the stone puts a king to the rack and makes him as miserable as it does the meanest subject.

3. Any instrument for stretching or extending any thing; as a rack for bending a bow.

4. A grate on which bacon is laid.

5. A wooden frame of open work in which hay is laid for horses and cattle for feeding.

6. The frame of bones of an animal; a skeleton. We say, a rack of bones.

7. A frame of timber on a ship's bowsprit.

RACK, noun [Eng. crag.]

The neck and spine of a fore quarter of veal or mutton.

[The two foregoing words are doubtless from one original.]

RACK, noun [See Reek.]

Properly, vapor; hence, thin flying broken clouds, or any portion of floating vapor in the sky.

The winds in the upper region, which move the clouds above, which we call the rack -

The great globe itself, yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve, and, like this unsubstantial pageant, faded, leave not a rack behind.

It is disputed however, whether rack in this passage should not be wreck.

RACK, noun [for arrack. See Arrack.] Among the Tartars, a spirituous liquor made of mare's milk which has become sour and is then distilled.

RACK, verb intransitive [See the noun.]

1. Properly, to steam; to rise, as vapor.

[See Reek, which is the word used.]

2. To fly, as vapor or broken clouds.

RACK, verb transitive [from the noun.]

1. To torture; to stretch or strain on the rack or wheel; as, to rack a criminal or suspected person, to extort a confession of his guilt, or compel him to betray his accomplices.

2. To torment; to torture; to affect with extreme pain or anguish; as racked with deep despair.

3. To harass by exaction.

The landlords there shamefully rack their tenants.

4. To stretch; to strain vehemently; to wrest; as, to rack and stretch Scripture; to rack invention.

The wisest among the heathens racked their wits -

5. To stretch; to extend.

RACK, verb transitive

To draw off from the lees; to draw off, as pure liquor from its sediment; as, to rack cider or wine; to rack off liquor.

Why 1828?

0
4
 


To better understand the meaning of words without the invasive affects of slang, political correctness, and modern american language.

— James (Littleton, CO)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

aforehand

AFO'REHAND, adv. [afore and hand.]

1. In time previous; by previous provision; as, he is ready aforehand.

She is come aforehand to anoint my body. Mark 14.

2. a. Prepared; previously provided; as, to be aforehand in business. Hence in popular language, amply provided; well supplied with the means of living; having means beyond the requirements of necessity; moderately wealthy. The word is popularly changed into aforehanded, beforehanded, or rather forehanded; as, a forehanded farmer.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

155

305

Compact Edition

124

105

CD-ROM

102

81

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.321 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top